Trump–Najib White House Meet in September, 2017


April 24, 2018

Trump–Najib White House Meet in September, 2017

By Bradley Hope,Rebecca Ballhaus and Tom Wright

http://www.wsj.com

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Donald J. Trump–The Art of the Deal

Najib Razak, whose administration is at the center of the 1MDB corruption probe, may use the trip to play down the risk of further investigations

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/08/23/statement-press-secretary-visit-prime-minister-najib-abdul-razak

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, whose administration is at the center of a major corruption probe by the U.S. Department of Justice, will visit President Donald Trump in September in Washington, according to a White House official and several people in Malaysia familiar with plans for the trip.

Mr. Najib has been eager to emphasize his friendship with Mr. Trump at a time of U.S. scrutiny over alleged corruption in the Malaysian administration. People close to Mr. Najib say he would likely use the White House visit to try to play down the possibility of further investigations. A spokesman for Mr. Najib declined to comment.

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The Justice Department, in lawsuits filed in 2016 and updated in June, alleged that Mr. Najib received $681 million and his stepson, Riza Aziz, received $238 million originating from a state development fund called 1Malaysia Development Bhd.

The fund is the subject of one of the world’s biggest alleged frauds, with a total of more than $4.5 billion allegedly stolen. At least six countries are probing the affair, including Singapore and Switzerland.

The 1MDB issue is one of the most pressing problems for Mr. Razak’s administration in the run-up to elections expected in 2018. Nonetheless, Malaysia and the U.S. have many areas of mutual concern, including China’s expansion of military power in the South China Sea.

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Golf with Trump next?

Mr. Najib has had warm ties with recent U.S. administrations. He has boasted to a Malaysian newspaper and other media that he partnered with Mr. Trump at golf several years ago. Mr. Najib and Mr. Trump won the game, according to Malaysian media reports, and Mr. Najib said he has a signed picture of them together at the event, with an inscription from Mr. Trump: “To my favorite Prime Minister. Great win!” Mr. Najib also played golf with then-President Barack Obama.

Related imageMalaysia’s rich and powerful First Lady of Malaysia and her soulmate Grace Mugabe (below)
 

 

The U.S. suit in June also alleged that Mr. Najib’s wife received a $27 million diamond necklace paid for by funds embezzled from 1MDB. Much of the money Mr. Najib received was returned to the offshore company that sent it to him, court filings show. Mr. Najib and Mr. Aziz have repeatedly denied wrongdoing.

1MDB itself has denied wrongdoing or that any money is missing. It has pledged to work with any lawful authority. Mr. Najib’s wife, Rosmah Mansor, hasn’t responded to the allegations.

The U.S. allegations are contained in a series of civil asset forfeiture cases, in which the U.S. government is seeking to seize $1.7 billion’s worth of homes, artwork, a mega-yacht and company stakes, among other items it says were bought with embezzled funds. The suits only target assets and don’t allege crimes against individuals.

Earlier in August, the Justice Department filed a motion to stay all those cases while it conducts a criminal investigation.

The civil cases identify Jho Low, a Malaysian financier close to Mr. Najib’s family, as the central orchestrator of the alleged scheme. Mr. Low has denied the charges and pledged to fight them in court.

Mr. Najib and his wife, Ms. Rosmah, aren’t named in the civil suits, but are referred to as Malaysian Official 1 and wife of Malaysian Official 1. A government minister has publicly confirmed Mr. Najib is Malaysian Official 1. Mr. Najib’s stepson is also named in the suits.

The Prime Minister has repeatedly denied 1MDB was defrauded and that any money went missing. He created the fund in 2009 to help drive investment in Malaysia and as finance minister he was the final authority for making decisions.

In 2016, Mr. Najib hired Ashcroft Law Firm LLC, headed by former U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft, to advise him on the 1MDB case, according to people familiar with the matter. Mr. Najib and Mr. Aziz, and Mr. Aziz’s film production company, are also represented by Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP.

Amid investigations by several Malaysian authorities into 1MDB in 2015, Mr. Najib replaced his Attorney General over his handling of the case. The new Attorney General (Mr. Apandi Ali) announced his own review of the evidence, found no wrongdoing and closed the case.

Mr. Najib and his supporters have repeatedly said the 1MDB affair is hyped by the political opposition—led by former prime minister Mahathir Mohamad—in an effort to oust Mr. Najib and the ruling UMNO party.

—Yantoultra Ngui in Kuala Lumpur contributed to this article.

Write to Bradley Hope at bradley.hope@wsj.com, Rebecca Ballhaus at Rebecca.Ballhaus@wsj.com and Tom Wright at tom.wright@wsj.com

Trump and Racism: A Moral Failure that shames America


August 16, 2017

Trump and Racism: A Moral Failure that shames America

Editorial

The Guardian view on Donald Trump and racism: a moral failure that shames America

No previous US President of modern times would have failed to condemn his country’s white nationalists. This one did.

As George W Bush’s speechwriter put it this weekend, it is one of the “difficult but primary duties” of a political leader to speak for a nation in traumatic times. A space shuttle explodes, a school student goes on a shooting spree, a terrorist flies a plane into a building, a hurricane floods a city. When such things happen, Michael Gerson wrote in the Washington Post, “It falls to the president to express something of the nation’s soul.” Yet if Donald Trump’s words about the violent white extremist mobilisation in Virginia on Saturday – which an under-pressure White House was desperately trying to clarify on Sunday – are an expression of its soul, America may be on the road to perdition.

The original United States of America was built on white supremacy. The US constitution of 1787 treated black slaves as equivalent to three-fifths of a free white and gave no rights at all to Native Americans, who were regarded as belonging to their own nations. After the civil war, Jim Crow laws enforced segregation across the defeated south and comprehensively disfranchised African Americans for nearly a century. Writing Mein Kampf in the 1920s, Adolf Hitler praised America’s institutional racism as a model from which Nazi Germany could learn. Only in the postwar period, and then slowly and incompletely, was meaningful racial equality pursued by the land of the free.

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America Gone Crazy

Yet, while American racism has extremely deep and tenacious historical roots, without which the events in Virginia on Saturday cannot be properly understood, some large things have changed for the better over the past 60 or so years. Equal rights have been enforced. Equality has been embraced. America has elected a black president. It would be difficult to imagine any US president of this more recent period, of whatever party, who would not have responded to the neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Charlottesville with anything except explicit condemnation and disgust. Any president, that is, until this one.

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There is absolutely no moral equivalence between the fanatical white supremacists who rallied in the Virginia city on Saturday and the equality defenders who demonstrated peacefully against them, one of whom was rammed and killed by a speeding car allegedly driven by a man who had attended the neo-Nazi rally. The supremacists hate black people and Jews, and regard white people as superior. They talk portentously about blood, soil and the right to bear arms. They admire Hitler and give Nazi salutes. They fly the flags of the pro-slavery Confederacy – the ostensible cause of their rallies this summer is Charlottesville’s decision, more than 150 years after the south’s surrender, to remove a statue of Robert E Lee from a park. And one of them committed the sort of act that was rightly called terrorism when it occurred in Nice, Berlin and London.

Yet, in his first response on Saturday, Mr Trump utterly failed in his primary duty to uphold equality and speak the truth about the racist violence that had taken place. Instead of placing the blame where it belonged, on the supremacists and Klansmen who triggered these events, and rather than stand up for the indivisibility of equality and tolerance before the law, Mr Trump’s words were by turns slippery, banal and morally compromised. It was not true that the violence in Charlottesville came from “many sides”, as Mr Trump evasively said, before repeating his evasion. It is the head of state’s duty to stand up, explicitly and unequivocally, against racists and those who promote racial violence. Mr Trump was found wanting.

That would not have happened under Mr Bush, for all his faults. Nor is it true of top Republicans like Cory Gardner, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Orrin Hatch, none of them social liberals, who were all quick to call the supremacists out. Even the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, who is few people’s idea of an ideological exemplar, condemned the racists. But Mr Trump did not.

Image result for David Duke and the Ku Klux Klan

It is hard to believe that the omission was an oversight and hard to treat it merely as a reminder of Mr Trump’s inadequacy for the presidency. The concern is that Mr Trump’s blathering was wholly deliberate until the White House got worried by the reaction. The worry is that he recognises that his election has empowered angry white people, including those who describe themselves as “alt-right” but who should be called what they are – white supremacists. The hope is that this dishonest and morally shaming moment will define Mr Trump for sufficient decent Americans that he will not be trusted again. Sadly, the evidence of modern America gives too few grounds for optimism.

Great Leadership


August 12, 2017

Great Leadership

by Kishore Mahbubani*and Klaus Schwab

http://www.project-syndicate. org

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/twenty-first-century-leadership-qualities-by-kishore-mahbubani-and-klaus-schwab-2017-08

*Dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, is the co-author with Jeffery Sng of The ASEAN Miracle: A Catalyst for Peace. He was selected as one of Prospect magazine’s top 50 world thinkers in 2014.

 

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Buddhist Philosophy–Its Value for Humanity


August 7, 2017

by Antonio Damaso

http://www.nytimes.com–Book Review

Anyone writing (or reading) about Buddhism faces a critical question. What is Buddhism, really? A religion, complete with supernatural deities and reincarnation? A secular philosophy of life? A therapeutic practice? An ideology? All of the above? Robert Wright sketches an answer early in “Why Buddhism Is True.” He settles on a credible blend that one might call Western Buddhism, a largely secular approach to life and its problems but not devoid of a spiritual dimension. The centerpiece of the approach is the practice of mindful meditation.

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The goal of “Why Buddhism Is True” is ambitious: to demonstrate “that Buddhism’s diagnosis of the human predicament is fundamentally correct, and that its prescription is deeply valid and urgently important.” It is reasonable to claim that Buddhism, with its focus on suffering, addresses critical aspects of the human predicament. It is also reasonable to suggest that the prescription it offers may be applicable and useful to resolve that predicament.

To produce his demonstrations and to support the idea that Buddhism is “true,” Wright relies on science, especially on evolutionary psychology, cognitive science and neuroscience.

This is a sensible approach, and in relation to Buddhism it is almost mainstream. Over the years, in a number of encounters, I have found the Dalai Lama and those around him to be keenly interested in science. Wright is up to the task: He’s a Buddhist who has written about religion and morality from a scientific perspective — he is most famous for his 1994 book, “The Moral Animal.”

My take on Wright’s fundamental proposals is as follows. First, the beneficial powers of meditation come from the possibility of realizing that our emotive reactions and the consequent feelings they engender — which operate in automated fashion, outside our deliberate control — are often inappropriate and even counterproductive relative to the situations that trigger them. Second, the mismatch between causes and responses is rooted in evolution. We have inherited from our nonhuman and human forerunners a complex affect apparatus suited to life circumstances very different from ours. That apparatus — which is controlled from varied sectors of our nervous systems — was created by natural selection and assisted by genetic transmission over a long period of time.

It worked well for nonhuman primates and later for human hunter gatherers, but it has worked far less well as cultures became more complex. Third, meditation allows us to realize that the idea of the self as director of our decisions is an illusion, and that the degree to which we are at the mercy of a weakly controlled system places us at a considerable disadvantage. Fourth, the awareness brought on by meditation helps the construction of a truly enlightened humanity and counters the growing tribalism of contemporary societies.

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Wright’s book is provocative, informative and, in many respects, deeply rewarding. A good example is Wright’s description of his first full entry into the realm of mindfulness. Arriving at this new mental state generated in him an intense emotive response and a memorable feeling that Wright evokes with suggestive but spare prose. It rings true. This scene lets the reader glimpse the power of mindful meditation and be intrigued, even seduced, by the transformative potential of the practice. I found myself not just agreeing but applauding the author, on a number of passages. A case in point is his unflinching embrace of the notion of feeling, which he understands as the mental experiences of physiological states, states imbued with a valence ranging from positive and pleasant to negative and unpleasant. He is referring to phenomena in the mind, private to each specific human being and not inspectable by others. He does not confuse feelings with emotions, which are public and can be inspected by others. Surprisingly, this distinction between feeling and emotion is often glossed over not just in popular accounts but also in the scientific literature. And yet, it is fundamental for the understanding of how living organisms with nervous systems can behave, develop conscious experiences and construct individual minds, sociality and cultures.

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Wright is not as persuasive when he attempts to establish the truth of Buddhism by considering the circumstances in which feelings arise. He readily admits the value of feelings as basic guides to the way we run our lives. For example, feelings can express states of our physiology by letting us experience thirst and hunger and satiety and pain and well-being. He designates such feelings as “true” because their experience is congruent with the organism’s state of need or lack thereof. But when, in modern life, emotions such as fear and anger are incorrectly and unnecessarily engaged — for example, road rage — Wright calls the respective feelings “false” or “illusory.” Such feelings, however, are no less true than the thirst, hunger or pain that Wright accepts and welcomes. When we feel road rage, the feeling faithfully depicts the disturbed state of our physiology brought about by anger. That feeling is just as true as the feeling of pain after we suffer a wound. Practical inadequacy is the issue, not lack of truth.

More often than not, we gain from subjecting the recommendations of any feelings to the scrutiny of reason. With some exceptions — situations of panic being an example — emotions and the feelings they engender need to be judged by reason, in the light of knowledge, before we let them guide our behavior. Even “good” feelings such as empathy, compassion and gratitude benefit from distance and discernment.

We can agree that mindful meditation promotes a distancing effect and thus may increase our chances of combining affect and reason advantageously. Meditation can help us glean the especially flawed and dislocated status of humans in modern societies, and help us see how social and political conflicts appear to provoke resentment and anger so easily. Over and above the personal benefits of meditation one can imagine that populations engaged in such practices would expand their awareness of the inadequacy and futility of some of our affective responses. In turn, that would contribute to creating healthier and less conflicted societies, one person at a time.

But there are important questions to be raised here. How does one scale up, from many single individuals to populations, in time to prevent the social catastrophes that seem to be looming? I also wonder if, for some individuals, the successful practice of meditation and the actual reduction of the anxieties of daily life is not more likely to induce equanimity regarding social crises than the desire to resolve those crises with inventive cultural solutions. Individual therapy and the salvation of society are not incompatible, of course, but I suspect they can be easily uncoupled.

Wright correctly defends the view that the self as director of operations and decider of one’s actions is an illusion. I could not agree more. But there is an important distinction to be made between the idea of self as mastermind and chief executive officer, and the process of subjectivity. The self appears fragmented, in daily life and in meditative states, but subjectivity does not break down. It never disappears, or we simply would be unable to observe the fragmentation in the first place.

I would venture that in most meditative states some subjectivity remains, as representative of the biological interests of the individual. As far as I can imagine, the complete disappearance of a subjective view would result in a “view from nowhere.” But whose view would that be, then? And if not ours, how would we come to know let alone seek such a view, such an emptiness? Mindful meditation is no stranger to the world of paradox. Is there anything stranger than discovering the pleasures of not feeling?

Antonio Damasio directs the USC Brain and Creativity Institute. He is the author of a number of books, including “Self Comes to Mind: Constructing the Conscious Brain.”

A Week of Fakery in Global Politics


August 5, 2017

A Week of Fakery in Global Politics

by Dean Johns@www.malaysiakini.com

Image result for The Mooch fired

All you have to do is to work for Donald Trump

Though there’s a long, long way to go before we can hope to defeat the dark forces of fake news and false views, at least we have had a few small wins against them this week.

In China, for example, the country that still fakes it as Communist despite having turned capitalist, remains a Party dictatorship despite claiming to be a “People’s’ Republic”, and continues as ever to control its people with a system of fake news and secrecy, the state censors have been forced to make fools of themselves by banning not just Facebook and Twitter as usual, but now also internet mentions and images of Winnie the Pooh.

According to Australia’s ABC News website, netizens in China have been poking fun at President Xi Jinping by drawing attention to his striking resemblance to the famous ‘bear of little brain’. This has not impressed the powers that be, apparently, especially with the 19th Party Congress approaching.

Of course the banning of Winnie the Pooh will not make the slightest difference to Xi Jinnie the Pooh’s regime, let alone bring it down, but at least it will render it a little more of a laughing-stock both at home and abroad.

Though not so much a laughing-stock, I grant you, as Trump and his fellow fakewits have been making of themselves, their supporters and by extension the US in general every week for their past six months in the White House.

And especially this past week, with the firing of foul-mouthed fakewit Anthony Scaramucci–The Mooch– from his job just 10 days after he was hired.

Image result for australian prime minister malcolm turnbull with Trump

Then came the Australian connection, with the publication of the transcript of a phone conversation that Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull had with Donald Trump shortly after he was installed in the Oval Office.

At the time Trump was widely criticized, at least by the Australian media, for his reportedly hostile treatment of Turnbull, and for allegedly angrily and abruptly ending the conversation.

But while the transcript reveals all this to be true to a considerable extent, it also reveals Turnbull as something of a fakewit for having previously falsely represented his side of the conversation about the terms of a refugee-exchange deal previously made with former President Obama.

Turnbull and his immigration minister, Senator Peter Dutton, have long claimed that the deal was not intended as some cynical, self-serving “people-swap”, and the transcript revealed that’s exactly what it was.

Both were cynical and self-serving, in that Turnbull and Dutton’s motives for making the deal clearly had everything to do with their political concerns, and little if any care for the well-being of the people who have so long languished in Australia’s dismal offshore detention centres.

If this revelation had been the only sign of fakewittedness in Australia’s Turnbull-led Liberal-National Coalition government lately, it probably would not have been terribly damaging to its prospects at the next election.

But coming as it did on top of a whole string of other political atrocities by the same team of fakewits, like their total failure to carry out sorely-needed reform of the nation’s tax system, their pig-headed denial of climate-change and consequent resistance to renewable energy, and their refusal to countenance a parliamentary vote on the issue of marriage equality, it might well prove the proverbial straw that breaks the camel’s (kangaroo’s?) back.

As fakewitted as Australia’s conservatives calling themselves “Liberals” can be, however, at least, as in the US, there are strong opponents, vigilant media and independent legal and other institutions to keep them relatively sensible.

Image result for Najib Razak and Razak Baginda

 

But in Malaysia, now in its 60th year of unbroken misrule by UMNO-BN, the system is so fakewitted from top to bottom that even a financial fraud as massive as the 1MDB fiasco appears not to faze the regime, its cronies and supporters.

Nor, as far as I can see, does the fact that last week the decade-old Scorpene submarines scandal resurfaced in the form of a bribery trial in the French courts.

Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak, allegedly a key person of interest, if not a suspect, in both the 1MDB and Scorpene affairs, not to mention the murder of Mongolian translator Altantuya Shaariibuu related to the latter of these, simply continues to blankly deny any involvement.

Meanwhile, Abdul Razak Baginda, originally a defendant in the Scorpene and Altantuya matters, but mysteriously discharged by the court on both counts, claims he has not been charged with bribery by French authorities.

And who in Malaysia is about to call his bluff, if indeed that is what it is? Not the fake police, who are still too busy falsely claiming that they are investigating the 1MDB fraud. Not the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC), which claims it is far too busy with other matters to even look into the recent allegation by Dr Mahathir Mohamad that Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi has unaccountably amassed assets of RM230 million.

In fact the MACC still apparently has not found the time to question Mahathir about how he and at least some of his sons, along with countless other UMNO-BN ministers, members and cronies, prospered so mightily during his 22 years as Prime Minister.

Nor, to my knowledge, have Malaysia’s fake mainstream media ever reported Mahathir’s key role in creating the appalling levels of financial, judicial, electoral, religious and racial fakery and fraud that he now claims to have repented to the extent that he opposes it all. A claim that, as far as I am concerned, anyone who has followed his career would have to be either an incurable optimist or a total fakewit to believe.

Think critically to make sense of Politics in Era of Fake News


August 5, 2017

Think critically to make sense of Politics in Era of Fake News

 

by Dean Johns

http://www.malaysiakini.com

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As I doubt you have any particular cause to recall, in my previous column  I tried to argue for the crying need for us all to cultivate our critical thinking skills to better equip us to rationally resist the tsunami of fake news and views with which ruling regimes continually contrive to swamp our minds.

But I then went on to express the reservation that rationality appears to be powerless against the ‘passionately-expressed but patently false emotings of US President Donald Trump, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak or any of his mendacious paid mouthpieces, or the ravings of any of the world’s countless other misleaders.’

Or, in other words, as I went on to extend this thought ‘the very idea of dealing rationally with the verbal vomit such people constantly spew forth, and that their venal, vapid or utterly vacant supporters so eagerly lap-up, seems ridiculous to me.’

Such was the apparent lack of interest in this or anything else I had to say in the column that it drew only two comments. But, to my surprise and delight, both vividly illustrated the points I was at such pains to make.

In one comment, ‘The Analyser’, a critic of Malaysiakini articles and columns so ubiquitous and  anti-Opposition that many readers rightly or wrongly consider her to be an UMNO-BN stooge, seemed to largely agree with my first point.

Political philosophy 

‘Thank you for all the philosophising, but I think I’ll stick with the facts,’ she typically sarcastically wrote, but then, completely ignoring the question as to what these alleged ‘facts’ might be, went on to concede that ‘a tiny bit of political philosophy in Malaysia would go a long way to squashing the existing ideology of selfishness and greed.’

But The Analyser’s somewhat surprising support of my argument in favour of rational argument based on critical thinking was totally blown away by the only other comment on my column, which was a tour-de-force demonstration of why I have doubts that reason can ever prevail over unreason.

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Some regular Malaysiakini reader and commentator posing as a cigar-chomping ‘Tony Soprano’ provided as compelling proof of philosopher David Hume’s proposition that passion can trump reason as even the current US President or Malaysian Prime Minister or any of such peoples’ spokespersons could be capable of.

Not that I have the slightest intention of, or feel I have any justification for, attacking ‘Tony Soprano’ personally, you understand.

In fact quite the opposite, if anything, considering that all the comments I’ve read that he’s made at Malaysiakini in the past have left me with the impression that he’s as disgusted with the UMNO-BN regime as I am, and thus, at least on the proverbial ‘my enemy’s enemy’ principle, a friend.

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But unfortunately, my attempts at a rational argument against the possibility of Trump’s ever realising his incessantly-trumpeted intention to ‘make America great again’ appear to have turned ‘Tony’ from friend to friend.

Reason-killing rage

Or, more specifically, by mentioning just a few of the recent and current apparent lapses from greatness on the part of the US, I’ve so offended his sense of patriotism as to provoke him to reason-killing rage or what the shrinks call an ‘Amygdala rush’.

Here, to save you the trouble of looking it up from a week back, is how this ‘Tony Soprano’ hissy-fit went, with my own brief notes in square brackets:

“Another America-bashing Commonwealth citizen who’s undoubtedly not spent any time in the US [False] It is a great country [Any evidence at all?]; making it great ‘again’ is merely another misleading Trumpian slogan.

“Two-thirds of the gun deaths are either accidents or suicides [But still deaths, right?] Meanwhile violent crime has been declining drastically since 1993. I live in a very safe and friendly city of 500,000 [Bully for you. But your point is?] Trump is Trump and wasn’t even elected by absolute votes [Just like Najib, in fact, in GE13].

“In case you’re not aware [as if anyone could not be], the checks and balances are closing around him [S-l-o-w-l-y]. As for the Vietnam War, you can go back in history as far as you want. [Not very far, is it? With one of its chief war criminals, the mad bomber of Laos and Cambodia, Henry Kissinger, still alive? Or is the US re-writing its history Malaysia-style?]

“China annexed Tibet in 1950. China murdered millions of its own citizens even up to 1989. Many of her prisoners are POLITICAL [Yes, but what on earth does this have to do with the alleged greatness of America?]. How could you be so epistemologically immature [???] as to miss that point?

“Australia is notorious for its outrageous treatment of boat people and other refugees. [True. In fact, for this and many other reasons, I loathe Australia’s current government almost as much as America’s] Indian students were afraid to apply to your universities due to a spate of violent attacks. [Fake news. It was only in Melbourne, and the attacks were on employees of 711 stores, most of whom happened to be Indian]. You forgot to mention all that.’

As I’m sure you clearly see without even reading my comments on it, far from removing or disproving any doubts that America is ‘great’, whatever that supposedly means, this ‘Tony Soprano’ diatribe, like similarly irrational ‘arguments’ in favour of Malaysia’s UMNO-BN and sundry other false and crooked regimes, only serves to support my thesis that fakery, finger-pointing, and other passionately-employed propaganda techniques can be highly confusing and even convincing.

Or, in short, as everybody knows and I’ve endlessly repeated previously, bullshit has a way of baffling brains. And the fact that today we’re apparently faced with more phony facts, fake news and views and other forms of bullshit than ever before is the most compelling possible case for us citizens to all think as critically as we can.