Jazz Time from Phnom Penh


July 30, 2015

Jazz Time in Phnom Time

It is the  time of the week (Saturday) for us to get away from it all–the cares and woes, the hustle and bustle,  the noise from angry voices, and politics– and just relax.

Phnom Penh is  a unique city. There are plenty of places to go for a good meal with friends and enjoy the music. The FCC (Foreign Correspondents Club) by the Riverside, for example, is a popular spot for the curious and adventurous. If you come to Phnom Penh, go there and listen to jazz, enjoy a great meal, and meet tourists, journalists,  and the English speaking educated locals who frequent the FCC to sit back and relax.

So in that spirit, Dr. Kamsiah who is in Kuala Lumpur where she is attending her nephew’s marriage dinner at The Tropicana Golf Club and Din Merican  who is blogging in Phnom Penh present The Dave Brubeck  Quartet .

Jazz Pianist Dave Brubeck and his colleagues (Paul Desmond on Alto, Joe Morello on Drums and Eugene Wright on Bass) need no introduction. Din is proud to say that  David “Dave” Warren Brubeck (December 6, 1920 – December 5, 2012) was äwarded an Honorary Doctorate in Music in May, 2010 for his contributions to American music and culture by his alma mater, The George Washington University. Listen to The Quartet and you know why Dr. Dave Brubeck deserved to be remembered.–Din Merican

Tribute to Frank Sinatra and His City: NEW YORK, the City that never sleeps


June 26, 2016

New York

Tribute to Frank Sinatra and His City: NEW YORK, the City that never sleeps

Friends,

New York’s Son and Golden Voice–We miss you, Frank

Sunday in New York. And beautiful day. Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican send you and yours our warm greetings from this fabulous city and financial capital of the world. Both of us have been busy with our respective professional duties. Things have worked out well for us and we must admit that being in the Big Apple is always business like, rejuvenating (despite the jet lag) and fun.

What better way  can we pay tribute and respects to this city and its people for their kindness and hospitality and honour the memory of its illustrious son than to feature  Hoboken (New Jersey)-born Francis Albert Sinatra for your weekend entertainment.  Thank You, New York.–Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican

 

Double 7-Down Memory Lane


May 21. 2016

Double 7–Down Memory Lane with Songs

For my special Double 7 Birthday, I skyped Dr. Kamsiah this evening to ask her what I should do to entertain you. She suggested that we play tunes of the ‘ 40s, ’50s. ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. In addition, I have added my all time favorite voice, Nat Cole. Once you have listened to the crooner with a velvet voice, you will perhaps understand why Nat remains my special man through the last  6 decades.

I hope, you like what we have chosen to play for you this weekend. Be of good cheer, my friends. Pursue your dreams and make them real, I say. Thank you for your good wishes for my Double 7 and for your continued support of and interest in the Malaysian DJ Blogger.– Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican

Best of the ’60s

Best of the ’70s

Best of the ’80s

Din Merican’s All Time Favorite –Nat Cole

Your Weekend Bash: Afro-Cuban Jazz


April 3, 2016

Your Weekend Bash: Introducing Flutist Herbie Mann and Afro-Cuban Jazz

Guys,

Dr. Kamsiah Haider is taking a break after two day visit to Bangkok where she attended an orthodontics course conducted by Taiwan’s renown Orthodontist, Dr. Chris Chang.  So, it is my pleasant task to be your solo host for this weekend. I have chosen to feature Herbie Mann, the jazz flutist and Afro-Cuban/Latin  Jazz exponent. I first heard of Herbie when I was a student in Washington  DC in the late Sixties (1968 to be exact). His renditions of Memphis Underground and Push Push were what attracted me to his music. I will play them shortly for you.  But first this album, Herbie Mann-Bossa Nova.

Herbie Mann was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Jewish parents, Harry C. Solomon (May 30, 1902 – May 31, 1980), who was of Russian descent, and Ruth Rose Solomon (née Brecher) (July 4, 1905 – November 11, 2004), who was born in Bukovina, Austria-Hungary but immigrated to the United States with her family at the age of 6. Both of his parents were dancers and singers, as well as dance instructors later in life.He attended Lincoln High School in Brighton Beach. His first professional performance was playing the Catskills resorts at age 15. In the 1950s Mann was primarily a bop flutist, playing in combos with artists such as Phil Woods, occasionally playing bass clarinet, tenor saxophone and solo flute.

Herbie was an early pioneer of the fusion of jazz and world music.[citation needed] In 1959, following a State Department sponsored tour of Africa, he recorded Flautista!, an album of Afro-Cuban jazz. In 1961 Mann toured Brazil, returning to the United States to record with Brazilian musicians, including Antonio Carlos Jobim and guitarist Baden Powell. These albums helped popularize bossa nova in the US and Europe. He often worked with Brazilian themes. In the mid-1960s Mann hired a young Chick Corea to play in some of his bands. In the late 1970s and early 1980s Mann played duets at New York City’s The Bottom Line and Village Gate clubs, with Sarod virtuoso Vasant Rai.

Following the 1969 hit album Memphis Underground, a number of disco-style smooth jazz records brought criticism from jazz purists but allowed Mann to remain active during a period of declining interest in jazz. The musicians on these recordings are some of the best-known session players in soul and jazz, including singer Cissy Houston (mother of Whitney Houston), guitarists Duane Allman and Larry Coryell, bassists Donald “Duck” Dunn and Chuck Rainey and drummers Al Jackson, Jr. and Bernard Purdie. In this period Mann had a number of pop hits — rare for a jazz musician. According to a 1998 interview Mann had made at least 25 albums that were on the Billboard 200 pop charts, success denied most of his jazz peers.”[6]

Mann provided the music for the 1978 National Film Board of Canada animated short Afterlife, by Ishu Patel.

In the early 1970s he founded his own label, Embryo Records, distributed by Cotillion Records, a division of Atlantic Records.[7] Embryo produced jazz albums, such as Ron Carter‘s Uptown Conversation (1970); Miroslav Vitous‘ first solo album, Infinite Search (1969); Phil Woods and his European Rhythm Machine at the Frankfurt Jazz Festival (1971); and Dick Morrissey and Jim Mullen‘s Up (1976), which featured the Average White Band as a rhythm section; and the 730 Series, with a more rock-oriented style, including Zero Time (1971) by TONTO’s Expanding Head Band. He later set up Kokopelli Records after difficulty with established labels. In 1996, Mann collaborated with Stereolab on the song “One Note Samba/Surfboard” for the AIDS-Benefit album Red Hot + Rio produced by the Red Hot Organization. Mann also played horns on the Bee Gees‘ album Spirits Having Flown.

His last appearance was on May 3, 2003, at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and he died less than two months later on July 1, 2003, at the age of 73, after a long battle with prostate cancer. He died in his home in Pecos, New Mexico, leaving his wife, Susan Janeal Arison, and four children: Paul Mann, Claudia Mann, Laura Mann-Lepik and Geoffrey Mann.–wikipedia.

Memphis Underground (1969)

Push Push (1970)

Our good wishes for this Sunday.–Dr. Kamsiah  Haider and Din Merican

 

 

Your Weekend with the Incomparable Mr Johnny Mathis


 

March 26, 2016

Your Weekend with the Incomparable Mr Johnny Mathis

Dr. Kamsiah Haider and Din Merican present the man with a golden voice. In the  196os and 1970s, Johnny Mathis was a star with a unique singing style. We let his voice and music  speak for him. But before that, here is a brief introduction.

JohnJohnnyMathis (born September 30, 1935) is an American singer of popular music and jazz. Starting his career with singles of standard music, he became highly popular as an album artist, with several dozen of his albums achieving gold or platinum status and 73 making the Billboard charts to date. Johnny Mathis has sold well over 350 million records worldwide,] according to Guinness Book of World Records writer and charts music historian Paul Gambaccini and other sources. This makes Mathis the third biggest selling artist of the 20th century.

Johnny Mathis.JPG

Although he is frequently described as a romantic singer, his discography includes jazz, traditional pop, Brazilian music, Spanish music, soul music, rhythm and blues, soft rock, Broadway theatre, Tin Pan Alley standards, some blues and country songs, and even a few disco songs for his album Mathis Magic in 1979. Mathis also recorded six albums of Christmas music. In a 1968 interview, Mathis cited Lena Horne, Nat King Cole, and Bing Crosby among his musical influence.–wikipedia

 Special Guest–Jack Jones

Bringing back Jazz for the Weekend–The Divas


inging back Jazz for the Weekend–The Divas

Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican bring jazz for this weekend featuring three jazz divas–Ella, Diana and Sarah and special guest, the seductive Nancy Wilson–who left their indelible imprint on jazz. They need no introduction. We will leave their fabulous voices to bear witness to their vocal talents.

Before that, Din will to play this Joni James number titled Coming from You and also Why Don’t you believe Me for his good friend, Cheam Tat Pang, who deserves to remembered for his many personal kindnesses and most of all for his friendship. Joni James is Tat Pang’s favorite lady of song.

Din says that he is privileged to have many good friends who are genuine Malaysians, too numerous to be singled out and others in Cambodia and around the world. Enjoy your weekend.–Dr. Kamsiah and Din Merican

 Ella Fitzgerald–The First Lady of Jazz

Diana Washington

The Seductive Nancy Wilson