Tawfik Ismail: Malaysian Leaders can make documents disappear


February 17, 2016

by Julia Yeow, News Editor

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com

Din Merican @UC

COMMENT: Some years ago when we were at the ISEAS (now renamed ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute) for an intellectual sparring session on Malaysian politics at the kind invitation of the then ISEAS Executive Director, Ambassador K. Kesavapany, Tawfik told me that he had handed over all Tun Dr. Ismail’s private papers to ISEAS for safekeeping.He added that the Singaporeans had a sense of history and had better facilities for preservation and protection of documents and records. Of course, he was being polite.

Actually, he did not trust our authorities. Apart from sheer incompetence, our national archives, for example, can be persuaded to make documents and records disappear without any trace.

Looking back, I think Tawfik made a wise decision. If Altantuya’s entry record could disappear from the Immigration Department, what else can our authorities not do. Malaysia, semua boleh (everything can).–Din Merican

Tawfik, you are right, we cannot trust our Malaysian Leaders.

Drifting into Politics is a collection of letters and notes by the late Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman, which he had meant to be compiled into an autobiography, but he died before he could finish it. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, February 17, 2016.

Drifting into Politics is a collection of letters and notes by the late Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman, which he had meant to be compiled into an autobiography, but he died before he could finish it. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, February 17, 2016.

Tun Dr Imail Bin Abdul Rahman on NEW ECONOMIC POLICY

“My father saw NEP as a game of golf. You need a handicap to let people catch up, but after that, you have to do away with the handicap.He was a sportsman, so he understood it well…

…Mahathir was not a sportsman. He doesn’t understand what a handicap is. He thinks that handicaps are meant to be forev er.He thinks the Malays are meant to be dependent on the party and the system forever. But we, the Malays, need to break out of that thinking, to find a new paradigm, to remake history.”–Tawfik Ismail

Fearing incompetence and censorship, the son of the late Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman said he handed over his father’s private documents to a Singapore-based think-tank for safekeeping.

Tawfik Ismail said he was confident that the personal and candid writings by his father, the Deputy Prime Minister from 1970 to 1973, about his policies and his experiences with other leaders while in office, would have been deemed too “sensitive and revealing” for Malaysian authorities.

“I handed my father’s private documents to (ISEAS) Institute of Southeast Asian Studies ( remaned ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute) in 2004, and was seen to have acted against the interest of the country,” Tawfik told a small but packed room of historians and political analysts at the official launch of Tun Dr Ismail’s unfinished autobiography in Singapore on Monday.

“The reason I did it was that I don’t think our National Archives are up to the task of preserving these documents. There is a policy deficiency,” he said.

“The government can also stamp anything under the Official Secrets Act (OSA), and it’ll never see the time of day.”

Under OSA the government can prohibit the dissemination of any information that is classified as an official secret.

“Ironically, even though Singapore is seen as a more iron-fisted government, it did a better job of preserving Malaysian archives than Malaysia would have,” he said.

Tawfik said his earlier experience of tracking down recordings of his father’s speeches had left him frustrated and disappointed.

“My father delivered a speech in University Sains Malaysia in 1973, and it embodied his vision for the nation. It’s a very important speech and I asked the National Archives department if they had a recording of it and they said ‘no’.

“Then I asked USM if they kept any recording of it, and the answer was also ‘no’. Unfortunately, that’s the state of history-keeping in Malaysia, which is really a pity,” he said.

Tawfik Ismail says his experience of tracking down recordings of his father’s speeches left him frustrated and disappointed, and decided to send a collection of his father's writings to Singapore for safekeeping. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, February 17, 2016.

Tawfik Ismail says his experience of tracking down recordings of his father’s speeches left him frustrated and disappointed, and decided to send a collection of his father’s writings to Singapore for safekeeping. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, February 17, 2016.

The book “Drifting into Politics: The Unfinished Memoirs of Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman” is a collection of personal letters and notes written by the former leader which were meant to be compiled into an autobiography.

However, the work was never finished as Tun Dr Ismail died suddenly of a heart attack in 1973.

ISEAS had also published two earlier books about Tun Dr Ismail, drawing from the private documents in their possession, but the launch of the memoir was seen to be the “most timely” in the backdrop of what many in Malaysia see as a leadership crisis.

“The book is about leadership; consistent and principled leadership. It’s a topic that weighs heavily on many Malaysians today,” said co-author and ISEAS Deputy Director, Dr. Ooi Kee Beng.

Tawfik said the book highlighted the many missed opportunities in Malaysia, but said the country was not beyond redemption.

“There are people in politics now who are principled, but because of the way UMNO is set up, they won’t be able to rise to the top.

“Because of the way UMNO is, this kind of leaders cannot emerge. That’s why a lot of the best and brightest are out in the opposition.”

Tawfik said his father would have been “very disappointed” by the state of the nation today, citing racial divisions, use of religion to control the majority Malays, and the continued use of the New Economic Policy, as some of the main issues that went against what Tun Dr Ismail believed in.

Tun Dr Ismail was instrumental in formulating the New Economic Policy (NEP) after the ethnic riots erupted in Kuala Lumpur on May 13, 1969.

Tawfik said NEP was meant to address the assumed root cause of the violence – unequal distribution of wealth and social inequality among the races. But he insisted his late father had never meant for the policy to continue indefinitely.

“My father saw NEP as a game of golf. You need a handicap to let people catch up, but after that, you have to do away with the handicap.He was a sportsman, so he understood it well.”

He said former Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, on the other hand, had very different views on the weakness of the Malay race and their need for long term assistance.

“Mahathir was not a sportsman. He doesn’t understand what a handicap is. He thinks that handicaps are meant to be forever.He thinks the Malays are meant to be dependent on the party and the system forever,” said Tawfik.

“But we, the Malays, need to break out of that thinking, to find a new paradigm, to remake history.”

 

6 thoughts on “Tawfik Ismail: Malaysian Leaders can make documents disappear

  1. As a young boy, I knew Tun Ismail’s colleagues and as much as they want to bury the truth about this country founding and history, most of the truth is still out there. The problem remain UMNO do not want the truth and the Malays don’t care for it either. It is not going to change unless they want it and the only way it will happen when.most have to pay for not wanting it.

  2. Hang Tuah and friends and many others can be written out of Malaysian history … many things can happen in Malaysia. Don’t be surprised if they put the current PM on a pedestal far higher than his father and any other past leaders of Malaysia and claim he is a god-send and best thing that ever happened to the country ….

  3. To remake history, Malays simply have to be patriotic and remember the Malaysian Motto, Berseketu Bertamba Mutu. That steps are simple, vote out the thieves and murderers from our government. Take out the characterization of Bangsa, and bury that word Cina Babi, Keling, Bangsat, etc., maintain a secular nation and allow equal educational opportunities. We have a great start but absent of the Cambodian experience, it will take one generation to weed out all the bigots that have been cultured in the last fifty years from BTN. But these steps will never happen until the day the government is completely broke from the continuous corrupt practice of wholesale looting of the Malaysian Treasury. Whether we like it or not, our hope remains in Sungai Buloh, and only Mat Sabu been willing to throw things to get some attention of the national level of cowardice.

  4. Thats how Bolehland lost Batu Putih. The folks down south kept all the relevant documents. Bolehland depended on doctored google maps to try to cheat the Tribunal at the Hague.

    Now, such levels of cheating and lying is a specialization not many countries can match. See how far it has gotten the elite in the country. Even the Saudis are happy to donate to such endeavors.

  5. ‘NEP like Golf’..During my schooling days, we malay singaporean did not have to pay school fee but the rest of the other race had to. Now, all student have to pay their school fees which is affordable. If anyone can’t afford to, they can turn to their respective race association which is supported by the government for ready help. The malay singaporean is indeed playing at a level field and proud of it.
    _________________
    Halim,

    You should be proud that Singapore Malays did not have NEP (Handicapping system abused by UMNO). You had Mendaki and dignity (maruah). You never accepted that your community was in anyway handicapped and had,therefore, to rely on handouts. I was in Singapore in 1988-1991 as Managing Director, Sime Darby Singapore Limited, and got to know some Malay PAP leaders like Ahmad Mattar, Zainul Rasheed, Sidek Saniff, and Abdullah Tarmugi who were involved in Mendaki. I congratulate you and Singapore Malays. –Din Merican

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