Do not challenge our ‘special rights’, Khairy tells non-Malays


November 26, 2013

Do not challenge our ‘special rights’, Khairy tells non-Malays

najib-dan-khairy-Non-Malays should never again dispute the special rights of the Malays and the position of the rulers, Khairy Jamaluddin said today, adding that Malays themselves never questioned vernacular schools and the citizenship of non-Malays.

The UMNO Youth Chief said in his policy speech at the party’s general assembly that the Malays had “accepted and they had never questioned” the social contract they agreed upon during the formation of Malaysia.

“If the Malays can accept it by not raising the matter of citizenship and acknowledging that we cannot shut down vernacular schools, why are there those among non-Malays who refuse to honour what they have previously agreed upon? Why are there those who ask for the Malay special privileges to be stopped, those who dispute the position of the Malay rulers and even those who cannot speak a word of the national language? If the Malay people are steadfast in their principles of upholding the agreement, we want to demand that they uphold their end of the bargain. Never again dispute what has been agreed upon,” said Khairy.

Khairy said it was a huge sacrifice for the Malays to allow other races to be a part of the country, so non-Malays must keep their end of the bargain and not question Malay rights.

“The demography of the nation changed drastically when the Malays opened the doors of the land to other races to build the nation together. We cannot imagine how big a sacrifice this is.So great were the sacrifices of the Malay people, and all that we ask in return is for the non-Malays to accept several of those matters which I just brought up as the other end of the bargain”, he added.

Khairy also defended the existence of vernacular schools, saying that they were allowed as part of the “status quo” which had “existed pre-Independence, and which will continue to exist”.

Despite Khairy’s statement, some UMNO grassroots leaders have in the past few months demanded that Chinese and Indian schools be shut down for the sake of national unity.

Last Sunday, a coalition of 58 Malay-rights groups repeated the call, and even urged Putrajaya to silence “radical” education organisations like Dong Zhong with the threat of de-registration.

Khairy conceded today that there were “fringe voices” questioning the existence of vernacular schools, but stressed that the UMNO leadership has long accepted the current education system.

“It is already forged in the laws of the land and not even the Minister of Education can change the fate of the vernacular schools.If we do not want to bring up these matters of the things that have been given, do not question the special rights and privileges of the natives,” he said. – November 26, 2014.

A Message to Khairy and his Cohorts from Tariq Ismail

Read this: http://myrepositori.pnm.gov.my/xmlui/bitstream/handle/123456789/2420/MewujudkanRakyatMalaysiaProgresifBersatuHati.pdf?sequence=1

Tariq Ismail is the grandson of the late former Deputy Prime Minister, Tun Dr. Ismail Abdul Rahman. He is from Aura Merdeka – Ikatan Sejagat (AMIS) group on Facebook.  Tariq was brought up by the grandfather and his late wife, Toh Puan Norashikin, and is related to PM Najib and Home Affairs Minister, Hishamuddin Hussein. He has something to say about UMNO-Baru (below). 

And I wonder why this diversion from Khairy Jamaluddin, the UMNO Youth Leader. The real issue is endemic corruption and UMNO Baru’s politics of patronage, race and religion, which Khairy chose not to mention. The Special Position of the Malays and Sovereignty of our Malay Rulers was never an issue. UMNO  Baru played this card because it is under seige.Unless there is a serious attempt at reform, it will be a rough road ahead for the party.–Din Merican

Here is why from Tariq Ismail.

Malaysia for Malaysians without bigotry or intolerance.

“MY FAMILY is all UMNO and I was raised in the UMNO mould. However, myTariq Ismail family had instilled into me a sense of Bushido, which included passion and fair play. Always uphold your religion as it is a personal matter and treat others with equality.

I had tried to join UMNO in 2002 with my grandmother pulling my ears after she found the application form and her words were – I raised you and over my dead body will you join the very party that will eat you inside. Moreover, in 15 years time you will be part of a machine that your very soul will diminish.

In 2008, I did try to join UMNO because I thought the wind of change that were apparently blowing then would lead the party to progress. However, no cawangan in Johor or KL would accept me. I scouted around from one UMNO division to another with no result. The Special Branch spooks that looked after Southern Johor told me UMNO will never accept a true blue blood like me.

Just before my grandmother passed away in 2010, she made me promise her to never join the party. I never understood why until I received a call from Dato Seri Anwar Ibrahim (DSAI) to lead the Johor siege in 2013. I refused DSAI ‘s request for me to join as I knew I would be a scapegoat if PR had lost.

I still have an affinity with UMNO, but the pragmatic and secular UMNO of old, in which they worked together with all races to ensure this nation was prosperous and united in spirit via tolerance, compassion and recognising and accepting each other’s diversity.

Today’s UMNO is a cesspool of bigoted nouveau riche that has split the Malays and encourage the Malay siege mentality. Mahathir gave the Malays a cosmetic makeover but over looked the Malay inner soul. The Malay soul is lost. Will it be recovered? Yes. Will it be from UMNO…No!

Would I support Anwar Ibrahim to be Prime Minister? No, as he was part of that UMNO Baru sheananigans. However, if DSAI were to retire and promise the public that he will not fight for “justice” and the PM seat, and if Azmin were to take the lead, I may consider joining PKR.

My strategy is such that I shall follow the winds, and forecast the tide. The ship will be steered in one direction – a Malaysia for Malaysians without bigotry or intolerance. A first step is AMIS. Show that a united Malaysian movement of social moderates can steer the nation without playing into anyone’s cards.”–Tariq Ismail

Justice is seen to be done : The case of Rosli Dahlan


November 24, 2014

Justice is seen to be done: The Case of Rosli Dahlan

by Din  Merican

‎My young friend Rosli Dahlan has been in the news a lot lately. He defends cases which most Muslim lawyers won’t want to even touch with a 10 foot pole. He was the Borders lawyer who successfully declared that s.13 of the FT Syariah Criminal Offences Act was ultra vires the Federal Constitution.

Then Rosli got embroiled in the Kassim Ahmad case and made a forceful argument exposing that JAWI acted illegally in arresting Kassim in Kedah and abducting him to KL.‎

What was more alarming to most Muslims was that he exposed that the Syariah Court is just an inferior court and even inferior to the magistrates court! But unknown to many, Rosli faces his personal tribulations alone.

Today, his own case came before the Court of Appeal. Some of you may recall that Rosli had sued the AG‎ Tan Sri Gani Patail, MACC Chief commissioner Tan Sri Abu Kassim, former IGP Tan Sri Musa Hassan and various officers of the MACC and AG Chambers including Dato Nordin Hassan and Dato Razak Musa (of Teoh Beng Hock fame). Rosli had faced many obstacles when the AG filed all kinds of application to prevent the case from coming to trial.

Readers will remember that A-G Gani Patail claimed that he had absolute immunity to do what he wants including fixing innocent citizens like Rosli. In that case, the High Court Judge Wazeer Alam Mydin Meera ruled that ” the claim of absolute immunity is anathema to modern notions of accountability”. A-G Gani was not happy and appealed to the Court of‎ Appeal. So, today was the A-G’s appeal.

before being made a judge, said he agreed that deliberate abuse of power by those holding a public office was misfeasance in public office.

As if it was not enough that Rosli had to face 3 Tan Sris, ‎A-G Gani Patail then engaged senior counsel Tan Sri Cecil Abraham to act for him. Many will recall that Tan Sri Cecil Abraham is implicated in the PI Bala case. That makes 4 Tan Sris against Rosli.

RD vs 4 Tan Sris

RD vs 4 Tan Sris

It seems that Tan Sri Cecil Abraham filed a last minute Written Submissions only yesterday at 3.45pm to throw Rosli’s counsel off guard. The appeal came on this morning.

‎In an apparent show of impartiality, Judges Dato Alizatul and Dato Nalini recused themselves when it was pointed out that Justice Alizatul had dismissed Rosli’s Judicial Review Leave application which challenged the very MACC notice for which he was charged and which the Trial Judge later held to be void notices.

At the same time, Judge Nalini recused herself after saying this is a high profile case involving A-G Gani Patail and she had sat in the panel that dismissed NST’s appeal when the High Court Judge Siti Khadijah Badjenid found NST and MACC liable for defamation and for breaching s.21(4) MACCA and ordered damages of RM300k to be paid by NST and MACC to Rosli.

I feel sorry for Rosli that he had to go through all these obstacles just to see his day in court to redeem himself. The incident happened in 2007. Today is 2014. It’s been 7 years and yet the case is not even anywhere near a trial date because A-G Gani Patail just does not want to face Rosli in court. That is what guilty people do, they do not want to face their Day of Judgement.

I also feel sorry for Rosli because his case is being treated like a joke when the Court of Appeal has now fixed the next hearing date on 1st April 2015 which is April Fool’s Day.

I say to Rosli- don’t be daunted.‎ God will protect you and will give you the last laugh. That’s how it has been for the last few cases where Rosli has won all the cases and the AG has been soundly beaten like in the Judgement by Judge Wazeer Alam. To the Justices‎ in our courts, I say to you – give the man the justice he deserves and don’t throw technical obstacles to protect these rogues in government. The higher titled they are, the harder you must come down on them. Let Justice be seen to be done!

Read this and don’t forget to help defend freedom:-

http://dinmerican.wordpress.com/2014/10/16/fund-for-kassim-ahmad-and-other-persecuted-activists/

President Jokowi Gets on with His Job


November 24, 2014

President Jokowi Gets on with His Job: No Talk, Just Action

tansri-sherif

by Tan Sri Mohd Sheriff bin Mohd Kassim

Jokowi has barely stepped into office as the new President of Indonesia and he is already making waves.

He is coming into world prominence not by grabbing the microphone to makeGovernor of Jakarta thunderous speeches about race and religion or picking on the ethnic Chinese businessmen, foreigners and  western imperialists  as scapegoats for his country’s endemic corruption, inefficiencies and economic backwardness. Instead, he is getting admiration at home and abroad  by simply doing what his people expect from him –just be his humble self  and get on with the job he was elected for.

His bold move to cut down on  subsidies and make the people pay more for fuel  will not endear him to millions of  poor Indonesians but it is precisely the kind of action that is needed to show he means business in his promise to strengthen the economy and find the money to build roads, schools and hospitals for the masses. It is also a warning sign that he is not afraid to take the unpopular measures to stop the wastages and  abuses that have plagued this resource rich country for decades . A few years down the road, when the man on the street sees signs of progress all around him, he will thank his President for being  politically honest in doing what needs to be done.

The Muslim world can also look up to him to lead in the path of moderation and pragmatism.His brave statements condemning Islamic terrorism and extremism during the election campaign shows  that he is one who is unafraid to speak his mind for fear of losing  votes. Nor was he deterred when Islamic groups tried to stop him from appointing an ethnic Chinese to be Governor of Jakarta (above right). The silent majority will be cheering him for standing up to the racists and religious bigots and simply doing what is right.

I will not be surprised that in the near future, he will act on the blasphemy laws , which Amnesty International  has higlighted for the several cases of injustice inflicted on  non-Sunni religious minorities. Being a former businessman himself, Jokowi knows that Indonesia cannot let religious extremism and unfair Islamic  laws to fester because it will have a negative impact on the country’s investment climate. Without large doses of local and foreign investment, Indonesia cannot progress at the rate Jokowi has in mind.

Jokowi Widodo

Jokowi and his wife travelled to Singapore recently on economy class ticket to attend his son’s graduation from the Anglo-Chinese International University . By this simple act of self-discipline in not abusing his position to use his presidential plane for a private visit, he has sent volumes of signal to his countrymen that he is going  to be an honest and clean president. Cynics may dismiss this simple act of humility  as political showmanship but , to the ordinary millions of poor people who still remember the luxurious grandeur of their past presidents and their first ladies , they thank God that Indonesia is now changing for the better.

All the best to Indonesian President Jokowi as he leads the country with the largest Muslim population in the world towards economic progress and social stability and by so doing, make himself as an example for other Muslim leaders  to follow.

Horrendous Devastation of Cameron Highlands due to Plainly Ugly Greed


November 23, 2014

Horrendous Devastation of Cameron Highlands due to Plainly Ugly Greed

by Tunku A  Aziz@www.nst.com.my

Sultan of PahangIF a picture, as the saying goes, is worth a thousand words, then the New Straits Times’ startlingly brutal depiction of the horrendous devastation of Cameron Highlands merits at least ten thousand drops of tears of anger, frustration and despair because those entrusted to protect our precious natural heritage have betrayed our trust.

 The wanton destruction of the environment and the disregard for human life all bear the hallmarks of human greed; we were jolted out of our complacency and forced to see corruption in all its ugliness.

No longer do we think that corruption is none of our business; no longer do we dare say, “Why all the fuss when only two parties are involved, the giver and the taker?” And no longer will we be able to dismiss the fact that there are victims whenever corruption rears its head.

The Cameron Highlands tragedy, both in human and environmental terms, has turned corruption on its head. The pristine hill station of the 1960s and 1970s is now a distant memory. My annual Christmas break was usually spent with my family in Cameron Highlands, with its promise of bracing mountain air and country walks in quiet, salubrious surroundings. This yearly ritual, sadly, started to lose its appeal with uncontrolled development that rapidly changed the character of the place.

Overnight, Cameron Highlands, the country’s premier Little England that once had trout in its mountain streams and rose bushes in every garden, took on an ominously grotesque aspect. It was transformed into a noisy, gaudy and boisterous bazaar that could give Petaling Street a good run for its money. I have not been back there for more than thirty years, preferring to treasure in the deep recesses of my memory the Cameron Highlands that I once knew and loved.

The recent tragedy has, as expected, produced a slew of responses, ranging from the sublime to the ridiculous. In my long and eventful existence, I have heard a few ideas that are clearly beyond the pale, but nothing has quite prepared me for the proposal, that I suppose, could only have been conceived in the cluttered mind of a politician: to plant a million trees over a three-year period as part of a programme to rehabilitate Cameron Highlands that many believe to have been damaged beyond redemption.

I say with all due deference to the Natural Resources and Environment Minister, Datuk Seri G.palanivel Palanivel, that we are not talking about transplanting hair on a vain politician’s head — a painful enough process as some who have resorted to this treatment will tell you.

A million trees? The mind boggles at the very idea. Audacious and out of the box, yes. But is it doable and at what cost? All this leads me to ask why, with all the empirical evidence staring them in the face, didn’t our enforcement officers do what they were employed to do — enforce the law, plain and simple?

There were quietly whispered hints of “interference from above”, which puzzles me quite a bit because the “Yellow Letters”, according to the sultan of Pahang himself, did not come from the palace because, for one thing, they were not written on the official palace note paper and did not bear his signature. Who is it then that enforcement officers were pointing the finger at?

Whoever the exalted personage might be, he must be exposed because it is vitally important to show our people that there is one law for all. The Sultan’s standing and reputation, no less, must be protected and not to be trifled with.

The drama that unfolded on the slippery slopes and the silted valleys of Cameron Highlands has brought us face to face with the debilitating effects of corruption on society.

The reality on the ground is not a pretty sight. It is corruption writ large: if that does not turn our stomachs, then I suggest we deserve more of the same. The time for whinging is over. It is about time we took ownership of the fight against corruption and its attendant problems. I do not think it would be wise to leave such an important matter as fighting corruption especially to politicians. There is no need for elaboration.

Pahang, of course, is not alone of the Malaysian states that can claim a long history of illegal logging and land clearing. Stories, both anecdotal and factual, of corruption in forestry and land offices up and down the country are legion. Sabah and Sarawak occupy top spots in the forestry corruption league table. But, that is a story for another time. It is refreshing to hear the new chief minister of Sarawak, Tan Sri Adenan Satem, warning illegal loggers that stern action would be taken against them and that he would not tolerate corruption in his administration. I am not, in a manner of speaking, about to put the champagne on ice, and neither am I holding my breath. I do not know of any head of government anywhere in the world singing his heart out in praise of corruption. All politicians would have us believe that they are part of the solution. I should like to see the colour of their money first.

Returning to Pahang, I wonder why enforcement agencies who are paid to prevent these breaches of the law have allowed the situation to get so wildly out of control? The short answer, on the evidence that has long been in the public domain, is that the State of Pahang has been ‘captured’ by influential, almost always, titled crooks with loads of money, howsoever acquired, to seduce greedy and corrupt public officers. If they had only carried out their duties honesty, a great deal of the damage could have been prevented, and the good minister of one million trees would have saved himself a few blushes, and the treasury a lot of money.

 Royal Commission should be set up now to inquire into the state of corruption in the country as a whole. It is in the country’s interest to gauge accurately the true reading of the nation’s corruption barometer, so that we would not be wasting time and money treating symptoms because we have no clear idea of the root causes of corruption in national life.

Indonesia’s Komisi Pemberantasan Korupsi and Abraham Samad:Model for MACC?


November 16, 2014

Indonesia’s Komisi Pemberantasan Korupsi and Abraham Samad: A Model for MACC?

by Johan Jaafar@www.nst.com.my (11-15-14)

Abu Kassim

IT is a spectacle that you will never find at the headquarters of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) at Putrajaya: Scores of reporters on the steps of Komisi Pemberantasan Korupsi.

They are there at all times, waiting for news, tips, reports or to snap pictures of orang tersangka (suspects). When members of the MACC’s Consultation and Prevention Panel (PPPR) were there, we saw a suspect being taken to the headquarters, and many hours later, taken back to the remand centre. He wore a vest that read Tahanan KPK (literally a KPK prisoner).

The Corruption Eradication Commission, better known by its Indonesian acronym KPK, is a force to be reckoned with. It reinvented itself after years of official tolerance on graft during the New Era. One of the most significant changes to Indonesia after the Reformasi was the new power for KPK demanded by the people. The new KPK was born out of that, especially by the political will of the man at the helm, former president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (SBY).The born-again KPK is a tiger with claws and teeth.

Newly-elected President Joko Widodo, or Jokowi, has pledged to ensure a clean cabinet and government and giving a free hand to KPK. He sought KPK’s help to vet potential cabinet appointments, and recently, candidates for the post of Attorney-General. With the mandate to investigate and to prosecute, KPK is a corruption agency one does not want to mess with.

My panel was told of the three strategies adopted by KPK of late: To uphold legal supremacy, creating deterrence and shock therapy, and to recover stolen money and assets of the corrupt.

It has slightly more than 1,000 staff to combat corruption in the fourth populousAbraham Samad nation in the world. And more so, one that is perceived as facing chronic corruption problems and negative on the international corruption perception index. But things are changing, thanks to the ferocity of the man at the helm, Abraham Samad, whose reputation as a graft buster is a stuff of legend. He is seen as the graft exterminator extraordinaire, going after the sharks as well as ikan bilis (small fries).

Last year, they investigated a total of 81 cases involving ministers, judges, civil servants, corporate chiefs and others. At least 59 of those cases were regarded as “high-profile.”

Yet, KPK has its detractors. There are those who believe that many of the high-profile cases are merely publicity stunts for the public. There is talk that KPK chooses to deny the rights of suspects in favour of the media blitz. And as the case of reporters at its doorsteps, to keep KPK “alive” and in the public sphere at all times.

KPK realises that the war is not easy to win. Giri Supradiono, the Director of gratification, admits that corruptors are fighting back by trying to weaken the provisions in certain laws. He realises that the slow pace of bureaucratic and judicial reforms is affecting KPK’s effectiveness.He believes the people can make the difference. As manifested by the fund created by common people to build a headquarters for KPK, people are by and large with them.

The campaign Koin untuk KPK (coin for KPK) collected about RM132,000, hardly enough to erect a flyover in the heart of Jakarta not to mention erecting a building. But the symbolism matters. Giri believes non-governmental organisations play a critical role to help KPK. Indonesia Corruption Watch (ICW) is one, run by mostly young, idealistic volunteers trying to clean Indonesia of the scourge.

ade irawanAde Irawan, 37, its coordinator, is a portrait of diligence and determination, leading ICW as one of the region’s most respected NGOs on corruption monitoring. Do not be misled by his boyish look, he fears no one but is feared by all.

Campaigns like berani jujur hebat (dare to be honest is good), anti-corruption festival and integrity movie festivals are meant to create awareness, especially among the young. ICW believes that they are not replicating KPK’s work, in fact, they are complementing each other.

Members of the PPPR panel believe that there are areas that we can learn from both KPK and ICW. Besides our curiosity about the presence of reporters at all times on the steps of KPK headquarters, we were also struck by the tagline adopted by the commission: Bangun negeri tanpa korupsi (building a nation without corruption).In developing countries, that should be the crusade against corruption.

To the so-called Malay Defenders: Stop Insulting the Malays


November 15, 2014

To the so-called Malay Defenders: Stop Insulting the Malays

by Dr. Azmi Sharom

Azmi SharomI find it amusing that those who label themselves as the defenders of Malays are also the ones who, whether consciously or not, view Malay people in a most disdainful manner.

Ideally of course, one would not have to write about topics such as this, but the reality is that ethnicity is still a major issue in any discussion on politics, society, religion, law and governance in Malaysia.

 And even on a personal level, although ethnicity plays a tiny part in my life, in the sense that it is not something that pre-occupies me, I would be lying to say that it has no effect on my life at all.

I was, after all, raised in a Malay family, and my cultural practices are based on Malay culture. Thus, when ethnicity is mentioned, it is always at the back of my mind that I am Malay.

This being the case, when reading comments made by these “Malay defenders”, I must then be a very weak, intellectually challenged, spiritually infantile, economically dependent and all-round pathetic human being.

I am unable to make any choices of my own regarding religious matters. I must be shown the way by people who declare themselves more able to determine what is spiritually good for me.

I must remember always that my capabilities as a man are worth nothing. I can’t take care of myself and my loved ones based on my own talents, strengths and merit.

Instead, I must always depend on a BN, sorry, an UMNO government. Without it, I will just die, I suppose. I have no ability to make any sort of political change. The only people who can change the government are the Chinese.

I am obviously unable to come to the conclusion that when one party has been in power for too long, their arrogance and lust for power then lead to poor governance that affects all Malaysians.

I also believe in stone-aged-style superstition, one which tells me that touching dogs can lead to tornadoes. So, who thinks Malays are so pathetic?Who says the things which imply all the statements above? It is the great Malay defenders of Malaysia.

Really, as a man who identifies himself as culturally Malay, I wish they would stop defending me because all they are doing is insulting me and pissing me off.

 http://www.rakyattimes.com/index.php/columnist/1458-am-i-so-intellectually-challenged-i-need-defending-dr-azmi-sharom