A Trump Presidency possible: Preparing for Donald J. Trump

September 24, 2016

A Trump Presidency possible: Preparing for Donald J. Trump

Embassies that once assumed Clinton would win struggle to know what to expect from her rival

Image result for donald trump the next president of the united states

The End of Obama’s Neo-Liberalism–It was good while it lasted

Donald Trump’s September surge in the polls has set off alarm bells in capitals across Europe and Asia that are ill-prepared for a Republican victory in November.

Although he was barely present in New York this week as world leaders descended on the UN, the Republican candidate was a constant theme of conversation on the sidelines of this year’s General Assembly.

“Everyone is freaking out that he might actually win,” said one senior European official in New York this week. “It would make Brexit seem easy to deal with.”

Many governments in Europe, Asia and Latin America have been openly critical of some of Mr Trump’s foreign policy positions, with French president François Hollande going so far as to say last month that the Republican nominee “makes you want to retch”.

However, until recently they were working under the assumption that Hillary Clinton would win comfortably in the autumn. Now, with Mrs Clinton holding a lead of little over two points in the polls, they suddenly find themselves having to adjust to a very different election, where a Trump victory is at least a possibility.

“Until recently, the main question we were asking was what sort of impact the election rhetoric would have on a Clinton administration, in terms of trade deals, military intervention and so on. But the polls are telling us we have to at least seriously entertain the idea that he has a chance to win,” said one Australian official.

Image result for Can we trust Hillary Clinton

My Answer: Why not? She is no different from Mr Trump. It’s Politics–Din Merican

If Mr Trump’s views on Russia have been the most controversial aspect of his foreign policy approach in the US, in Europe and Asia it is his scathing criticism of traditional alliances that has garnered the most attention. At various stages in the campaign, the Republican candidate has suggested the US might not defend NATO allies and has said Washington should spend much less on defending Japan and South Korea.

Diplomats in Washington say that in the run-up to the Republican convention in July, representatives from the Trump campaign, including co-chairman Sam Clovis and then campaign manager Paul Manafort, told them that Mr Trump’s statements about America’s allies were less policy proposals and more opening statements in a negotiation.

In recent weeks, however, embassies in Washington have been receiving instructions to get a more precise understanding of the priorities of a Trump White House and who would be the senior officials in the administration.

“We have been told we need much more detailed planning about what a Trump administration would mean, the specific policies we should expect and who the key players would be,” said one Asian official. “But even at this stage, this is almost impossible to say.”

One of the complications in this election for foreign governments has been the rift between Mr Trump and large parts of the Republican foreign policy establishment, a section of which is openly supporting Hillary Clinton. Most of the small group of foreign policy advisers currently working with Mr Trump are much less well-known, giving diplomats in Washington little insight into the campaign’s thinking.

Mr Trump did receive some praise from the one leader who he met this week in New York, Egyptian president Abdel Fatah al-Sisi, who said the Republican candidate would “no doubt” make a strong leader. Asked about Mr Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims entering the US, Mr al-Sisi said that “during election campaigns many statements are made and many things are said; however, afterwards, governing the country would be something different.”

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair warned on Tuesday about the consequences of the US pulling back from its global role in ways that Mr Trump has often proposed.

“Can you imagine the soccer game where the referee decides to go back in the changing room? The first few moments, everyone says that’s great, and they’re away. After a time, it’s chaos,” Mr Blair told a Reuters event in New York. He added that Mrs Clinton was someone of “enormous wisdom, common sense and integrity.”

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang took the diplomatic route. “No matter who gets elected, I believe China-US ties will grow steadily and in a positive direction,” he told the Economic Club of New York.

8 thoughts on “A Trump Presidency possible: Preparing for Donald J. Trump

  1. Vested interest is strong and Trump will be defeated in the Electoral College. But the US will never be the same because those who come after him in the GOP will only be able to get to the front by taking up what those in the middle class need. In this regard the continued low interest rate environment is not in the interest of this group because many of us with small savings hope that the interest we earn from the fixed deposits will help us to meet those unexpected expenses during theyear. Always remember that that can be no viable democracy if the middle class is being constantly pushed to join the under-class.

  2. Republican for US president surely pakistan will get roasted, china will get BBQed. north korea will evaporate, japan will have it’s own military and aircraft carriers. India and australia become new police for asia pacific. Asean work 24/365 days to stay alive.

  3. There were those in the 1930s who said that Hitler was just bluffing, until he took power and then proceeded to carry out exactly what he wrote in Mein Kampf e.g. lebensraum.

    Similarly, there are those who say Trump is just bluffing.
    Just read his writings and look at his past actions (including
    his questionable business deals). This is a picture of things to come if he ever becomes the President of the USA.

  4. This has to ring a bell with the American electorate except the bigots. It’s like Obama saying unless you are an Orang Asli, everyone else in Malaysia is a Pendatang! Spot on!

  5. Regardless of whoever eventually assumes the presidency, the one question that is always profound is, “Whose interests does the presidency serve?”.

  6. You can trust Clinton with managing US finances but not with women;
    You can trust HRC with Bill Clinton but not the US presidency.

  7. Pingback: Superthrive Australian Elections Polls 2016 Republican | Purathrive reviews

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