Cambodian Minister: Incident should serve as lesson for everyone


February 17, 2019

Cambodian minister: Incident should serve as lesson for everyone

Bernama  |  Published:

The incident involving 47 Malaysians detained at the Banteay Mancheay prison in Cambodia should serve as a lesson for everyone, said Special Duties Minister in the Cambodian Prime Minister’s Department Othsman Hassan.

He said such a mistake should not be repeated in the future as the lucrative salary offered was too good to be true.

“If it is true that such lucrative salary to be paid, certainly the Cambodians will be employed first,” he said this during the symbolic handover of 47 detainees from the Cambodian government to the Malaysia and Sarawak governments in Siem Reap today.

Othsman represented the Cambodian government while Malaysia and Sarawak were represented by Sarawak Welfare, Community Wellbeing, Women, Family and Childhood Development Minister Fatimah Abdullah.

Also present were Santubong MP Seri Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar, Temporary Charge de Affairs at the Malaysian Embassy in Phnom Penh Ruzaimi Mohamad and director of the Sarawak regional office of the Foreign Ministry Deddy Faisal Ahmad Salleh.

Meanwhile, Fatimah expressed her gratitude to the Cambodian government for providing good cooperation to the Malaysian government during the negotiating process to bring home all the detainees.

“With the power of Almighty Allah we have met with people such as Datuk Othsman and his friends who are sincere in helping us to secure the release of the detainees, as well as the Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail, Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg, Foreign Minister Datuk Saifuddin Abdullah and Foreign Ministry secretary-general,” she said.

Fatimah said the Malaysian government was in the midst of arranging the transportation to bring all 47 Malaysians home.

“Initially, we are planning to bring them home in stages, but it is better if all can return home in one group,” she said.

 

Orang Asli Development: A New Starting Point Needed


January 17, 2019

 

Orang Asli Development: A New Starting Point Needed. It is time to stop playing  politics with their future.

By Dr. Lim Teck Ghee

Image result for orang asli malaysia The neglected and humiliated original Malaysians. Time to stop playing  politics with their future.

In the last few weeks there has been an unusual flurry of press statements drawing attention to the Orang Asli community. They include the announcement of a national conference to be held on January 11 to discuss proactive proposals to resolve the issues faced by the 200,000 Orang Asli in our country.

The conference – which seems to have been aborted – was to have been preceded by a roundtable discussion on January 6 to identify the primary issues faced by the community, including rights to land, infrastructure access, education, the digital gap and youth empowerment.

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Simultaneously, the Deputy Prime Minister, Dr. Wan Azizah Wan Ismail during a visit to Cameron Highlands declared that the Government was studying the need to create a comprehensive development plan in line with that of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention 107 on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples which encourages governments to involve Indigenous People in development projects and provides guidance on the protection of tribal people.

Observers may be forgiven if they have linked these announcements to the coming Cameron Highlands by election. Orang Asli votes comprise over 20% of the estimated 32,000 voters for this parliamentary constituency and are perceived to be a key swing factor in the much watched election taking place on 26 January.

Another Ditched Pakatan Harapan Promise?

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For GOD’s sake, Wan Azizah– Get your priorities right

But perhaps the Orang Asli voters and the larger community in the country may want to give the benefit of the doubt to the new government in view of the promises contained in the Pakatan manifesto on the preservation of Orang Asli customary land rights and concern for their welfare and development.

Will this be one key election promise made by Pakatan that can be realized without too much delay and controversy?

After all, examination of the economic and socio-cultural indicators available including infant and child mortality, life expectancy, educational levels, income levels, etc. – and there can no dispute over them in respect to those of this minority community – point to the shameful reality that 60 years after independence, the Orang Asli community – indisputably the first peoples in the Malay Peninsula – remain the poorest, the most marginalized, and the most dispossessed of home, land, means of subsistence, history, language, culture and identity.

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To expedite the process of reintegration of Orang Asli into the mainstream of society, it is imperative that the old template for resolution of the community’s problems be discarded and a new starting point of reference is established to restore the rights and status of our first peoples.

New Starting Point to Correct Past and Present Wrongs

Here are 3 suggestions for the Pakatan government (and for whoever wins the Cameron by election) to consider:

  1. Ratify ILO convention 169 on indigenous and tribal peoples in place of ILO convention 106 which was introduced more than 60 years ago.  The newer convention 169 which came into force in 1991 but which Malaysia has yet to sign on has been found necessary in view of the worsening developments in the situation of indigenous and tribal peoples in all regions of the world. This has made it appropriate for countries to adopt new international standards and to remove the assimilationist orientation of the earlier convention.

                                   ILO Convention 169

Convention No. 169 represents a consensus on the rights of indigenous and tribal peoples within the nation-States where they live and the responsibilities of governments to protect these rights. It is based on respect for the cultures and ways of life of indigenous peoples and recognizes their right to land and natural resources and to define their own priorities for development. The Convention aims at overcoming discriminatory practices affecting these peoples and enabling them to participate in decision-making that affects their lives

2   Resolve the land problems of the Orang Asli communities by recognising their ownership right to customary and ancestral lands and providing them with permanent titles. This can begin with analysis of land office, survey, mapping, forestry and other archival records of British colonial rule as well as the records of the post-colonial government which can establish the boundaries of areas where the Orang Asli have had their traditional settlements and hunting-gathering territories; and which,during the colonial period, were demarcated and regarded as Orang Asli territories.

3.  Honour the Orang Asli by recognizing their rightful place in this country through a national apology or a similar declaration from the highest level of government expressing regret for the historical injustices done to the community; pledging and honoring to right past wrongs committed during the colonial and post-colonial era; and promising action to build a sustainable and meaningful future for the community.

To date national political apologies or official expressions of remorse have taken place in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, United States of America, Norway and Sweden.  Similar expressions have also been recently made by political leaders in some Latin American countries with indigenous communities.

A declaration to this effect would be a significant first for Malaysia in the ASEAN Community while we would be the second nation after Taiwan in Asia to provide such a political initiative.

This move has been seen by scholars researching the topic of apologies to indigenous peoples in comparative perspective as having the merit of putting things on record and as a prelude to reconciliation and correction of ethical flaws in the state political culture.

More importantly to me, an official expression would demonstrate the nation’s commitment to respecting human rights, and upholding justice, equality and non-discrimination.

 

Message to Harapan Government– NIP Wahhabism in the Bud


November 18, 2018

Message to Harapan Government— NIP Wahhabism the Bud

By Fathol Zaman Bukhari

https://www.ipohecho.com.my/v4/article/2018/11/16/spread-of-wahhabism

Professor Ahmad Fauzi Abdul Hamid of Universiti Sains Malaysia’s damning statement that Muslims in Malaysia are “slowly but surely becoming radicalised” should not be taken lightly. I knew this was coming as ominous signs are so plentiful and obvious that even the most cynical can no longer dismiss them as inconsequential.

The Islamic scholar implored that the new Pakatan Harapan Government take precautionary measures to arrest the spread before things get out of hand.

“Before the situation becomes untenable like what is happening in Afghanistan and Pakistan, it’s better to nip the problem in the bud. We need to do whatever possible to see it done. Revamping the school curriculum is one possible way to correct the situation,” he said.

Islam preaches compassion, love and tolerance but what we see in the Middle East, Pakistan and Afghanistan is something else. All of those benign virtues associated with Islam are being systematically destroyed by people who use religion for their very own selfish ends. I concur with the academician that religious extremism has no place in a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural Malaysia.

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The radicalisation of Islam in Malaysia, incidentally, did not happen in a few short years. It is like an underground fire that is fueled by methane gas. You don’t see the flame but the burning continues and the heat permeates through the vents. It becomes volatile and deadly once the flames reach the surface and start to engulf the surrounding. This is the scenario I can think of.

According to Fauzi, Islamic theology taught in government schools in the early 1990s has shifted from traditional to one derived from the Middle East, especially from Saudi Arabia. The views are one-sided, sidestepping the norms while embracing a more radical form of mind-set, one of exclusivity, supremacist, with diminishing respect for the practitioners of other religions. Thus minorities and those with differing views are considered “aliens” or “non-conformists.”

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The term “liberalism” is often bandied about. If being a Muslim and you don’t conform you are a “liberal” and is regarded an outcast destined to burn in hell. The naivety is simply mind-blowing. The only similarity I can allude to is the Inquisition in 12th century France which later spread to Spain and Portugal. The objective of the Inquisitors was to “combat dissent and public heresy committed by baptised Christians.” And the targeted groups were mainly converts who were erroneously labelled as suspects due to the “assumption that they had secretly reverted to their former religions.

Incidentally, the last public execution of the Inquisition was in Spain in 1826 when a school teacher was garrotted (strangled) for being a disbeliever and attempting to spread his belief to his students.

Things were definitely different, pre- and post Merdeka in 1957. And being someone from that era I can safely vouch for it. In 1979, following the Iranian Revolution that helped catapult Ayatollah Khomeini into power, the equation changed dramatically. The revolution sparked interest in Islam all over the world.

Iran is a proponent of the Shia form of Islam which is strongly opposed by the Sunnis in other parts of the Muslim world led by Saudi Arabia. The oil-rich Saudi government, in wanting to counter the spread of Shia teachings, took advantage of this change offering scholarships and money to institutions and charities in the developing Muslim world. Malaysia was one of the many beneficiaries.

 

This, the Saudis believe, would help impose their brand of conservative Islam popularly referred to as Wahhabism or Salafism within their area of influence, including Malaysia.

In the 1980s and 1990s many Malaysians, especially Malay Muslims, went overseas for higher education. Due to the interest in Islam, many headed to the Middle East especially Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt to pursue religious studies. This was made possible by the generous scholarships offered by the Saudi Arabian government. Over there they were exposed to the Wahhabi/Salafist way of thinking and practices.

When these students returned they got into the mainstream education system and becoming the ideal source for the Wahhabi/Salafist way of thinking which preaches intolerance, extremism and exclusivity. Some gained entry into the civil service, becoming influential bureaucrats, lawyers, academicians and politicians. These people are now in positions of power thus allowing them to make decisions for the good and bad of all of us. That explains why the thinking of these “misfits” are so skewed

Wahhabism was started by Muhammad Abd al-Wahhab (1703-1792) who was dismayed by what he saw in Istanbul. The Ottoman Turks’ way of life, he reasoned, was revolting. He then decided to propagate his version of “a pure and unadulterated Islam.”

The “Arabisation” of Malay Muslims has accelerated over the years. Today “uncovered” women are a rarity. And if you do meet them they are among the few who dare to be different. To the diehard believers, this phenomenon is the result of the proliferation liberalism that corrodes their way of life. The traditional yet alluring kebaya modern, the choice dress of my mother and aunties in the 1950s right to 1970s, had given way to the drab and soulless “tudung” and “telekung” which are designed to conceal the female figure.

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Why no skull cap for Anwar Ibrahim?

Male members are more adept at sporting a goatee and wearing a skullcap, as this is deemed appropriate and in sync with the dress code of Wahhabis. The more Arab one looks and talks, help to improve one’s religious credentials. It is about being as close as what was witnessed in 6th century Mecca and Madinah.
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So “selamat pagi” becomes “assalamualaikum” and “akhirat” becomes “jannah”. It is definitely chic to lace one’s speech with some Arab-sounding words although they may mean little or nothing to both speakers and listeners. The absurdity is getting a little out of hand, I dare say. But to the adherents this is God-sent.

The troubled interfaith relations prevalent today are the result of this exclusivist Wahhabi/Salafist thinking which has crept into the education curriculum and mind-set. Renowned Muslim scholars are labelled “secular” and “liberal” to keep the Muslim masses from hearing them out. Those who do not toe the line are banned from speaking out. Fatwas (religious edicts) issued are seldom explained. Questioning a fatwa is considered blasphemous.

Notwithstanding the brouhaha surrounding the controversial Department of Islamic Development (JAKIM), no solutions are yet forthcoming. Funding for the department’s many questionable activities has never been accounted for.

Where will all this lead us to? Your guess is as good as mine. With the emergence of Malaysia Baru (New Malaysia) this inadequacy will be addressed in due course. But looking at what’s been happening, I have my doubts.

Hopefully, I will be proven wrong.

Why I am very disillusioned with PKR


November 7, 2018

Why I am very disillusioned with PKR

 

 

Opinion

by Francis Paul Siah@www.malaysiakini.com

–“The majority of Malaysians are not interested in your internal party problems. They are fed up”.–Francis Paul Siah

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COMMENT | I didn’t mince my words when I sent this message to a very dear friend who is a key leader in Sarawak PKR the day he and his party comrades lodged a report at the Kuching MACC over alleged ambiguities in the Julau PKR division. “Do you know that all of you look like clowns in the media requesting the MACC to go after one of your own MPs?

“What nonsense is this? You cannot even resolve a simple problem within a small division in your party and you expect us to believe that you can run the country!

“Again, I say ‘paloi’ to all those fighting one another in PKR. Sorry, my friend. The majority of Malaysians are not interested in your internal party problems. They are fed up”.

My friend attempted this feeble response: “So what do you expect us clowns to do? Keep quiet and let them destroy our party? It’s quite obvious that party members often do not see what is wrong within their own organisation and it takes an outsider to awaken them with the truth.

So let the truth be told.

Replying to my friend, I said that no one is destroying PKR from outside. It is PKR leaders themselves, due to their greed and lust for power, who are destroying the party. When they have power, they cannot handle it.

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I’ve just viewed the video of the fracas in Keningau in which PKR Deputy presidential candidate Rafizi Ramli was allegedly assaulted. It should have been a typical BN vs Pakatan Harapan scene during an election. Now, it’s a PKR vs PKR brawl. How sickening is that?

Many of us are probably aware that a top PKR leader is a notable schemer. He has been scheming throughout his long political career. At times, one wonders whether his political enemies only exist in his imagination. Such a leader who frequently indulges in shadow boxing is unfit to lead any organisation, let alone the nation.

Whether my friends in Sarawak PKR trust my words or not, this was my sincere message to them:  “You guys in Sarawak PKR deserve better. I do not see any problem in Sarawak PKR. You are all decent and responsible folks. Why get entangled in nonsense imported from Malaya?”

“And why do you need the whole Sarawak PKR committee to be present to lodge a report against a member who only joined the party five months ago? You are all giving (PKR Julau MP) Larry Sng too much ‘face’ when he doesn’t deserve it? Wrong move!”

“The problem with PKR leaders now is that when there is no enemy to fight, they fight among themselves. No different from those UMNO parasites whom Malaysians had just said good riddance to. Very disappointing and sad indeed!”

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I ended with this poser to my friend: “So what if (deputy president) Azmin (Ali) wins? So what if Rafizi wins? What do Sarawak or Sarawakians benefit? Only some of you in the party will probably gain from the spoils of war if your ‘ayam sabong‘ (fighting cock) is victorious. Is this what the PKR election is all about – just for the benefit of a few in the party?”

Internal strife, bigger problems

What is happening in PKR today has greatly disappointed Malaysians. PKR emerged as the biggest party in the Harapan coalition after GE-14 because of the support of Malaysians who wanted change. All the Harapan candidates who contested under the PKR symbol (except in Sarawak and Sabah) had greatly helped the party gained prominence too. PKR leaders should do well to bear that in mind.

A few months later, PKR turned out to be one big mess, a party which has lost the respect of many, mine certainly. The ongoing party polls are getting messier and dirtier with the police and MACC now involved. This makes the UMNO elections, with the alleged involvement of money politics, pale into a fight among kindergarten kids.

No one, perhaps not even the PKR leadership, expected the party elections to turn out this way – one gigantic mess which could split the party right down the middle.

And we were told earlier that a party election is normal and part of the democratic process and that this would be a friendly contest within the family. Haven’t we heard enough of such crap from politicians?

I’ have posed this before in a previous article, so let me repeat it to the warring factions in PKR: Are you all happy to see either Azmin or Rafizi destroyed politically or would you be happier to see them working together and contributing positively for the betterment of the nation and people? At this stage of the game, I predict a victory for Azmin. I also foresee more internal strife and bigger problems for PKR in the weeks and months down the road.

And one more thing – I also think it’s okay for Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad to renege on his promises by saying, “Oh, when I said it, I didn’t know we were going to win the elections”. So PKR, don’t say you have not been warned. The people are watching.


FRANCIS PAUL SIAH heads the Movement for Change, Sarawak (MoCS) and can be reached at sirsiah@gmail.com

The views expressed here are those of the author/contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of Malaysiakini.

Anwar, Dr. Mahathir and Port Dickson


October 2, 2018

Anwar, Dr. Mahathir and Port Dickson

by Zaid Ibrahim

http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com

Image result for Anwar and Mahathir

Having spent two full days in Port Dickson, I feel compelled to urge all Malaysians, not just the Port Dickson voters, to come forward with more energy and enthusiasm in support of Anwar Ibrahim. Let’s create the buzz and excitement which is now sadly lacking in support of PKR, the party that allowed its symbol to be used for the epic victory on May 9.

Let’s not treat Anwar as an opposition figure like we did over the last 20 years. He is now an integral part of Pakatan Harapan (PH), the party that the people voted in to replace the kleptocrats.

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Many in Port Dickson and elsewhere are still asking inane questions such as why Anwar engineered this by-election, why he is in a hurry. Why can’t Nurul Izzah Anwar vacate her seat for her father, and so on. There are also those who keep asking: Is Anwar suitable to be Prime Minister, what is his vision for the country, etc.

These are legitimate questions but if we are seriously looking for answers, we should have asked them before May 9. We should not have portrayed to the people during the election campaign that Dr Mahathir Mohamad and Anwar are working together for the good of the country. We should not have agreed to the winning formula that Anwar succeed Mahathir as Prime Minister.

Once we agree on a deal, we have to honour it. No more questions asked. There is no need to question the timing of Anwar’s entry into Parliament and which seat he should be contesting. If he is not good enough to be the next prime minister, then why the need to accost him in the corridors of courtrooms to invite him to topple Najib Razak? There must be honour, even in politics.

Why is the subject of a government of national unity being talked about non-stop by UMNO and PAS? It’s because Anwar does not feel wanted in the PH government. UMNO and PAS are therefore trying their luck to lure Anwar away from PH. In light of this, it makes sense for parties in PH to assure PKR that its position in the coalition is safe, and that its leader, Anwar, will succeed Mahathir as Prime Minister on a specified date.

This assurance must not be just verbal. Verbal assurances mean nothing in politics. Instead, it must take the form of action by Mahathir and all the leaders of PPBM, Amanah and DAP.

There are three things they can do very quickly.

The Prime Minister, after a few days’ rest from his successful trip to New York and London, needs to go to Port Dickson. Although the Prime Minister does not usually campaign in a by-election, this is no ordinary election. This one gives the certificate of eligibility to his successor. We must not give the impression that there has been a change of mind about Anwar becoming the next Prime Minister.

The people are tired of political gamesmanship and they just want a smooth transition of power. A few reassuring words from the Prime Minister in Port Dickson that the leadership of PH is solidly behind Anwar will go a long way towards ensuring victory for Anwar and sending the message to Malaysians that their leaders want to focus on the more difficult issue of governance, and nothing else.

Some say that Anwar is an “Islamist” and will abandon democracy and secular principles, while others say he was a right-wing UMNO flag-bearer before his dismissal many years ago. I don’t want to get involved in such arguments. All I know is that Anwar and PH today are much, much better than PAS and UMNO; and I know that unless we drive him out, Anwar would rather stay with other reformists in PH. His own party, PKR, is a party of diverse racial and religious groups which will guide Anwar towards policies that unite the people.

The second thing PH leaders can do very quickly is to give Anwar some latitude in the appointment of key personnel in corporations and government-linked companies. It’s probably too late now, but it needs to be said: this is how real partnerships work. If we do not want key decisions and appointments to be left to powerful oligarchs or a special selected group like the 4th floor boys or the famous “Kitchen Cabinet” under Najib’s rule, then we must also not allow some eminent persons to dictate how the country should be managed. Ministers must take charge and senior party leaders like Anwar consulted. We won the election because the people believed we were going to put an end to kleptocracy, but if “oligarchs” still make key decisions in the new Malaysia, then it’s just a matter of time before we are back to the old ways

The final thing to do is for PH leaders to set a date for Mahathir to step down. This date must be decided collectively. I suggest May 2020, which will give Mahathir enough time to put in place plans for the big picture. If Anwar agrees to this, nothing he says or does will be viewed with suspicion or interpreted as an attempt to accelerate his ascent to the top.

The country needs certainty and stability, and we must give the rakyat a smooth succession plan. The people are tired of the endless power-play, so let’s give politicking a rest. This is the message PH needs to bring to Port Dickson.

Zaid Ibrahim is a former law minister.

The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of FMT.

Not so much ‘New M’sia Government, but one consumed by a shiok sendiri syndrome


Not so much ‘New M’sia Government, but one consumed by a shiok sendiri syndrome and groping in the dark

September 27, 2018 by R. Nadeswaran@www.malaysiakini.com COMMENT

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William Lyons, a senior lecturer at the Glasgow University argues that fear of the dark is usually not a fear of darkness itself, but a fear of possible or imagined dangers concealed by darkness. When fear of the dark reaches a degree that is severe enough, it is considered pathological.

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Pakatan Harapan Defense Minister who became a Fighter Pilot overnight– A Case of Shiok Sendiri

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Imitating an UMNO Fighter Pilot

This is not a class on fear and darkness, but provides a fairly accurate description of how some Pakatan Harapan leaders – including ministers – are performing. After almost five months in government, they are still groping in the dark and this becomes inexcusable.

To put it more succinctly and concisely, they are not stumbling in darkness but tipping over each other in broad daylight. Offering none, or sometimes nonsensical, solutions to the problems facing the citizens, some of their utterances and actions have bordered on incongruity.

This is no report card on the government. We elected our Members of Parliament (MPs) for five years but transversely, the events since May 9 have been emitting a sense of hopelessness among the common folk. Not that the public expects the sky and moon, but would just like to see changes that would offer a better quality of life.

Let’s not beat around the bush – any government or a set of lawmakers will do better than BN– with closed eyes even if one does not try.  BN’s track record over the past six decades was so abysmal, appalling and dreadful, that even minor changes would look astronomical.

The (new) government was elected on the premise (among others) that it would root out corruption, cut out cronyism, promote meritocracy, address weaknesses in the  administration and revamp the government machinery so that the people will be the eventual beneficiaries of such changes. The people were promised improvements and reforms and doing away with nonsensical pieces of legislation.

Little of this has been seen. Take the much-talked about child marriages as an example. Why is there so much  pussyfooting over an issue that can be solved, just by taking away the jurisdiction given to religious courts.

Excuses after excuse have been given including one that there would be legal and social implications if the minimum age of marriage is increased to 18 years.

What legal and social implications, one may ask? For the previous regime, the escape-all clause when everything else failed, was to throw in the religious or the race card. It is ludicrous that a child is allowed to be married based on culture, religion and customs, which are actually excuses to    not accepting international standards in human rights. Ditto for the current set of lawmakers.

Parliament not football pitch

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How and why should an elected MP resign? What is the co-relation between “Langkah Port Dickson” and parliamentary reforms?

The last time we heard of the  phrase, the then speaker Pandikar Amin Mulia got a new toilet and an expensive set of furniture for his office!

Parliamentarians are lawmakers. Parliament is not a football pitch were substitution is allowed anytime without any rhyme or reason – according to the whims and fancies of the coach or manager.

When BN put up posters before nomination day in the last election, they were accused of breaking election laws. Drive around Port Dickson today and you’ll notice giant banners and buntings. What reform, when the law breaker is seeking office?

And why should the Education Minister play a dual role as the president of a university? However one look at it, he is conflicted, but he is finding all kinds of excuses to justify his acceptance.

Elsewhere, intra-party affairs and disputes seem to be distracting some of the leaders. Instead of seeking to implement changes and ideas, too much time is being spent on politicking.

The former premier has adopted a “make-a statement-a-day” routine and our ministers are keeping him relevant by responding and making him important. He ought to be told the literal meaning of the legal doctrine of “those seeking equity must come with clean hands”.

‘No more political appointees in government-linked companies’ was the battle pre-May 9. The head honchos who made up the pancaragam which composed and sang BN’s campaign song found themselves out of their jobs. So, did scores of others, but who were their replacements?

On the administration side, there is little visible change. It still takes ages for some government departments to respond to letters; the “pegawai pergi mesyuarat” (the officer’s in a meeting) slogan is frequently used to avoid contact with citizens and other old practices. Self-appointed regulators of public morals are still imposing their values, including dress codes on visitors. They seem more interested in the length of the skirts than the issues they have to address.

Why haven’t they been reined in? Yet again, the answer would be: “It is a sensitive issue.” Many are reluctant and refuse to adopt Transport Minister Anthony Loke’s diktats – those who find female flight attendants’ uniforms too sexy should turn their heads away and not look at them.

The only visible change is the move to do away with the sign-off, which means nothing. From “saya yang menurut perintah” (I’m just following orders), it has become “saya yang menjalankan amanah” (I’m just following the mandate). Everything else including mindsets remain status quo. How does it help improvise delivery?

The attitude and brashness of most civil servants has not changed. They seem stuck in the old culture, and continue to act as Little Napoleons ruling their own fiefdom.

Public opinion matters little to Harapan lawmakers, who now believe they can walk on water. The mainstream media which pilloried, denounced and humiliated them when they were on the wrong side of the divide, has suddenly changed tack. These days, the editors (and censors) are now lining up to “pay homage” to very same leaders they had once pounced on, like vultures devouring a carcass.

Instead of using its new-found freedom and being objective, it wants to continue its insalubrious role as the supporter of the ruling elite. There has hardly been a whimper on the weaknesses which are so visible. Every citizen including journalists has a right to demand explanations on expenditure and policies because this government promised transparency and accountability.

Asking questions and requesting for justification does not make anyone a lesser Malaysian.

R NADESWARAN has no party affiliation and believes that the it is not an offence to hold government accountable. A good government must priorities good governance. Comments: citizen.nades22@gmail.com

The views expressed here are those of the author/contributor and do not necessarily represent the views of Malaysiakini.