PKR, doing a fine job of crushing dreams


July 30, 2014

Message to Anwar Ibrahim and Cohorts

PKR, doing a fine job of crushing dreams

After pledging to effect political reform, all PKR has succeeded in doing in Selangor is plunge it into chaos, making it the laughing stock of the nation.

“Many voters today concede that their vote for PKR was a mistake as they have been forced to put up with a ‘comedy of errors’ literally, with the operative word here being ‘errors’, in the last one year.”-Fernandez.

COMMENT

July 29, 2014

Dear PKR leaders,

AzizahWhat happened to Ubah sebelum Parah?

I am a Selangor resident who unashamedly and proudly voted for PKR in the last two general elections.I voted for reforms, a better Selangor and a “new Malaysia” after being sick and tired of the UMNO brand of politics.

Today after six years, my fellow voters in Selangor will agree that many of us are disillusioned with the state of affairs both in Selangor and within PKR. The party’s many instances of infighting, the practice of nepotism, the abuse of power among their power crazy leaders and the sheer lack of strategy and direction have left many voters wondering what happened to their dream of change that was promised.

The Kajang Move was an excellent example of a poorly thought through strategy. It was doomed to fail from the start. This is a typical case of a blind “de facto leader” who only seems to be promoting his personal interests while indulging in self-glorification (He only wants to be the Prime Minister of Malaysia).

Whilst the prudent financial management of the state’s coffers is commendable, the irony is that the Menteri Besar has failed to address basic issues that matter most to voters. Poor rubbish collection, water shortages, increases in the cost of living, poor public transportation, clogged drains and filthy eateries are just some of the issues voters face on a daily basis.

Many voters today concede that their vote for PKR was a mistake as they have been forced to put up with a ‘comedy of errors’ literally, with the operative word here being ‘errors’, in the last one year.

The writing on the wall is clear.

Abe's StatueUnless PKR has the political will to reform itself and address critical issues affecting the daily lives of the people of Selangor, it can rest assured it will not retain power in Selangor in the next elections. This would be extremely sad as many of us in the state had places our hopes on CHANGE-UBAH.

Let me conclude with a thought-provoking quote from President Abraham Lincoln that should serve as a reminder to our leaders from both sides of the political divide.” You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.”

*W. Fernandez is a FMT reader.

US penalises Malaysia for shameful human trafficking record


June 23, 2014

COMMENT: Malaysia’s Human Trafficking Record

Congratulations to the Ministry of Home Affairs, The Inspector-General of Police of the Royal Malaysianimage Police and related agencies under the charge of Home Minister Dato’ Seri Dr. Zahid Hamidi on our human trafficking record.  Tier 3 is not bad; we could have been worse. As a reward, we deserve what is due to us in terms of likely punitive actions from Najib’s strategic partner, the Obama Administration, for doing a brilliant job that has enabled us to join the ranks of Zimbabwe, North Korea and Saudi Arabia.

Frankly, coming after the MH370 debacle, this downgrade is another blemish to our image. But aren’t we  known for shooting overselves in the foot! I wonder what our beloved Prime Minister would say if he should meet President Obama again. I suspect the answer would likely be: “Mr President, we are doing about our best and given this downgrade by the State Department, you can be assured that we will be double our efforts in fighting this scourge.”–Din Merican

US penalises Malaysia for shameful human trafficking record

Continued failure to curb traffickers prompts US to downgrade Malaysia in its annual Trafficking in Persons report

by Kate Hodal @ the guardian.com, Friday 20 June 2014 13.59 BST

The US has downgraded Malaysia to the lowest ranking in its annual human trafficking report, relegating the southeast Asian nation to the same category as Zimbabwe, North Korea and Saudi Arabia. The move could result in economic sanctions and loss of development aid.

Malaysia’s relegation to tier 3 in the US state department’s Trafficking in Persons (TiP) report – published on Friday – indicates that the country has categorically failed to comply with the most basic international requirements to prevent trafficking and protect victims within its borders.

Human rights activists in Malaysia and abroad welcomed the downgrade as proof of the government’s lax law enforcement, and lack of political will, in the face of continued NGO and media reports on trafficking and slavery.

“Malaysia is not serious about curbing human trafficking at all,” said Aegile Fernandez, Director of Tenaganita, a local charity that works directly with trafficking victims. The order of the day is profits and corruption. Malaysia protects businesses, employers and agents [not victims] – it is easier to arrest, detain, charge and deport the migrant workers so that you protect employers and businesses.”

According to this year’s TiP report – which ranks 188 nations according to their willingness and efforts to combat trafficking, and is considered the benchmark index for global anti-trafficking commitments – trafficking victims are thought to comprise the vast majority of Malaysia’s estimated 2 million illegal migrant labourers, who are sent to work in the agriculture, construction, sex, textile or domestic labour industries.

Many of the victims are migrants who have willingly come to Malaysia from neighbouring countries like Indonesia, Burma, Cambodia and Bangladesh, attracted by Malaysia’s large supply of jobs and high regional wages. But once in Malaysia they fall prey to forced labour at the hands of their employers, recruitment companies or organised crime syndicates, who refuse payment, withhold their documents or force them into indentured servitude.

The Malaysian government has continuously failed to provide basic rights protections to migrant workers and instead has created a system where unscrupulous labour brokers, corrupt police and abusive employers can have a field day,” says Phil Robertson, Asia’s Deputy Director of Human Rights Watch.

Refugees are particularly vulnerable to trafficking within Malaysia’s borders, the report states, as the government does not grant them formal refugee status or allow them to work legally. As a result, many of the 10,000 refugee Filipino muslim children who reside in the Sabah region are subjected to forced begging, while reports of abuse, detainment and torture by Malaysian traffickers of Rohingya Muslims fleeing persecution in western Burma made headlines earlier this year.

“When you Google ‘Malaysia’, it’s among the five worst countries for refugees,” said Lia Syed, Executive Director of the Malaysia Social Research Insitute, which supports refugees. “There is no policy for refugees in Malaysia at all. They are not recognised, they do not have legal status, they are just considered illegal migrants. It doesn’t matter what country they come from, what their story is, they do not get any support officially from the government.”

Malaysia’s downgrade to tier 3 is an automatic relegation after four years on the tier 2 watchlist and it is the third time in seven years that the country has sunk to the lowest ranking.The downgrade is likely to be seen as a considerable blow to Malaysia’s image and is sure to strain diplomatic relations. Malaysia is a strategic US partner in President Barack Obama’s “pivot” to the east, with the US serving as Malaysia’s largest foreign investor and fourth-largest trading partner.

The downgrade could spell economic sanctions and restrictions on US foreign assistance and access to institutions like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. However, such punishments can be waived under national security considerations.

While Malaysia has increased its preventative efforts against trafficking via public service announcements, there were fewer identifications of trafficking victims, fewer prosecutions and fewer convictions this year than in 2012, the report stated, with poor victim treatment posing a “significant impediment” to successful prosecutions. Authorities not only failed to investigate cases brought to them by NGOs, they also failed to recognised victims or indications of trafficking, and instead treated cases as immigration violations. Some immigration officials were also accused of being involved in the smuggling of trafficking victims, yet the government did not investigate any such potential individuals or cases.

“Unfortunately Malaysia’s victim care regime is fundamentally flawed,” said Luis C deBaca, the ranking state department official for combating trafficking. He pointed to Malaysia’s use of detention centres for people, mainly young women, identified as having been trafficked into the country for illegal purposes.

 “Malaysia has a strong focus on getting rid of illegal aliens rather than a progressive compassionate response to its many victims of trafficking. There has been lots of promised future action but no signs of things happening on the ground to deal with their significant problems,” he said.

 Key recommendations issued by the US included amending the current anti-trafficking law to allow victims to travel, work and reside outside government facilities, and increasing efforts to investigate, prosecute and punish any public officials who might profit from trafficking or exploiting victims.

Malaysia’s Deputy Home Minister, Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar, said earlier this year that the country was in a “very difficult position” as it knew it needed to increase trafficking victims’ rights, yet it didn’t want to encourage illegal migration to its borders.”

“If we allow these people to start working, everybody will start coming here,” Wan Junaidi told reporters after a conference on human trafficking.


 

“When you Google ‘Malaysia’, it’s among the five worst countries for refugees,” said Lia Syed, executive director of the Malaysia Social Research Insitute, which supports refugees. “There is no policy for refugees in Malaysia at all. They are not recognised, they do not have legal status, they are just considered illegal migrants. It doesn’t matter what country they come from, what their story is, they do not get any support officially from the government.”

 

Malaysia’s downgrade to tier 3 is an automatic relegation after four years on the tier 2 watchlist and it is the third time in seven years that the country has sunk to the lowest ranking.

 

The downgrade is likely to be seen as a considerable blow to Malaysia’s image and is sure to strain diplomatic relations. Malaysia is a strategic US partner in President Barack Obama’s “pivot” to the east, with the US serving as Malaysia’s largest foreign investor and fourth-largest trading partner.

 

The downgrade could spell economic sanctions and restrictions on US foreign assistance and access to institutions like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. However, such punishments can be waived under national security considerations.

 

While Malaysia has increased its preventative efforts against trafficking via public service announcements, there were fewer identifications of trafficking victims, fewer prosecutions and fewer convictions this year than in 2012, the report stated, with poor victim treatment posing a “significant impediment” to successful prosecutions. Authorities not only failed to investigate cases brought to them by NGOs, they also failed to recognised victims or indications of trafficking, and instead treated cases as immigration violations. Some immigration officials were also accused of being involved in the smuggling of trafficking victims, yet the government did not investigate any such potential individuals or cases.

 

“Unfortunately Malaysia’s victim care regime is fundamentally flawed,” said Luis CdeBaca, the ranking state department official for combating trafficking. He pointed to Malaysia’s use of detention centres for people, mainly young women, identified as having been trafficked into the country for illegal purposes.

 

“Malaysia has a strong focus on getting rid of illegal aliens rather than a progressive compassionate response to its many victims of trafficking. There has been lots of promised future action but no signs of things happening on the ground to deal with their significant problems,” he said.

 

Key recommendations issued by the US included amending the current anti-trafficking law to allow victims to travel, work and reside outside government facilities, and increasing efforts to investigate, prosecute and punish any public officials who might profit from trafficking or exploiting victims.

 

Malaysia’s deputy home minister, Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar, said earlier this year that the country was in a “very difficult position” as it knew it needed to increase trafficking victims’ rights, yet it didn’t want to encourage illegal migration to its borders.

 

“If we allow these people to start working, everybody will start coming here,” Wan Junaidi told reporters after a conference on human trafficking.

 

Wajarkah Tengku Adnan Rob Malay Businesses ?


June 22, 2012

WAJARKAH TENGKU ADNAN ROB MALAY BUSINESSES?

dinmericanby Din Merican

On  June 6, 2014, Utusan Malaysia exploded a story about Sultan Johor’s interference in the Johor State Assembly (Dewan Undangan Negeri) by seeking to have executive control over the Johor Housing Board. The headline was a simple “WAJARKAH?”:

Utusan Malaysia then unfolded the real story. The real disaffection with Sultan Johor was that His Highness was seen as getting involved in businesses including selling large valuable parcels of lands in Johor to Singaporeans and lately to developers from China. This was further incensed by the fact that Malaysian billionaire tycoon Tan Sri Francis Yeoh of the YTL Group had made very damaging and insulting statements against the Malay leadership in the government accusing it of crony capitalism whereas it was a public secret that the YTL Group was the biggest beneficiary of Dr Mahathir’s privatisation policy. The TNB Employees Union then exposed that Sultan Johor’s power company SIPP was the JV partner of the YTL Group in the Pengerang IPP (independent power producer) project.

The Sultan of Johore's sale of 116-acres of prime land in Johor Bahru last December to China developers Guangzhou R&F last year as a major turning point. BN upset with royal housing bill too 01 The deal pocketed the Sultan RM4.5 billion.  The Sultan of Johore's sale of 116-acres of prime land in Johor Bahru last December to China developers Guangzhou R&F last year as a major turning point. BN upset with royal housing bill too 01 The deal pocketed the Sultan RM4.5 billion.

The Sultan of Johore’s sale of 116-acres of prime land in Johor Bahru last December to China developers Guangzhou R&F last year as a major turning point.
BN upset with royal housing bill too.
The deal pocketed the Sultan RM4.5 billion. 

So, the whole thing was really about UMNO’s anger towards Sultan Johor’s perceived betrayal by selling out on Malay rights. UMNO may be justified to come out strongly against Sultan Johor. UMNO is justified to chide any Malay Ruler and any GLC that disregards Malay rights. UMNO can do that because it perceives itself as the protector and guardian of Malay rights as guaranteed by the Federal Constitution. That’s what UMNO’s existence is for, and that is what most Malays expect of UMNO. But, is UMNO really the champion of Malays and Malay rights? Or, must the Malays also be protected from the rogues in UMNO?

Beside Johor Sultan, UMNO via Khazanah Nasional Berhad owns one of the largest development land in Johor. And UMNO is selling land at equally crasy rate to foreigners, disguised under the name of “joint development”.

Beside Johor Sultan, UMNO via Khazanah Nasional Berhad owns one of the largest development land in Johor. And UMNO is selling land at equally crasy rate to foreigners, disguised under the name of “joint development”.

For UMNO to regard itself as the Champion of Malay rights, UMNO must also not allow its politicians, its leaders especially the UMNO Ministers to betray and rob legitimate Malay businesses. UMNO must not allow Ministers like Tengku Adnan Mansor who is the Federal Territories Minister to do what is reported in MKini in the story below.

Damai Kiaramas was set up in early 2009 to provide a long-term solution for the former estate workers living on prime land of currently TTDI after their estate was closed down 32 years ago.

Damai Kiaramas was set up in early 2009 to provide a long-term solution for the former estate workers living on prime land of currently TTDI after their estate was closed down 32 years ago.

So, just as Utusan Malaysia had rebuked Sultan Johor by that simple phrase – “WAJARKAH?”, these Malay businessmen would equally be entitled to rebuke Tengku Adnan and ask him : “ WAJARKAH TENGKU ADNAN ROB MALAY BUSINESSES?”

I think it is time that UMNO admonish Tengku Adnan before UMNO loses Malay support in GE14!Now read what Malaysia kini reported below:

UMNO men’s firm gets injunction against Ku Nan

By Hafiz Yatim@www.malaysiakini.com

 A group of bumiputera entrepreneurs today obtained an injunction against Federal Territories Minister and UMNO Secretary-General Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor and two others from being involved in a joint venture project involving a five-hectare plot of land in Bukit Kiara.

Last week, Damai Kiaramas Sdn Bhd, owned by UMNO members, filed a suit in the High Court in Kuala

WAJARKAH TENGKU ADNAN ROB MALAY BUSINESSES?

WAJARKAH TENGKU ADNAN ROB MALAY BUSINESSES?

Lumpur against Tengku Adnan, also known as Ku Nan, for breach of contract. The company claimed it had fulfilled all the conditions set by the ministry to develop the land, including getting the agreement of those living in longhouses in the vicinity for 32 years, to be placed in a mixed development project on the land.

However, the company claimed, Tengku Adnan had favoured a company owned by the Pavilion group to be given the project. Today’s ex-parte injunction was granted by judicial commissioner Kamaluddin Md Said.

Damai Kiaramas named its joint-venture partner Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan, Tengku Adnan and the Pavilion group-owned Memang Perkasa Sdn Bhd as defendants in the suit. They had since 2008 proposed to redevelop the five-hectare land, which was then part of the Bukit Kiara estate, large portions of which have become the Kuala Lumpur Golf Club and Kelab Golf Perkhidmatan Awam.

The displaced estate workers are staying in dilapidated longhouses on the five-hectare plot and pay monthly rental to the Kuala Lumpur City Hall.Damai Kiaramas claimed it had obtained the backing of the then federal territories minister Raja Nong Chik Raja Zainal Abidin and got the cabinet’s support.

Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan agreed to appoint Damai Kiaramas as a joint-venture partner on December 17, 2012, after it obtained signatures from all the longhouse residents to support the project, in which they would be placed in their new houses there.

A draft of the joint-venture company was produced several weeks later stating the terms that included the company having to pay RM60.702 million in land premium to Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan.

A meeting was held between Raja Nong Chik, Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan and Damai Kiaramas on Feb 22, 2013, at which they all agreed to the terms of the agreement and also agreed to the signing of the formal agreement only after the 13th general election.

Several declarations, general damages sought

However, with Raja Nong Chik having lost in the last general election, Damai Kiaramas had to deal with Tengku Adnan, the new minister in charge of the Federal Territories, and they held several meetings, last year and this year.

At subsequent meetings, the statement of claim from the firm states, Tengku Adnan requested that the land premium and return to be paid to Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan, be increased from RM60.702 million to RM96 million. Tengku Adnan allegedly asked that the amount be increased further to RM140 million and then to RM160 million, to which Damai Kiaramas is said to have reluctantly agreed.

The joint-venture agreement between Damai Kiaramas and Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan was formally signed and a copy was sent to the foundation on Sept 17 last year. However, on December 5 last year, Damai Kiaramas obtained a termination notice from Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan, which stated that there was never an agreement between them, that Damai Kiaramas failed to comply with the foundation’s demand and had not presented a detailed development plan.

Damai Kiaramas maintained that it briefed Tengku Adnan and the foundation representative on this on Sept 25 last year. The company claimed the reasons for the termination of the joint-venture agreement came as an after thought, and that it tried to revive the project by agreeing to pay the RM160 million that Tengku Adnan sought for the foundation.

The company also demanded, in April this year, that Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan reveals whether it had entered into an agreement with other companies to develop the project.Damai Kiaramas claimed that all the defendants had hidded from its knowledge that secret negotiations had been carried out with Memang Perkasa and further claimed that there was interference from the firm.

Damai Kiaramas further claimed that because it had agreed to pay the RM160 million as demanded, the joint-venture agreement stands and that the action of the other party amounted to breach of agreement.

Hence, the company is seeking a declaration that the joint-venture agreement dated September 17 last year is constituted and continues, and wants another declaration that the termination notice is set-aside.

Damai Kiaramas also wants Yayasan Wilayah Persekutuan to continue with the joint venture and an order that any agreement that the foundation has with Memang Perkasa should be declared null and void. It is also seeking general damages and any amount the court deems fit for loss of profit and exemplary damages.

READ HERE: by Ida Lim@www.themalaymailonline.com

June 21, 2014

http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/developer-insists-has-funds-for-ttdi-project-labels-ku-nans-claims-prematur

June 19, 2014

http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/ku-nan-shrugs-off-court-injunction-by-developer-says-firm-could-not-perform

On Taiwan


 

June 20, 2014

Taipei, Taiwan

On Taiwan

by Din Merican

image

My wife, Dr. Kamsiah, and I spent the last few days in Taipei and its surrounds and met a number  of her Taiwanese counterparts. We asked them a lot of questions about their history, culture, their economy and government. While my wife was occupied with her course, I was  able to interact with them. Although those  we met and talked to were hampered by their limited English vocabulary and  we have zero knowledge of their language (Mandarin), we are able to understand why they are very proud of their country and its economic success but they are critical of their government. Off the bat, we can say that their society is an open one founded on democracy. They are a very hardworking and disciplined people.

I searched google and found a report from the Heritage Foundation, which confirms our cursory impressions of the country.  See below:

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Paying Tribute to Integrity


June 14, 2014

Paying Tribute to Integrity

by Ahmad Zakie Shariff (received by e-mail)

Like many others of his generation, my late father rejoiced when the Union Jack was lowered, that fateful night in August 1957. We were finally independent and free to set our nation’s future course. He was a simple man of integrity and he admired the great qualities of our Founding Fathers and he passed on that admiration to me.

hj-ahmad-zakieAs I write I am paying tribute to the founding spirit of this nation; a spirit of collective optimism and idealism. True, we may not feature in this year’s World Cup in Brazil (we can still dream, 2030 anyone?), but Malaysia is still a place where people can dream and achieve lofty goals together. United we stand, divided we fall.

But for too long, the economics discipline has understated the critical role of cooperation in economic activity. Emphasis on the individual has risen above all else and overshadowed the profound ways we depend on each other. You may have recently heard a prominent business person say “I did it all myself. I had no help from other quarters.” I want to interrupt that point.

Every successful business venture requires the cooperative effort of many people – the policymaker who believes in the benefits of the project, the banker who believes in the business plan, the customer who believes in the product, the employee who devotes precious time to the business and its owners.

A relationship exists when trust and integrity exists, and when they do, remarkable efficiencies result. Partners are spared a multitude of worries – whether they’ll get paid, whether they’ll get what they think they’re paying for. They are freed to act quickly and with confidence, again and again.

Pervasive integrity is fundamental to our society and the growth of its economy. Integrity, therefore, is not something that’s nice to have. It’s something we have to have.

The dictionary defines integrity as adherence to moral and ethical principles, rectitude, honour, and honesty. These are certainly admirable qualities. But we need to understand integrity as not simply a virtue, but a shared asset that brings social and economic rewards. Sometimes we take integrity for granted. We learn from infancy to count on other people to tell the truth, to keep their promises, and respect the rights of others.

This trusting attitude is ingrained in our culture, learnt from the cradle and accumulated over the years. However in this era, where so much seems to be going wrong, many have lost trust in their fellow citizens. Some of us have lost faith in integrity.

The path forward can’t be to stop trusting. We need to build the trust that will power our nation for decades to come.If mistakes are learning experiences, the painful lesson of recent events that pervaded our nation is that integrity really does matter. Not just to our moral wellbeing but to our economic wellbeing too.

Conventionally, integrity is considered a “behind closed doors” topic: a personal issue, entirely up to the individual. If you are upright, good for you; if not it’s no one else’s affair. We should turn conventional wisdom on its head. The real value of integrity is not personal; it’s collective. It is the underpinning for all our social relationships. We are heirs to a huge stock of integrity, built up over the years by our predecessors and visible in every aspect of our society.

It is a shared asset that has made us quite wealthy.Without integrity, our nation cannot function. There would be no trust, no mega projects, no trading, no credit, no buying and selling. Our oft-praised economy would quickly degenerate into a primitive system, and our nation’s wealth would disappear long with it.

Integrity is collective action.To actually practice integrity, to deal honestly, there has to be someone on the other side of the transaction. That means that to really understand integrity, we have to appreciate it as a relationship of trust.

An example: The Asian financial crisis of 1998 was in my mind, first and foremost, a crisis of integrity. It was by far the biggest economic disruption of my lifetime, more so than the subprime crisis of 2008.  In both crises, the seeds were sown when a number of people sought their own short-term advantage, knowing that they were putting others at risk. There was no thought spared for the collective good.

The things that will destroy us are: politics without principle; pleasure without conscience; wealth without work; knowledge without character; business without morality; science without humanity; and worship without sacrifice.–Mohandas K. Gandhi

In that climate, greed great and small multiplied and spread like potent germs in a warm petri dish. The result of all that integrity and trust unravelling was an economic contraction so profound that it impacted vast populations and diminished wealth around the globe.

It was a wake-up call. Ignoring or, worse, abusing integrity isn’t just unpleasant forGandhi a few bad apples and their unlucky victims. It had profound economic consequences. At stake were the entire regional economic system and our way of life.

There is another way to think about integrity. What if we invested in integrity? What if we took a different approach and focused on “increasing the good stuff that people do” instead of highlighting the scandals, the frauds and the cheatings? What if?

The ultimate point is that if we invest in our collective integrity, we invest in our collective wealth. We can create wealth together in ways that are not possible alone. Despite all the dishonesty, the falsehoods, the cheating and even the outright fraud we’ve seen exposed, there’s actually a lot of integrity left in this world. Without it, financial activity and the vast majority of commerce would stop completely.

Mohandas K. Gandhi once said that there are seven things that will destroy a society – wealth without work; pleasure without conscience; knowledge without character; religion without sacrifice; politics without principles; science without humanity and business without ethics.I agree with the Mahatma. He was cautioning us against the loss of integrity.

Malaysia–A Paradise Lost


June 7, 2014

Malaysia–A Paradise Lost

by Cogito Ergo Sum@http://www.malaysiakini.com

COMMENT: Superficially, Malaysia, for all and sundry, is a nation that is not onlyhype_najib1 doing well, but even thriving in all its endeavours. Foreigners and locals are told that we are a model of tolerance and harmony in a plural society and that others must emulate our ways if they want to succeed.

Unfortunately, even a cursory look at the state of things will give away this lie, so lyrically waxed in the mainstream media. And unless one has access to news portals like Malaysiakini, we would be blissfully ignorant under the onslaught and media blitz of the government controlled media machinery.

For one, we seem to be on a runaway train towards an Islamic state, when the Federal Constitution has overtly stated that we are secular nation.

So-called defenders of the faith and race like ISMA and PDRKASA have become not only very vocal, but also dangerously influential. They promote laws and legal systems that are in opposition to a multi-ethnic and plural society, and is deemed inappropriate for a modern economic system that can compete on an equal footing with our neighbours.

These so-called NGOs, considered to be on the fringes, seem to be getting theirIsma President funding and encore from a benign government that that is even seen as fanning these inciting and seditious pronouncement by its very silence and inaction.

And yet, we have an official propaganda that is portraying our ‘moderation’ and moderate ways to foreigners and foreign investors. But walking the talk is futile as the antics of such official ‘guardians of the faith’ like JAIS, are a stumbling block to this false mirage we are trying to project in a desert of what used to be an oasis of goodwill.

And as if to prepare us for the inevitable, the government has even set up a ‘hudud implementation committee’ for the day when the shariah system becomes law of the land. And if this carries on, we are well on track to go the way of Brunei, Sudan and several other failed states which have adopted hudud laws. And we are a ‘moderate’ nation with moderate policies and people?

Intruders beware

But we are indeed a nation of tolerance. Pushed to the limits of accommodating preferential treatment and affirmative action, Chinese and Indians are declared ‘intruders’ who have no business to have any business or rights as equal human beings.

And despite these provocative and obviously false, seditious accusations by radicals and self-proclaimed ‘fundamentalists’, we have either a mute BN which distinguishes itself  as a multi-racial coalition, or one that is too stupefied to respond decisively.

Newspapers that are unofficial mouthpieces of the authorities like Utusan Malaysia have a penchant of publishing rubbish and peddling it as sacrosanct news. Racial and religious slurs are printed and sold as if it is bread butter of the nation. Yet, the authorities are impotent or choose to be, against such slurs and often given official sanction by remaining dumb and unresponsive to such blatant lies. The tolerance and moderation, unfortunately is from the victims of such hate-filled messages.

Our Education system sucks

Bakri Musa's BookA serious flaw in the fundamentals of this nation is the education system. Our school system and education promotes learning by rote and regurgitating facts for examinations. No attempt is made to foster critical thinking and questioning of subject matter. Facts of history, and now even geography, are being manipulated to fit a distinct political agenda.Well accepted historical facts have been altered and even changed to leave out pertinent points of history that made this nation once great.

The roles of our forefathers like the late Tan Cheng Lock and VT Sambanthan are either missing or dealt with in passing. These men (and many women) played an integral part in getting the British to give us independence.And it was the Malay, Chinese and Indian Police officers whot beat the communists in a urban and guerrilla warfare.

No one race could have achieved this as Malaysia became the only nation to beat the BRAIN DRAINmovement in open combat. No other country has achieved this in the history of warfare.By the time students reach universities, their language skills in English can only be described as atrocious. Research papers and standard texts are written in the English language.

An erstwhile student in at a university is required to not only know the current trends in whatever fields he or she is pursing, but also critically evaluate such studies. That ability to valuate studies by others is a critical component in the pursuit of higher learning. Learning by rote and spewing out wrong facts at public exams are of no use in evaluating research papers because it does not require thinking. And the vicious cycle goes on when these graduates become teachers themselves. Results have shown that our students performance in science and mathematics is among the poorest in Asia.

We need a revolutionary education system to set thing right. A system that will ‘uneducate’ our children from the current ‘copy and paste’ mentality so prevalent that the word plagiarism is as alien as the concept of unity in diversity.

Economic descent

From a house of plenty, we have now become a nation of borrowers. Our household debt is at its peak at 80 percent. Families in urban areas find it impossible to meet ends and unless you are a favoured despot, you will find yourself drowning in a sea of personal debt.

Poverty cuts across racial and religious barriers. Despite government efforts to prop up the rural population, the urban Malays are finding it hard to meet the expenses of daily city life.

The sheer weight of managing and balancing a domestic budget is actually a microcosm of the national economy.Our current account (money received from imports minus the money that goes out for exports) has fallen.

Malaysia's Current Acc to GDP RatioAnd the figure has been steadily falling according to numbers released by the Department of Statistics, Malaysia since the year 2004 (see chart above).

John Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’, is an epic poem of the fall of man. Like the Garden of Eden, Malaysia was once an advanced and prosperous nation in not just Southeast Asia, but Asia. But sin crept into Paradise and it all was lost. And like Eden, we have allowed corruption, decay and prejudice to destroy the once paradisiacal state we were in.

In his poem, Milton painted the devil in such colourful language, that some haveMilton's epic poems even argued that Satan was the hero in ‘Paradise Lost’! And, much like Milton’s Eden, we seem to have fallen to the devilish ways of religious and racial bigotry that is transforming us, from the proverbial paradise, to a living hell on earth … for the average person.

One is left to contemplate if there is a way out of this runaway train that we have seemingly boarded. Will sanity, in the end prevail and will there be economic, social and political salvation? Milton pointed to a new future with his second epic poem entitled ‘Paradise Regained’.

As Malaysians, we have a duty to regain that lost paradise. We owe it to the next generation and the generations to come so that the story of Malaysia will be remembered as one of victory over darkness, of good over evil, of sanity over insanity and of one of moderation over extremism.

Let us not end up as an epic tragedy.