Double 7-Down Memory Lane


May 21. 2016

Double 7–Down Memory Lane with Songs

For my special Double 7 Birthday, I skyped Dr. Kamsiah this evening to ask her what I should do to entertain you. She suggested that we play tunes of the ‘ 40s, ’50s. ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. In addition, I have added my all time favorite voice, Nat Cole. Once you have listened to the crooner with a velvet voice, you will perhaps understand why Nat remains my special man through the last  6 decades.

I hope, you like what we have chosen to play for you this weekend. Be of good cheer, my friends. Pursue your dreams and make them real, I say. Thank you for your good wishes for my Double 7 and for your continued support of and interest in the Malaysian DJ Blogger.– Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican

Best of the ’60s

Best of the ’70s

Best of the ’80s

Din Merican’s All Time Favorite –Nat Cole

Your Weekend Bash: Afro-Cuban Jazz


April 3, 2016

Your Weekend Bash: Introducing Flutist Herbie Mann and Afro-Cuban Jazz

Guys,

Dr. Kamsiah Haider is taking a break after two day visit to Bangkok where she attended an orthodontics course conducted by Taiwan’s renown Orthodontist, Dr. Chris Chang.  So, it is my pleasant task to be your solo host for this weekend. I have chosen to feature Herbie Mann, the jazz flutist and Afro-Cuban/Latin  Jazz exponent. I first heard of Herbie when I was a student in Washington  DC in the late Sixties (1968 to be exact). His renditions of Memphis Underground and Push Push were what attracted me to his music. I will play them shortly for you.  But first this album, Herbie Mann-Bossa Nova.

Herbie Mann was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Jewish parents, Harry C. Solomon (May 30, 1902 – May 31, 1980), who was of Russian descent, and Ruth Rose Solomon (née Brecher) (July 4, 1905 – November 11, 2004), who was born in Bukovina, Austria-Hungary but immigrated to the United States with her family at the age of 6. Both of his parents were dancers and singers, as well as dance instructors later in life.He attended Lincoln High School in Brighton Beach. His first professional performance was playing the Catskills resorts at age 15. In the 1950s Mann was primarily a bop flutist, playing in combos with artists such as Phil Woods, occasionally playing bass clarinet, tenor saxophone and solo flute.

Herbie was an early pioneer of the fusion of jazz and world music.[citation needed] In 1959, following a State Department sponsored tour of Africa, he recorded Flautista!, an album of Afro-Cuban jazz. In 1961 Mann toured Brazil, returning to the United States to record with Brazilian musicians, including Antonio Carlos Jobim and guitarist Baden Powell. These albums helped popularize bossa nova in the US and Europe. He often worked with Brazilian themes. In the mid-1960s Mann hired a young Chick Corea to play in some of his bands. In the late 1970s and early 1980s Mann played duets at New York City’s The Bottom Line and Village Gate clubs, with Sarod virtuoso Vasant Rai.

Following the 1969 hit album Memphis Underground, a number of disco-style smooth jazz records brought criticism from jazz purists but allowed Mann to remain active during a period of declining interest in jazz. The musicians on these recordings are some of the best-known session players in soul and jazz, including singer Cissy Houston (mother of Whitney Houston), guitarists Duane Allman and Larry Coryell, bassists Donald “Duck” Dunn and Chuck Rainey and drummers Al Jackson, Jr. and Bernard Purdie. In this period Mann had a number of pop hits — rare for a jazz musician. According to a 1998 interview Mann had made at least 25 albums that were on the Billboard 200 pop charts, success denied most of his jazz peers.”[6]

Mann provided the music for the 1978 National Film Board of Canada animated short Afterlife, by Ishu Patel.

In the early 1970s he founded his own label, Embryo Records, distributed by Cotillion Records, a division of Atlantic Records.[7] Embryo produced jazz albums, such as Ron Carter‘s Uptown Conversation (1970); Miroslav Vitous‘ first solo album, Infinite Search (1969); Phil Woods and his European Rhythm Machine at the Frankfurt Jazz Festival (1971); and Dick Morrissey and Jim Mullen‘s Up (1976), which featured the Average White Band as a rhythm section; and the 730 Series, with a more rock-oriented style, including Zero Time (1971) by TONTO’s Expanding Head Band. He later set up Kokopelli Records after difficulty with established labels. In 1996, Mann collaborated with Stereolab on the song “One Note Samba/Surfboard” for the AIDS-Benefit album Red Hot + Rio produced by the Red Hot Organization. Mann also played horns on the Bee Gees‘ album Spirits Having Flown.

His last appearance was on May 3, 2003, at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and he died less than two months later on July 1, 2003, at the age of 73, after a long battle with prostate cancer. He died in his home in Pecos, New Mexico, leaving his wife, Susan Janeal Arison, and four children: Paul Mann, Claudia Mann, Laura Mann-Lepik and Geoffrey Mann.–wikipedia.

Memphis Underground (1969)

Push Push (1970)

Our good wishes for this Sunday.–Dr. Kamsiah  Haider and Din Merican

 

 

Your Weekend with the Incomparable Mr Johnny Mathis


 

March 26, 2016

Your Weekend with the Incomparable Mr Johnny Mathis

Dr. Kamsiah Haider and Din Merican present the man with a golden voice. In the  196os and 1970s, Johnny Mathis was a star with a unique singing style. We let his voice and music  speak for him. But before that, here is a brief introduction.

JohnJohnnyMathis (born September 30, 1935) is an American singer of popular music and jazz. Starting his career with singles of standard music, he became highly popular as an album artist, with several dozen of his albums achieving gold or platinum status and 73 making the Billboard charts to date. Johnny Mathis has sold well over 350 million records worldwide,] according to Guinness Book of World Records writer and charts music historian Paul Gambaccini and other sources. This makes Mathis the third biggest selling artist of the 20th century.

Johnny Mathis.JPG

Although he is frequently described as a romantic singer, his discography includes jazz, traditional pop, Brazilian music, Spanish music, soul music, rhythm and blues, soft rock, Broadway theatre, Tin Pan Alley standards, some blues and country songs, and even a few disco songs for his album Mathis Magic in 1979. Mathis also recorded six albums of Christmas music. In a 1968 interview, Mathis cited Lena Horne, Nat King Cole, and Bing Crosby among his musical influence.–wikipedia

 Special Guest–Jack Jones

Bringing back Jazz for the Weekend–The Divas


inging back Jazz for the Weekend–The Divas

Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican bring jazz for this weekend featuring three jazz divas–Ella, Diana and Sarah and special guest, the seductive Nancy Wilson–who left their indelible imprint on jazz. They need no introduction. We will leave their fabulous voices to bear witness to their vocal talents.

Before that, Din will to play this Joni James number titled Coming from You and also Why Don’t you believe Me for his good friend, Cheam Tat Pang, who deserves to remembered for his many personal kindnesses and most of all for his friendship. Joni James is Tat Pang’s favorite lady of song.

Din says that he is privileged to have many good friends who are genuine Malaysians, too numerous to be singled out and others in Cambodia and around the world. Enjoy your weekend.–Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican

 Ella Fitzgerald–The First Lady of Jazz

Diana Washington

The Seductive Nancy Wilson

 

 

President Barack Obama and Southeast Asian Leaders @ SunnyLands


February 16, 2016

President Barack Obama and Southeast Asian Leaders @SunnyLands Summit

by Reuters

U.S. President Barack Obama makes opening remarks at the 10-nation Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, California February 15, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

U.S. President Barack Obama makes opening remarks at the 10-nation Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) summit at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, California February 15, 2016. Photo: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

President Barack Obama gathered leaders from Southeast Asia on Monday to strengthen trade ties and form a common stance on the South China Sea in a summit the White House hopes will solidify U.S. influence in the region.

Obama, who leaves office next year, has championed a foreign policy pivot to Asia during his presidency and is determined to present the United States as a Pacific power.

His meeting with leaders from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was aimed at cementing that legacy.

“This reflects my personal commitment, and the national commitment of the United States, to a strong and enduring partnership with your 10 nations,” he said at the start of the two-day summit at Sunnylands, a California resort.

The meeting, at the same location where Obama once hosted Chinese President Xi Jinping, was designed to demonstrate Washington’s role as a counterweight to Beijing and as an eager trading partner with ASEAN members.

National Security Adviser Susan Rice told reporters that U.S. companies had more than doubled investment in the region since 2008.

On Monday the leaders were slated to focus on economic issues, including discussion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal, which includes four ASEAN members: Vietnam, Singapore, Brunei and Malaysia. Others are interested in joining, and the White House wants to make sure the pact takes effect.

On Tuesday, the leaders will discuss maritime issues, particularly the South China Sea, where China and several Southeast Asian states have conflicting and overlapping claims.

White House officials have said Obama would deliver a tough message to China that disputes over the South China Sea must be resolved peacefully and not by bullying.

“Here at this summit, we can advance our shared vision of a regional order where international rules and norms, including freedom of navigation, are upheld and where disputes are resolved through peaceful, legal means,” Obama said.

The challenge may be to get all ASEAN countries to agree on a strong statement on the issue. Officials say China has put pressure on countries such as Cambodia and Laos not to sign on.”I’m … confident that our shared commitment to upholding these norms will be reinforced,” Rice said.

China’s role in the region hung over the meeting. Rice said she expected China would support new international sanctions on North Korea for its recent rocket launches.

Advocacy group Human Rights Watch urged the Obama administration to object to human rights violations in countries such as Cambodia and Thailand during the summit.

The President touched on the issue without specifics during his remarks. “Here at the summit, we can reaffirm that strong, prosperous and inclusive societies require good governance, rule of law, accountable institutions, vibrant civil societies and upholding human rights,” he said.

Combating climate change and cooperating on counter-terrorism and the fight against Islamic State militants were also on the agenda.

Obama returns to Washington on Tuesday.

Your Weekend Entertainment: Back to ’60s


January 30, 2016

Your Entertainment: Back to 1960’s

Malaysia-Land of Beauty and Harmony but Destroyed By Corruption and Inept  Najib’s UMNO Governance

99600626-dave-brubeck-speaks-during-the-2010-george-gettyimages

Generated by IJG JPEG Library

Dr. Dave Brubeck@ The George Washington University–Simply The Best

Dr. Kamsiah who is now in Sarawak on a volunteer mission and Din Merican in Phnom Penh bring back memories of the music of the Golden Sixties. It was a period when we Malaysians were living harmoniously with  one and another, despite the Cold War which was raging in Southeast Asia. That changed when some politicians in our country decided that it was time to play politics with race; and that culminated in the May 13, 1969 riots.

Today, we seem to have forgotten that tragic episode. Our besieged Prime Minister is allowing Malay extremists in UMNO, and mullahs and bigots to play with race and religion, leaving us in a state of tension. We hope he knows what he is doing by engaging in this politics of divide and rule. We should show him and UMNO that we are not going to be drawn into his game and destroy our country.

Let us take good care of our Malaysia. Enjoy the weekend with the music of the Sixties. Let us do the peppermint twist under the Blue Moon .  –Dr Kamsiah and Din Merican