Much Ado over the word “Alleged”– But Missing Dean’s Message


March 18, 2017

Much Ado over the word “Alleged— But Missing Dean’s Message

by Dean Johns @www.malaysiakini.com

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The Alleged Malaysian Official No. 1 who allegedly stole Billions of Ringgit from 1MDB

Many readers have complained about what they see as the over-use of the word ‘alleged’ in the alleged columns that allegedly appear in Malaysiakini under my alleged name. And I sympathise with these critics in the sense that constant over-use of ‘alleged’ or indeed any other word can be very tedious.

But in my own defence I have to say that a good many appearances of ‘alleged’ in my columns are there by courtesy of my long-suffering sub-editors, in their ceaseless attempts to lend some sense of journalistic propriety to my practice of accusing members of Malaysia’s UMNO-BN regime of crimes of which, despite apparently overwhelming evidence, they have not, at least so far, been proven guilty.

Far from convicted, in fact, most have never even tried, investigated or identified as suspects, or even, for that matter, have even admitted that the crimes I and others allege against them have ever actually occurred.

As, for example, in the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) case, which the court of public opinion and a good many legal jurisdictions around the world regard as a monstrous swindle and money-laundering scam, but whose alleged mastermind, Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak aka Malaysian Official 1 or MO1 and his alleged accomplices and supporters claim is entirely free of any shred of irregularity or impropriety, let alone criminality.

A situation that explains why I have to plead guilty of frequently pre-empting my sub-editors by personally employing, and in the process arguably over-employing, the word ‘alleged’ for the purpose of making the point that there is no evidence, let alone proof, that any of the UMNO-BN regime’s alleged agencies of alleged government can be accused of honestly carrying-out its sworn duty.

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Malaysia’s Attorney-General who allegedly cleared Malaysia’s Prime Minister, Najib Razak of any wrongdoing over RM2.6 billion of 1MDB money that went to the latter’s personal bank account

There’s precious little or no proof, for example, that the alleged Royal Malaysian Police Force properly performs its function of impartially and equally enforcing the laws of the land and protecting the populace, as it is evidently far too busy protecting the interests, allegedly criminal and otherwise, of the regime that effectively owns it.

Just as there is lamentably little evidence for the proposition that the alleged judiciary administers the laws, either criminal or civil, for the benefit of the Malaysian people at large.

Especially in light of the fact that an Attorney-General (AG) who some time ago showed signs of intending to investigate the 1MDB can of worms was summarily ‘retired’ in favour of a successor who immediately decided that allegations against Najib/MO1 and his fellow suspects were false and without foundation.

Similarly, the alleged ‘journalists’ of Malaysia’s alleged mainstream ‘news’ media can never be suspected or accused of performing their professional duty of reporting the news without fear or favour, or indeed of reporting anything at all that might inconvenience, embarrass or more likely incriminate the ruling regime.

Image result for Malaysia's Attorney General The Pious Saudi Royals who were allegedly donated RM2.6 billion to the Malaysian Prime Minister, Najib Razak

While the regime’s alleged ‘religious’ authorities, for their part, persistently support UMNO’s alleged, indeed all-too-obviously false claim to be the ‘defender’ of Islam, despite the regime’s routinely committing such excesses of corruption and criminality as to disgrace Islam or any other alleged ‘faith’.

And the alleged Electoral Commission (EC) is apparently on a mission to avoid even the hint of any suggestion that it might honestly perform its function of ensuring relatively equal numbers of voters across electorates, as specifically required by the constitution, let alone polls free of bribery or other forms of rigging in the regime’s favour.

Indeed, the alleged EC is so extremely biased toward UMNO-BN that the current alleged government, since it lost the majority vote in the 2013 general election, can arguably be considered not guilty of actually being legitimately in power at all.

Preferring a more presidential role?

 Prime minister Najib Razak has denied accusations that he stole money from state fund 1MDB.
Prime Minister Najib Razak has denied accusations that he alledgly stole money from state fund 1MDB. Allegedly  Pious Muslim. Photograph: Fazry Ismail/EPA

And as far as many of us are concerned, Najib Abdul Razak is only allegedly Prime Minister of the country, as he clearly prefers playing a more presidential role in which he seldom deigns to attend Parliament, and he and his alleged ministers are protected from replying to questions by an alleged speaker who perceives his function solely in terms of preventing the alleged opposition from speaking.

Speaking of speaking, I suspect that at least some of the readers of Malaysiakini who allege that ‘allege’ appears far too often in my alleged columns are themselves only allegedly regular, honest Malaysians.

In other words, a great many anonymous alleged readers, to judge by the low standard of their alleged English and the idiocy and suspicious uniformity of their alleged ‘opinions’, are actually so-called ‘cybertroopers’, or in other words paid propagandists, or, if you prefer, propagandistutes, for UMNO-BN’s alleged ‘government’.

Admittedly, of course, it could be alleged that my ceaseless allegations against UMNO-BN and its members and minions could be nothing but figments of my alleged imagination, and evidence of a tendency to paranoia into the bargain.

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Kevin Morais who was allegedly murdered

It’s altogether possible, of course. But, as boring as all my alleging may be to some, I can’t bring myself to either apologise for this practice or to allege that I intend to engage in it any less.

After all, I owe it to myself as a genuine rather than merely alleged writer, and even more so to you as a truly rather than allegedly respectable and intelligent reader, to go right on expressing my allergy to UMNO-BN’s countless alleged Ali Babas and their ridiculous alleged alibis.


DEAN JOHNS, after many years in Asia, currently lives with his Malaysian-born wife and daughter in Sydney, where he coaches and mentors writers and authors and practises as a writing therapist. Published books of his columns for Malaysiakini include ‘Mad about Malaysia’, ‘Even Madder about Malaysia’, ‘Missing Malaysia’, ‘1Malaysia.con’ and ‘Malaysia Mania’.

 

Scandal ridden UMNO Malay Leadership


February 3, 2017

Scandal ridden UMNO Malay Leadership

http://www.asiasentinel.com/society/malaysia-scholars-fault-umno/

Malay Scholars Find Fault in Malay Leaders

Malaysian Official No. 1–The Corrupt and Corruptor

The United Malays National Organization (UMNO) presents itself as the guardian of Malay interests, culture and language. So what do the 1MDB and other scandals say about the fundamental problems of this long-dominant ruling party, the institutional arm of the Malay elite?

The disappearance of vast sums from the accounts of the state-backed 1MDB investment vehicle, the murder of a senior investigator, the murder by the Prime Minister’s security detail of a pregnant Mongolian translator/model and former girlfriend of Najib’s close associate, must say something about elite behavior.

They may be extreme events but by no means unique in Malaysian history over the past 40 years. What were then vast sums went down similar drains, more than one associated with Bank Bumiputra, including the murder in Hong Kong of an auditor doing his job too well. Plenty of other lesser financial scandals have emerged from specifically Malay, publicly-owned institutions supposedly created to benefit the rakyat but too often ATMs for the elite. They are mostly quickly forgiven and forgotten.

Rather than looking for a contemporary or political analysis of the causes of these various scandals, it is worth casting a glance back at how some well-known Malay intellectuals in the past saw their Malay leaders. Two examples, separated by 140 years, will have to suffice.

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The more recent, written in 1982, appears in Shaharuddin B Maaruf’s Concept of a Hero in Malay Society tracing the influences on the Malay elite from the epic of Hang Tuah to the later era where feudal loyalty was allied with a crass materialism. Some of the feudal traits exhibited by Hang Tuah (and by equivalents at the Javanese Majapahit court) included feats of drinking, gambling, hunting and lovemaking. Do they still dominate?

 Interestingly Shaharuddin singled out not a Malaysian but the martyred Philippine nationalist Jose Rizal and General Sudirman, Indonesia’s military leader in the war of independence, as the wider modern Malay world’s leaders as selfless, determined and principled. In contrast, he quoted the principal agent of British imperialism on the peninsula, Frank Swettenham, on the eagerness of the Malay rulers to accept British overlordship in return for position and income.
Image result for dr shaharuddin maarufA Contemporary UMNO Leader

Shaharuddin himself echoed other post-independence critics of the elite such as Syed Hussein Alatas, the Malay academician turned politician who became Vice-Chancellor of the University of Malaya and a founder of Gerakan, a multi-ethnic, reformist party. Alatas wrote the Foreword to Shaharuddin’s book.

They both noted the conflict between the feudal values of the elite, seen in their devotion to hierarchy, show and dynasty, and the Islam it professed. Instead of acknowledging that Islam’s strength lay in the diversity of interpretation of the Koran, it insisted on a single one laid down by an intellectually bereft elite, more interested in the furtherance of narrow Malay racial interests than in religion. Personal loyalty to a leader also trumped laws and principles.

There was, wrote Shaharuddin “no genuine interest on the part of the Malay elite to foster the intellectual, humanitarian and scientific aspects of Islam … but only to organize Koran reading competitions” – a stark contrast to the days when Islam was at the forefront of intellectual and scientific advance.

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 Present Day Malay Heroin Rosmah ‘Birkin’ Mansor

Reading about the shopping sprees of Najib’s wife Rosmah Mansor, of the spending of huge sums to join the celebrity crowd in New York, mansions in California, Hollywood movies and high-priced western paintings suggests that elite behavior has got even worse since Shaharuddin wrote more than a generation ago: “The spirit of indulgence leads it [the elite] to imitate the negative aspects of western culture while the scientific and intellectual tradition is discarded… Being indulgent and imitative, the Malay elite always seeks to identify itself with its western counterpart.”

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Nor was it just a problem of aping western ways. Another was the desire to be grandiose and showy. “They spend lavishly on buildings, cars, official functions and other expenditures for prestige.”

Worse still, “celebrity worship is widespread in Malay society” – as if foretelling the elite urge to be seen in the company of such trashy western celebrities as Paris Hilton.

Shaharuddin’s criticisms were however mild compared with those of Abdullah bin Abdul Kadir 1796-1854) also known as Munshi Abdullah. He was a Melaka-born translator and teacher who worked for the British, notably with Stamford Raffles at the time of the British takeover of Singapore. Abdullah was not a traitor to the Malays but one so appalled by the condition of the Malay states that he saw cooperation with the British as a way of improving the lot of the Malays through economic progress, the end of internecine conflict and the spread of education and knowledge.

An 1838 work following a visit to Kelantan, Kisah Pelayaran Abdullah ke Kelantan, had polite advice for Malay rulers. But his better known autobiographical work Hikayat Abdullah written in the 1840s was more scathing in its views of the monarchs.

“It is no light tyranny that has been exercised by the Malay rulers, apart from a few who were good. Women and children who caught their fancy have been abducted by force as though they were taking chickens, with no sort of fear of Allah and regard for his creatures. They have often murdered men whose offences in no way merited death. They have plundered the property of other men, killing the owners or dragging them off into captivity. If they owe money they refuse to pay it. They are very fond of gambling, cock-fighting, opium-eating and keeping a host of slaves. …There are many other disgraceful practices which I feel too ashamed to mention in this book. They keep young girls, sometimes more than a hundred, as concubines in the palace. They have relations with a girl once or twice then for the rest of her life she cannot marry another man…

“Was there not a time when half the world was under Malay dominion and rule? There are many books and records which tell of the rulers of olden times, how great and powerful they were, so rich and full of wisdom. Why have their lands been despoiled by Allah ere now and passed into foreign bondage.

…Even in my own time there have been several Malay principalities which have come to ruin. Some have reverted to jungle where the elephant and tiger roam, because of the cruel injustices of their rulers and chiefs; not merely distant places but, for example, Selangor, Perak, Kedah as well as Padang, Muar, Batu Pahat and Kesang and many others like them. Once they were rich and flourishing states with a large population. Now they are states only in name. …

“Many are the places and lands which have been destroyed by the depredations of the young scions of the ruling house whose rapacious hands can no longer be tolerated by the people. Other races, the English, the Indians, the Arabs, the Chinese do not conduct themselves in the manner I have described. Only the Malays. Among all the other races the ruler’s children are expected to be well educated and very intelligent… If the Malay ruler do not keep their own children under control, how can they themselves exercise authority over the people? As it is under Malay rule ordinary people cannot lift up their heads and enjoy themselves… Another failing commonly found among Malays is their inability to change or modernise their idea or to produce anything new. They utterly refuse to abandon superstitions of the past…”

And so on. Abdullah used many more pages to denounce the rulers and attitudes of the Malay rulers and state of society of his time.

There seems a continuous theme from the 1820s until today. It might be argued that both Abdullah and Alatas were not really Malays. Abdullah was of Tamil Muslim origin, Alatas of Yemeni ancestry and born in Bogor. But the notion of a pure Malay race is a fiction to which the ancestries of Prime Ministers Tunku Abdul Rahman, Hussein Onn and Mahathir Mohamed attest. No one doubted the mastery of Malay language and culture possessed by Abdullah and Alatas, nor their standing as modernist Muslims with enquiring minds. Are there any such figures in Malaysia today?

(Translation of Hikayat Abdullah by A.H. Hill. Concept of a Hero in Malay Society by Shaharuddin b. Maaruf, Eastern Universities Press, 1984)

 

Lest We forget–1MDB Scandal


October 7, 2016

Lest we forget–1MDB Scandal

by Din Merican

I do not envy our diplomats overseas for having to defend Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak who siphoned off millions of Malaysian ringgits of public funds for his own use. There is enough evidence to prosecute him. Yet our Attorney-General had decreed that the openly corrupt Prime Minister has no case to answer.

Something is horribly decadent in the state of Malaysia. Our system of governance sucks while politics stinks so much that even all the perfumes of Arabia cannot eliminate the stench (with apologies to Bill Shakespeare of Elizabethan England) .

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BTW, this quote from Lady Macbeth is dedicated to Prime Minister Najib Razak and Malaysia’s First Lady, Rosmah Mansor:

Lady Macbeth in this quote:

“Here’s the smell of blood still.  All perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.” (V.i.48-50)

furthers the THEME of guilt and unchecked ambition as she sinks deeper into paranoid delusions, sleepwalking and almost talking in riddles. Having told Macbeth “a little water clears us of this deed”(II.ii.67), it is clear that, despite her attempts “Out damned spot!”(V.i.33) she cannot “wash” away her guilt. Lady Macbeth thought she had prepared herself sufficiently by “unsexing” herself but, even she, had no idea that Macbeth would go to such lengths to satisfy his ambition.

Lady Macbeth knows that she is partially responsible for Macbeth’s actions  and “the smell of blood” still lingers as she is as guilty as he is. Lady Macbeth, for all her madness, does recognize that she cannot fix this as “All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.”

Hence the theme of guilt intensifies and Lady Macbeth “needs more the divine than the physician.”(72)

Parliamentary Panel Whitewashes Najib


April 8, 2016

Parliamentary Panel Whitewashes Najib

by John Berthelsen

http://www.asiasentinel.com/politics/malaysia-parliamentary-panel-condemns-1mdb-management/

But steers away from much more serious questions

In sum, while the report on the surface paints a picture of an incompetent management that made a long series of mistakes that ran the fund into the ground, that all has been reported for more than a year by international media and a handful of independent websites – one of which, Malaysia Insider, was blocked and eventually forced to close – it is yet another investigation that does little more than hang a fig leaf on the Prime Minister.–John Berthelsen

The Malaysian Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC), in a 106-page report today (April 7), found what it said were “significant restrictions and weaknesses” in the scandal-ridden 1Malaysia Development Bhd. Fund, recommending that the government open an investigation into the activities of the Fund’s former CEO, Shahrol Azral Ibahim Halmi.

Shahrol Azral Ibahim Halmi (left) and PAC Chairperson

That looks like it will make Shahrol (above) the scapegoat in a probe that arguably involves many other people up to Prime Minister Najib Razak. While finding plenty of fault, the report itself shied away from much more serious charges of misappropriation of up to US$4 billion and spectacular allegations of money-laundering that are pending in five countries and involve allegations of wrongdoing on the part of JhoTaek Low, the youthful wunderkind who persuaded Najib to take over a Terengganu state investment fund in 2009 and turn it into 1MDB, which is backed by the Malaysian Ministry of Finance.

JhoTaek Low (extreme left) in the company of his Patrons (Najib and Rosmah)

Instead, the committee declared a statement by former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad that RM42 billion was missing from the fund to be false, allowing Najib the chance to issue a rejoinder accusing Mahathir of being “motivated by personal interest, not national interest, and a desire to unseat the government.”

 A much stronger report, said to have been produced by the country’s Auditor -General,remains under wraps and subject to Malaysia’s Official Secrets Act, making anyone who reports on its contents liable for prosecution. The Auditor General’s report is said to not only recommend the Board of Directors for prosecution but names Najib himself.

Although Inspector-General of Police Khalid Abu Bakar said the Police would “conduct a detailed and in-depth examination of the Auditor’s report to check if there are any elements warranting investigation and further action,” so far police investigations into matters surrounding 1MDB appear to have been curtailed by political interference.

In particular, a report by the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (now discredited corruption busting agency), said to be ready to recommend prosecution of the prime minister himself for diverting state funds into his own pockets, was derailed and the Attorney_General, Abdul Gani Patail, was retired “for health reasons.” One of the lead prosecutors for the MACC, Kevin Morais, was kidnapped and later found in an oil drum full of cement that had been rolled into a river. His burned car was found in another state.

 A statement from the troubled fund itself said the report “dispelled numerous allegations” about it, saying the board “has successfully steered 1MDB through a uniquely challenging period and trusts that, with the release of the PAC Report, a line has been drawn.”

There were concerns in early 2015 that the government-backed Fund might default, threatening the country’s entire financial system. In May of last year, the Fund began selling off assets, including US$2.3 billion to the subsidiary of a Chinese state-owned enterprise, raising concerns on the part of critics over Chinese government ownership of Malaysian power assets.

While the report seemingly delivers a harsh verdict on 1MDB’s conduct of business, in fact it mostly confirms stories that have been in the press for months. Many were carried by The Edge Media Group owned by Tan Kooi Ong and publisher Ho Kay Tat. After detailed stories appeared on misdoings in the fund, the substance of many of them repeated in the committee’s report the government suspended the publication and its sister publications for three months. A court reversed the order after two months, but The Edge has never really recovered its previous financial and journalistic standing. The government has also blocked more than 30 websites, many of which have reported critically on the scandal, including Sarawak Report and Asia Sentinel.

As widely reported by a variety of publications, particularly Sarawak Report, 1MDB’s troubles began when it formed a joint venture with a mysterious Middle Eastern oil exploration firm called PetroSaudi that seemed to have been brought into existence for the purpose of the joint venture. The management did so without telling the board of directors. As much as US$1 billion disappeared from PetroSaudi, with a significant portion of it believed to have been routed into entities backed by Jho Taek Low, a pudgy Penang-born financier who subsequently exploded into New York’s café society, buying magnums of champagne for a coterie of blondes.

 The Flamboyant Jho Taek Low

“The 1MDB Board of Directors was not briefed clearly regarding the project partner and its relation between three companies – PetroSaudi International Ltd (Saudi), PetroSaudi Holdings (Cayman) Ltd and PetroSaudi International (Cayman),” it said. “The Board of Directors gave conditional approval to the management of 1MDB to carry out the effort with PetroSaudi International Ltd, but the actual deal was signed with PetroSaudi Holdings (Cayman) Ltd without the informing the 1MDB Board regarding the change of the project partner,” it said.

 1MDB PetroSaudi Ltd, which was later made into a joint venture company, was registered much earlier by PetroSaudi Holdings (Cayman) Ltd on September 18, 2009, eight days before the approval of the Board of Directors on September 26.

 The Board was also not informed that 1MDB PetroSaudi Ltd had been established on the day that the first proposal was brought to the board. “This shows that the management of 1MDB had decided to work with PetroSaudi International Ltd earlier without informing the board of directors,” the report said.

It said that the Board was also not informed that there was a clause in the joint venture agreement stating that 1MDB PetroSaudi Ltd had to pay a US$700 million (RM2.73 billion)

A loan from its parent company PetroSaudi Holdings (Cayman) Ltd on or before September 30, two days before the agreement was signed. Approval was also not given by the Board to pay the US$700 million loan from the US$1billion in investments that had been channeled into accounts owned by other companies, presumably those controlled by Jho Low, as he is universally known.

In sum, while the report on the surface paints a picture of an incompetent management that made a long series of mistakes that ran the fund into the ground, that all has been reported for more than a year by international media and a handful of independent websites – one of which, Malaysia Insider, was blocked and eventually forced to close – it is yet another investigation that does little more than hang a fig leaf on the Prime Minister.

Imam Apandi Ali says Najib is OK, we Malaysians are not


February 29, 2016

A Parody: Imam Apandi Ali says Najib is OK, we Malaysians are not

by Iskandar Dzulkarnain

http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

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Not only is he (Najib) a democrat, he is also a pious religious leader who upholds Islam and will not hesitate to invite a respected religious party like PAS to form a unity government with UMNO.–Iskandar Dzulkarnain

Attorney-General Apandi Ali recently cleared Prime Minister Najib Razak of all charges relating to the RM2.6 billion donation and the RM42 million from SRC International that he received in his private bank accounts in 2013.

Instead of rejoicing at Najib’s good fortune as we get back to the daily grind, Malaysians are still speculating like stock market remisiers about his innocence. So what more do Malaysians want?

Why isn’t anyone apologising to Najib on social media or congratulating him for his innocence and honesty? Why is the Opposition still hell bent on implicating him and 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) on the misappropriation of funds?

Way before these developments, Najib hinted of an Anti-Najib Campaign and an international conspiracy to unseat him, and now it is horribly clear countries from the four corners of the world have reared their ugly heads to do precisely as he indicated.

Hong Kong… USA… Singapore… France and Switzerland are all jointly investigating 1MDB for purported fraud and money laundering to the tune of USD4 billion although the Swiss have quietly hinted that Najib is not being investigated.

Everyone knows that America is an enemy, while Switzerland should investigate their own corrupt citizens like Xavier Andre Justo, instead of meddling in other country’s affairs. Hong Kong is China’s stooge while Singapore should be thankful to Malaysia for its very existence and France would do anything to sell their military arms like submarines and nuclear power plants.

Less than three days after AG Apandi cleared Najib of all possible criminal charges, these evil governments started to accuse 1MDB of the misappropriation of funds without any concrete proof. Even France has revived investigations into the Scorpene submarine commissions deal and Mongolian Altantuya Shaariibu.

Malaysians should learn to call it a day. Now that Najib has been triumphantly vindicated, we should be thankful for having such an innocent and honest prime minister who will lead the country to greater heights if we just allow him ample room to do his job.

Even an Arabian Prince who was mistaken for the late Arab King trusted Najib so profoundly, that he willingly donated RM2.6 billion to our Prime Minister’s personal accounts. But instead of blowing the whole sum on the 13th General Election and to combat the waning Muslim Brotherhood threat, our prudent Najib only used up a measly RM62 million of it.

An instead of pocketing the rest like other ruthless and greedy politicians would have done, our prime minister promptly returned the balance or 91 per cent back to the King with an open heart. Such tall tales of chivalry are what fairy tales like the Arabian Nights are made of.

Barisan Nasional leaders can vouch for a fact that Najib is a righteous man who is incapable of corruption, money laundering, swindling or any other hurtful accusations levelled at him by the Opposition.

This is why so many BN leaders are willing to pawn their reputations to protect his impeccable character and sacrifice their careers to ensure no harm befalls dear Najib. This is what true sycophantic friendship is all about.

Everyone including Royalty knows that Najib deserves another chance. AG Apandi should be highly commended for his virtuous actions and for not buckling under the tremendous pressure brought on by the onslaught of negative public opinion.

Meanwhile, a courageous Najib can only smile at all the unthinkable accusations being levelled at him, knowing full well that in the end, the truth will set him free.

Najib has always come across as a moderate world class leader compared to the likes of Robert Mugabe or General Idi Amin. His suave, dashing good looks and charming demeanour immediately impresses anyone he comes in contact with.

For the past six years Najib has done so much to unite the nation with his 1Malaysia slogan, 1MDB and BR1M, and we should be thankful for his contributions.

With the untamed energy of a Bugis warrior, Najib is ready to take the country to the 21st century. He single-handedly abolished the ISA, replacing it with more effective laws like Sosma, Pota and the NSC Bill. He also saved the nation’s economy by implementing the highly popular GST.

With Malaysians getting more and more racist by the day, such laws are heaven-sent to divide and rule the nation, and to save Malaysians from themselves.

Not only is he a democrat, he is also a pious religious leader who upholds Islam and will not hesitate to invite a respected religious party like PAS to form a unity government with Umno.

Therefore, Malaysians should stop believing in the Opposition lies that one man could single-handedly bring an entire nation’s economy to its knees but heed instead the advice of our ministers on getting a second (or third) job instead to ride out the economic downturn.

Be thankful that the GST has saved the nation from getting stuck in an economic rut so that we can look forward to the next BR1M handout.

Lastly, let’s give Najib a big hand for being found innocent, leading Malaysia into first world nation status and restoring democracy and the rule of law to this beloved land of ours.

Tour consultant, sports pilot and naturalist Iskandar Dzulkarnain has been writing for a few years now, especially satirical articles like this. He is an FMT columnist.

Opinion: Malaysians caught between Fact and Fiction


July 24, 2016

Opinion: Malaysians caught between Fact and Fiction

by John Berthelsen

http://www.asiasentinel.com/opinion/opinion-lies-malaysia-attorney-general/

A corrupt government seeks to cover up murder

 

john-berthelsen

So in the long run, who do you believe about the deaths of Kevin Morais and Hussain Najadi and Altantuya Shaariibuu, and the subsequent statements by Mohamad Apandi Ali over the MACC probe?  The Malaysian government? Or Sarawak Report and Asia Sentinel, both of which are now banned in Malaysia? Neither publication is likely to stop investigating them.–John Berthelsen

When a Malaysian Deputy Prosecutor named Kevin Morais disappeared on September. 4 last year after leaving his condominium in Kuala Lumpur on his way to work, the rumor spread that the 55-year-old Morais, who was gay, probably had tired of his job with the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission and had left with his lover, probably for London. And, newly-minted Attorney General Mohamed Apandi Ali said, Morais had nothing to do with the controversial MACC probe into Prime Minister Najib Razak’s tangled financial affairs.

It is widely believed that that probe got former Attorney General Abdul Gani Patail fired from his job in July, to be replaced by Apandi Ali, an UMNO stooge and loyalist who served in a variety of different capacities, including as the judge who ruled that Christians couldn’t use the word “Allah” to describe god.

What nobody expected was that Morais would turn up. The rumor about his disappearance was put to the lie when a CCTV camera, by chance, caught Morais’s car being rammed on a Kuala Lumpur street and him being dragged from it. Morais was later found in an oil drum filled with cement in a river in Subang Jaya, a Kuala Lumpur suburb. His burned car was found in a palm oil plantation in Perak. The Police said it was an open and shut case. Morais had been killed by confederates of an army doctor in revenge for prosecuting a case against him.

That has been put to the lie as well. Morais’s brother in Atlanta, Georgia in the US turned up in Kuala Lumpur to issue a statement saying Morais was not only working on the Najib case, but he was either leading or co-leading the prosecution, and that he had sent him a USB drive containing information on the case. That has been corroborated by other sources in Kuala Lumpur.

It has since become clear that Morais in addition was one of the sources of deeply detailed information on Najib’s finances that was being fed to Clare Rewcastle Brown, the editor and writer of Sarawak Report. So rather than being killed for revenge by an angry army doctor, it appears that he was killed for being a whistleblower.

So why was Apandi Ali, the country’s chief law enforcement officer, lying about Kevin Morais’s activities? Why was the lie spread that he had left town with a homosexual lover? Why did the Attorney General’s office say Morais had nothing to do with the Najib case?

Apandi Ali has now denounced a story by Sarawak Report – and a similar Asia Sentinel story quoting Sarawak Report –that the MACC had forwarded 37 criminal charges against Najib for prosecution. He has said he sent the case back to the MACC for further work. Is Apandi also lying about that as well?  Given the clear lies about Morais, who does the reader want to believe? Mohamad Apandi Ali or Asia Sentinel and Sarawak Report

Apandi Ali says he has sent the report back to the MACC for revision. He retires officially in three weeks, meaning he wants to pass the hot potato to his successor, expected to be another UMNO lawyer, Mohamad Shafie Abdullah.

The story has earned a ban for Asia Sentinel in Malaysia from the communications ministry, which has issued a notice saying “This website is not available in Malaysia because it violates the national laws.” The ban has holes in it, but, say sources in Kuala Lumpur, it is likely to tighten.

It seems more likely that it is the Malaysian government that violates the national laws, not only in the case involving Kevin Morais but in a long list of other cases. For a second one, try the murder of Hussain Najadi, the retired founder of AMBank Malaysia, who was gunned down in a parking lot in 2013. Although law enforcement officials said he was shot in a dispute over a Hindu temple property matter, Hussain’s son Pascal has charged that his father was assassinated because he said he wouldn’t play along with financial irregularities involving the United Malay National Organization prior to his death, refusing to orchestrate a multi-billion ringgit property deal connected to the Kuala Lumpur City Center. On one occasion, he told his son that Prime Minister Najib Razak was “lining his pockets with billions of ringgit with no consideration for the future of the country.”

A gunman was almost immediately arrested. The property dispute story was widely accepted by everybody but Pascal Najadi. The supposed mastermind, one Lim Yuen Soo, went on the run for two years. But Lim, a Melaka gangster and nightclub owner, appeared to be hiding in plain sight. In fact, he was part owner of the Active Force Security Services Sdn Bhd. with the former Malacca Police Chief Mohd Khasni Mohd Nor.

When the Police caught up with Lim at Kuala Lumpur International Airport, arresting him on an Interpol warrant, they held him incognito for eight days before they turned him loose for “lack of evidence.” But that story raised more questions than it answered. If he could be turned loose for lack of evidence, why wasn’t the original case reopened to find out who had actually paid the gunman to kill Hussain?

As to the probe of Najib’s finances, it is clear from what has emerged in Sarawak Report that he may be a cheap crook as well as a thief of titanic proportions, given the huge amounts of money that apparently have been siphoned from 1Malaysia Development Bhd., the troubled state-backed investment fund.  The MACC, in its probe, found him to be using credit cards from SRC International, a Middle Eastern company supposedly involved in oil exploration that was funded by 1MDB. Najib ran up bills of RM449,000 on an SRC Visa card and another RM2.8 million on an SRC MasterCard in August 2014. That in effect was public money, spent on hotels, meals, jewelry, and other personal items in Italy and Monaco. 

He is already believed to have taken millions in kickbacks on defense contracts and purchases during his years as defense minister, particularly on the purchase of two French submarines as well as purchase of Sukhoi jet fighters at vastly inflated costs and other contracts. Yet, despite the tens of millions stolen, he still had to use credit cards from a publicly owned company to fund his wife’s vast needs for jewelry and handbags.

It was Najib’s years as Defense Minister that ended up in the 2006 death of the Mongolian translator and party girl, Altantuya Shaariibuu, at the hands of two of Najib’s bodyguards. It has long been assumed that Altantuya was attempting to blackmail Najib’s close friend, Abdul Razak Baginda, over what she knew about the purchase of those submarines.

So in the long run, who do you believe about the deaths of Kevin Morais and Hussain Najadi and Altantuya Shaariibuu, and the subsequent statements by Mohamad Apandi Ali over the MACC probe?  The Malaysian government? Or Sarawak Report and Asia Sentinel, both of which are now banned in Malaysia? Neither publication is likely to stop investigating them.