IMF on Malaysia–Report Card


May 3, 2017

International Monetary Fund on Malaysia–Report Card

by The International Monetary Fund

Image result for putrajaya malaysia

Putrajaya–The Administrative Capital of Malaysia

The IMF conducts an Annual Review of member country economic situation. At the conclusion of the consultations the Executive Board considers the findings which are also conveyed to the Government. A Press Release is issued  together with access to the full staff report on the Fund’s website. The Report  is in the nature of a “Report Card”.

The text of the Press Release is reproduced below. The full report can be accessed and downloaded from  ::

http://www.imf.org/en/Publications/CR/Issues/2017/04/28/Malaysia-2017-Article-IV-Consultation-Press-Release-Staff-Report-and-Statement-by-the-44869

On March 15, 2017, the Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) concluded the Article IV consultation1 with Malaysia.

Despite a challenging global economic environment, the Malaysian economy performed well over the past few years. Notwithstanding the impact of the global commodity price and financial markets volatility, the economy remained resilient, owing to a diversified production and export base; strong balance sheet positions; a flexible exchange rate; responsive macroeconomic policies; and deep financial markets. While real GDP growth slowed down, Malaysia is still among the fastest growing economies among peers. The challenging global macroeconomic and financial environment puts premium on continued diligence and requires careful calibration of policies going forward.

Risks to the outlook are tilted to the downside, originating from both external and domestic sources. External risks include structurally weak growth in advanced and emerging market economies and retreat from cross-border integration. Although the Malaysian economy has adjusted well to lower global oil prices, sustained low commodity prices would add to the challenge of achieving medium-term fiscal targets. Heightened global financial stress and associated capital flows could affect the economy.

Domestic risks are primarily related to public sector and household debt, along with pockets of vulnerabilities in the corporate sector. Federal debt and contingent liabilities are relatively high, limiting policy space to respond to shocks. Although the household debt-to-GDP ratio is likely to decline, household debt also remains high, with debt servicing capacity growing only moderately.

Real GDP growth rate is expected to increase moderately to 4.5 percent year-on-year (y/y) in 2017 from 4.2 percent in 2016. Domestic demand, led by private consumption, continue to be the main driver of growth, while a drag from net exports, similar to 2016, will remain.

Consumer price inflation is projected to rise and average 2.7 percent y/y in 2017 on the back of higher global oil prices and the rationalization of subsidies on cooking oil. The current account surplus would be largely unchanged as impacts from an improved global outlook and higher commodity prices would be offset by the strength of imports on the back of a resilient domestic demand.

Image result for Bank Negara Malaysia

Bank Negara Malaysia—in full control of the Pulse of the Malaysian Economy

Executive Directors commended the resilience of the Malaysian economy, which reflects sound macroeconomic policy responses in the face of significant headwinds and risks. While Malaysia’s economic growth is expected to continue in 2017, weaker-than-expected growth in key advanced and emerging economies or a global retreat from cross-border integration could weigh on the domestic economy. Against this background, Directors urged vigilance and continued efforts to strengthen policy buffers and boost long-term economic growth.

Directors agreed that the authorities’ medium-term fiscal policy is well anchored on achieving a near-balanced federal budget by 2020. The planned consolidation will help alleviate risks from elevated government debt levels and contingent liabilities and build fiscal space for future expansionary policy, as needed.

Directors recommended that the pace of consolidation reflect economic conditions and that any counter-cyclical fiscal policy measures be well-targeted and temporary. They noted that improvements to the fiscal framework, such as elaborating medium term projections and preparing and publishing an annual fiscal risks statement, would help anchor medium-term fiscal adjustment and mitigate risks.

Directors agreed that the current monetary policy stance is appropriate. Going forward, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) should continue to carefully calibrate monetary policy to support growth while being mindful of financial conditions.

Directors emphasized that global financial market conditions could affect the monetary policy space and should be carefully monitored.

Directors noted that the banking sector is sound overall and that financial sector risks appear contained. Nonetheless, they cautioned that potential pockets of vulnerability should be closely monitored. They noted that household debt remains relatively high, while in the corporate sector, there are emerging vulnerabilities in some sectors. Directors suggested that macroprudential measures be adjusted if needed.

Directors underscored the central role of macroeconomic policy and exchange rate flexibility in helping the economy adjust to external shocks. In this regard, they welcomed the authorities’ commitment to keeping the exchange rate as the key shock absorber. They recommended that reserves be accumulated as opportunities arise and deployed in the event of disorderly market conditions. Noting the authorities’ aim to improve the functioning of the onshore forward foreign exchange market, Directors urged the BNM to monitor the effects of the recent measures introduced in this regard, recognizing their benefits and costs.

They emphasized that close consultation and communication by BNM (Bank Negara Malaysia–Central Bank) with market participants will be essential in further developing the foreign exchange market and bolstering resilience.

Directors underscored that steadfast implementation of the authorities’ ambitious structural reform agenda is key to boosting long-term economic potential. They supported the emphasis on increasing female labor force participation, improving the quality of education, lowering skills mismatch, boosting productivity growth, encouraging research and innovation, and upholding high standards of governance.

At the conclusion of the discussion, the Managing Director, as Chairman of the Board, summarizes the views of Executive Directors, and this summary is transmitted to the country’s authorities. An explanation of any qualifiers used in summings up can be found here: http://www.imf.org/external/np/sec/misc/qualifiers.htm.

3 thoughts on “IMF on Malaysia–Report Card

    • Famous for the “IMF Riots” i.e. riots after the IMF forces
      weak Third World nations to undergo “structural adjustment” programmes such as cutting subsidies for food and fuel.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s