4-Star General of RCAF Dr. Nem Sowath–Alumnus of the University of Cambodia


January 11, 2017

4-Star General Dr. Nem Sowath–Soldier, Author, Intellectual and Alumnus of the University of Cambodia

The University of Cambodia is naturally proud to present a brief video on  His Excellency General Dr. Nem Sowath of The  Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF). He is a role model for young Cambodians of the present generation.

Dr. Nem is a historian, soldier diplomat, political scientist, and a distinguished alumnus who has written two books on His Excellency  Prime Minister Samdech Techo Hun Sen and His Excellency Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defence, General Tea Banh. The General also attended post doctoral programmes at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and The National University of Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. –Din Merican

Merry Xmas to All


December 18, 2016

Merry Xmas to All

From Dr. Kamsiah Haider and Din Merican

Our Message is intended for All, those Islamic idiots  and bigots in Malaysia be damned. Let there be Peace and Love for all of you– Dr. Kamsiah Haider in Kuala Lumpur and Din Merican in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

 

Tunku Mahkota of Johor lambasts MARA Chairman Annuar Musa


December 18, 2016

Tunku Mahkota of Johor lambasts MARA Chairman Annuar Musa

http://www.malaysia-chronicle.com

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Recently, there was a statement made by a Tan Sri, urging that football shouldn’t be run through proxies and that I should decide and make a decision on taking the job or not. To me, the best would be to let the affiliates and the fans decide on what is best for Malaysian football. First of all, I don’t need to take advice from a leader who have failed to lead.

Whenever a football club or a company faces financial problems, it is called mismanagement. It also ultimately reflects on the leader. When you were in the position where you had numerous sponsors, you should have used that opportunity to clear all your debts. Instead, you made the executive decision to employ a new foreign coach as well as 3 additional foreign players. With this decision, the ones who fell victim were the local players as they didn’t receive their salaries. Priority should be given to the local players and not the foreigners. It clearly shows that you overpaid these foreigners and as a result, you were not able to sustain the club.

It did not end here. Kelantan’s performance began to deteriorate and it was evident that the ship was sinking. To make things worse as a leader, you chose to abandon the ship leaving them to suffer. And it’s embarrassing when in that situation, you still have the desire to be FAM’s President.

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The Boss  (pic right) and his kaki ampu

So my advice to you is, concentrate on your political work. You are a very seasoned and senior politician and we respect the work that you’ve done. Hence, please focus on your political obligations and may you be able to clear the mess and scandal in Mara. Let’s leave it to the people to decide on what is best for Malaysian football.

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Football did not give me any benefits. It’s just the sport that i love. The difference between me and certain individuals is they serve a political ideology and for their own personal interests. I serve the people.

HRH Brigadier General Tunku Ismail Ibni Sultan Ibrahim, Crown Prince of Johor

 

Congratulations to the People of Thailand


December 3, 2016

Congratulations to the People of Thailand

by AFP

Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn becomes Rama X of Thailand’s Chakri Dynasty, but will not formally be crowned until after his father’s cremation, which is expected next year.

King-Rama

Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn became the King of Thailand late Thursday, opening a new chapter for the powerful monarchy in a country still mourning the death of his father.

The 64-year-old Prince inherits one of the world’s richest monarchies as well as a politically febrile nation, 50 days after King Bhumibol Adulyadej’s death.

After weeks of complex palace protocols the Prince was invited by the head of the National Legislative Assembly (NLA) to ascend the throne in an event broadcast on all Thai television channels.

“I agree to accept the wishes of the late King… for the benefit of the entire Thai people,” said Vajiralongkorn, wearing an official white tunic decorated with medals and a pink sash.

The sombre, ritual-heavy ceremony at his Bangkok palace was attended by the Chief of the NLA, junta leader Prayut Chan-O-Cha, and the powerful 96-year-old head of the privy council, Prem Tinsulanonda.

Red-jacketed courtiers looked on as a palace staff member, shuffling on his knees, presented the new King with a microphone through which he delivered his few words of acceptance.

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His Majesty King Vajiralongkorn then prostrated himself, hands pressed together in respect, to a small shrine topped by a picture of his father and mother —Her Majesty Queen Sirikit Kitiyakara.

He becomes Rama X of Thailand’s Chakri dynasty, but will not formally be crowned until after his father’s cremation, which is expected next year.

Bhumibol’s reign, which ended on October 13, spanned a tumultuous period of Thai history pockmarked by a communist insurgency, coups and street protests.

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It also saw breakneck development which has resulted in a huge wealth disparity between a Bangkok-centric elite and the rural poor.To many Thais, Bhumibol was the only consistent force in a politically combustible country, his image burnished by ritual and shielded by a harsh royal defamation law.

The United States offered its congratulations to the new King, saying it looked forward to strengthening ties with Thailand. “We offer our best wishes to his majesty and all of the Thai people,” the State Department said.

“His father, King Bhumibol, ruled the Kingdom of Thailand with vision and compassion for 70 years and was a great friend of the United States. The United States and Thailand enjoy a longstanding, strong, and multifaceted bilateral relationship, and we look forward to deepening that relationship and strengthening the bonds between our two countries and peoples going forward.”

Into the limelight

Monks chanted blessings at Buddhist temples to mark the new monarch’s ascension — an era-defining moment for most Thais who for seven decades knew only Bhumibol as their King.

His Majesty Vajiralongkorn does not yet enjoy the same level of popularity.He spends much of his time outside of the public eye, particularly in southern Germany where he owns property.

He has had three high-profile divorces, while a recent police corruption scandal linked to the family of his previous wife allowed the public a rare glimpse of palace affairs.

Thursday’s ascension ends a period of uncertainty since Bhumibol’s death prompted by the Prince’s request to delay his official proclamation so he could mourn with the Thai people.

Thailand’s constitutional monarchy has limited formal powers but it draws the loyalty of much of the kingdom’s business elite as well as a military that dominates politics through its regular coups.

Analysts say  His Majesty King Vajiralongkorn, untested until now, will have to manage competing military cliques.

In a brief televised address after the ceremony, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-O-Cha, who as army chief led the 2014 coup, praised the new King “as the head of the Thai state and heart of the Thai people.”

The Thai monarchy is protected from criticism by one of the world’s strictest lese majeste laws, carrying up to 15 years in jail for every charge of defaming the King, Queen, heir or regent.

That law makes open discussion about the Royal Family’s role all but impossible inside the Kingdom and means all media based inside the country routinely self-censor. Convictions for so-called “112” offences — named after its criminal code — have skyrocketed since the Generals seized power in 2014.

Experts say most have targeted the junta’s political opponents, many of whom support the toppled civilian government of Yingluck Shinawatra.

The emergence of Yingluck’s brother Thaksin in 2001, a vote-winning billionaire seen by many of the rural poor as their champion, prompted the recent round of political conflict. The army and royalist establishment have toppled two governments led by the siblings, accusing them of nepotism and corruption.