China’s Advice–Pursue the path of mutually beneficial cooperation for regional peace and stability


January 12, 2017

China issues urges small and medium-sized countries to pursue the path of  mutually beneficial cooperation for regional peace and stability

Image result for China the SuperpowerChina–Exercising Soft Power in Asia

by Channel News Asia

SINGAPORE: China on Wednesday (Jan 11) issued its first white paper on issues related to Asia-Pacific security cooperation.

In the six-point proposal, reproduced in full by Xinhua, Beijing stated that “small- and medium-sized countries need not and should not take sides among big countries”.

“All countries should make joint efforts to pursue a new path of dialogue instead of confrontation and pursue partnerships rather than alliances, and build an Asia-Pacific partnership featuring mutual trust, inclusiveness and mutually beneficial cooperation,” the white paper read.

It added that China would step up its role in regional and global security to take on greater responsibilities. “China is ready to pursue security through dialogue and cooperation in the spirit of working together for mutually beneficial results, and safeguard peace and stability jointly with other countries in the region.”

Image result for China the Superpower and the South China Sea

“The realities of geography, military and vast economic power yield China essentially permanent advantages over its near neighbors. They are always going to live in the shadow of China, and their economies will continue to be become more closely integrated with China’s. China’s neighbors will always need Beijing more that it needs them. This leverage means that over the long term, whether control is centralized or not, China’s strategic approach to maritime issues will leave little room for compromise.”http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/the-real-south-china-sea-problem-the-shadow-china-12015–

China remains committed to “upholding peace and stability in the South China Sea” and will continue to maintain dialogue on the issue with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), it said.

However, Beijing also warned that it could be forced to issue “necessary responses to the provocative actions which infringe on China’s territorial sovereignty and maritime rights and interests, and undermine peace and stability in the South China Sea”.

It added that no effort “to internationalise and judicialise” the South China Sea issue “will be of avail”.

The paper concluded that China’s development would add to “the momentum for world peace”.In a news conference to explain the white paper, Vice Foreign Minister Liu Zhenmin said it proposes to strengthen cooperation by promoting common development, perfecting existing regional multilateral mechanisms, promoting rule setting, intensifying military exchanges and cooperation, and properly resolving divergences and disputes.

“We hope that all countries in the region will work along with China to uphold win-win cooperation and make joint efforts in achieving long-lasting peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region,” he said.

 

 

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/china-issues-white-paper-warns-small-and-medium-sized-countries/3430786.html

7 thoughts on “China’s Advice–Pursue the path of mutually beneficial cooperation for regional peace and stability

  1. Quote:- “…All countries should make joint efforts to pursue a new path of dialogue instead of confrontation…”

    …and the best way to achieve this is to take a map of your immediate neighborhood, the older the better, draw nine dash lines on it and proclaim that everything inside them belongs to your great, great, great grandfather and therefore now belongs to you and your posterity forever more.

  2. In the recent couple of years I have read many position papers from Chinese strategist scholars arguing that China was too focused with the American’s instigation in the South China Sea and neglected the critical regional players – the ASEAN countries; that China needs to consider ASEAN members’ concerns in regional affairs; that ASEAN countries and China should focus on how to thrive jointly, not confronting each other, and as long as ASEAN members can see tangible benefits from their relations with China, the US will have fewer chances to make waves in the region. Perhaps this White Paper is the result of it.

    The quoted passage by Michael McDevitt from the National Interest that Din inserted to the above article makes a lot of sense. Given the geography and the fact of a rising China, ASEAN will “always going to live in the shadow of China, and their economies will continue to be become more closely integrated with China’s.” History has told us China co-existed with its ASEAN neighbors, except Vietnam, peacefully for thousand of years until the Western colonialists came.

    Vietnam will continue to become the headache for China. India is stirring up troubles in the South China Sea by selling missiles to Vietnam to be installed in their man-made islands. China has warned they won’t sit with their arms crossed if India sells missiles to Vietnam. I believe this America-India’s pipe dream policy of using Vietnam to contain China will fall apart soon after China completed building the new deep-water port on a 90-kilometer stretch of Cambodia’s coastline, just a few hundred kilometers from disputed territories in the South China Sea.

  3. My take for Sustained Peace, Prosperity and Security in Asia- Pacific and Elsewhere,has been for some time:

    Promote and Practise ” SaBoR”, with Sincerity.

    “SaBoR”= ” Shared Benefit and of Responsibility “.

  4. A few years ago I gathered there was an interest from a few Singaporeans hoping that the nation could be the latest state to join USA. I wonder if the interest is still there in a Trump world 😛

    It is sad to see this is even floated today…
    https://www.quora.com/Will-anyone-support-Singapore-joining-China-as-a-special-administration-region-like-HK-Macau

    But, it is interesting to read the response. It still seems to be a resounding ‘No’.

    Technically, that is one other way to resolve the coastline dispute.

    I wonder how layu-layu thinks on this subject matter, considering what 1PM’s public stand on this matter.

  5. @LaMoy: Today is a gift we called ‘Present’. As such, it does the Chinese authority well to learn about the other strategic papers you have read. I sure wish more SEAS leaders would read enough to quote those papers as they see another possible China with whom they could grow prosperously together.

    Haijin in the past didn’t come out of thin air. Issues Chinese faces with all of their immediate neighbors didn’t pop out today because all of their neighbors have suddenly decided to gang up on Chinese. A lot has to do with their own internal power struggle.

    Given how difficult life continues to be for everyone living in the smog, no one who is deemed to be opposing China voiced their concerns out of jealousy, or disrespect.

    For some pendatang Chinese (no matter if we are of Hakka, or Hokkien descent), we have always called ourselves Chinese with an adjective. Myself, specifically, Hakka. I see wisdom in that, in spite of much havoc we Hakka have created, especially the immediate work that led to today’s post-imperialist China, for the good or for the worse.

  6. There is a huge fat boy who asked me out for dinner and told me I will pay and he will eat, if not, I will get a beating and he will take away my bicycle. Of course as long as I obliged to his request, he is a non violent, peace loving, harmless boy.

  7. //There is a huge fat boy who asked me out for dinner and told me I will pay and he will eat, if not, I will get a beating and he will take away my bicycle.

    In all fairness, the above is not true. That is not the case with Xi-core’s intention and dealings with Malaysia.

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