Najib Razak- A Disastrous Prime Minister for Malaysia.


January 29, 2016

Najib Razak- A Disastrous Prime Minister for Malaysia.

by The Financial Times

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/70219cfe-c4f9-11e5-b3b1-7b2481276e45.html#axzz3yZXBpn7s

Malaysia’s ruling elite should realise that they stand at a critical juncture. Many may wish for a more accomplished leader, but the problem runs deeper than personalities. UMNO needs to rule equally and democratically on behalf of all Malaysians…In particular, the practice of providing political patronage to a group of crony Malay business people, which underpins the opacity and favouritism among the UMNO elite, needs to be brought to an end.–The Financial Times

 

Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak (C) reacts as he leaving after attending a parliament session in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 26 January 2016©EPA

What Manner of Man is this Malaysian Prime Minister-A National Disgrace

Events this week have done nothing to dispel a growing sense that Najib Razak has been a disastrous Prime Minister for Malaysia. Just 24 hours after the country’s Attorney-General found that Mr Najib had no case to answer over a $680m sum paid into his personal bank account, the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission announced it would seek a review of this ruling.

Separately, it emerged that Tim Leissner, a senior Goldman Sachs banker and the driving force behind deals with a troubled Malaysian state investment fund, had taken “personal leave” and returned to the US.

Mr Najib and 1MDB, the state fund with which Goldman Sachs worked, deny they are guilty of any crimes.But the web of allegations and investigations swirling around the prime minister and his affairs are damaging Malaysia’s international reputation and deepening a public trust deficit at home.

The issue is not just that many Malaysians are dissatisfied with the attorney-general’s statement that there was “no reason given” for the $680m transfer to Mr Najib from the Saudi Royal Family. It is also Mr Najib’s attitude towards the issue, which he said this week had been an “unnecessary distraction for the country”.

Far from being a distraction, the questions raised by the transfer and the dealings of 1MDB are pivotal to Malaysia’s future. At stake is whether one of Southeast Asia’s leading nations, and a strategic ally of the US and European powers in the region, can maintain its equilibrium as a prosperous, free-market democracy that blends an adherence to moderate Islam with an internationally recognised legal system.

Without a clear accounting of what transpired between Mr Najib and 1MDB, Kuala Lumpur risks reinforcing an impression that its democracy is being shredded by a self-serving Malay elite. Mr Najib is already vulnerable to such charges. The treatment of Anwar Ibrahim, an opposition leader jailed after he nearly defeated Mr Najib in 2013 elections, has been widely condemned, most recently by a UN human rights group which called his detention “illegal”. The Prime Minister has also muzzled critics within the ruling party and dismissed Abdul Gani Patail, the former Attorney-General who led corruption inquiries into his affairs.

This lurch towards authoritarianism is unsettling investors in Malaysian stocks and bonds while applying extra pressure to the ringgit currency. But a more acute sense of alienation is nursed by the country’s ethnic Chinese and Indian minorities, who make up more than one-third of the 29m population.

najib duit

Long disenfranchised by the fact that UMNO, the ruling party, stipulates that its members must adhere to Islam, the Chinese and Indian minorities have grown increasingly vocal in their dissatisfaction and are swelling a “brain drain” overseas. UMNO’s response — to growing signs of disaffection among young urban Malays — has been to shore up support among its rural Malay bedrock by emphasising its Islamic credentials, further alienating non-Muslims who worry over a growing prominence given to sharia law.

Malaysia’s ruling elite should realise that they stand at a critical juncture. Many may wish for a more accomplished leader, but the problem runs deeper than personalities. UMNO needs to rule equally and democratically on behalf of all Malaysians.

In particular, the practice of providing political patronage to a group of crony Malay business people, which underpins the opacity and favouritism among the UMNO elite, needs to be brought to an end.

15 thoughts on “Najib Razak- A Disastrous Prime Minister for Malaysia.

  1. Yes indeed. This politician is a disgrace and a disaster. He has violated all the laws in Malaysia, but the idiotic Apandi, the Attorney-General has the cheek to say this daylight robber has no case to answer. Surely, he cannot be above the law. Hey, this is Malaysia run by a bunch of UMNO kleptocrats who have no regard for the Rule of Law.We are an exceptional nation, where the ruling elite acts with impunity.

    The MACC has asked for a judicial review and let us hope our Judiciary will do what is right for the country, although I have lost my respect for our judges. Now is the opportunity for the Head of the Judiciary to prove that people like me and others are wrong.–Din Merican

    P.S. where is Tunku Abdul Aziz, the anti-corruption campaigner and former DAP Vice Chairman and Senator turned Najib’s sycophant?

  2. FT should add that Chinese and Indians are not the ones who are suffering the most. Bumiputeras, other than those living in Putra Jaya, living in the regions with the most voting rights have been the ones who have lost the most. The answer is simple, they have been disenfranchised, like the “squatter” natives who have been losing their land, and those grew up in felda land who have their livelihood lelong away with the second biggest IPO in the world then, after Facebook.

  3. Correction: UMNO kleptocrats plus kleptocrats from other “lap dog” BN component parties.

    Ferdinand Marcos, Mobutu Sese Seko, Hosni Mubarak, Robert Mugabe,
    Baby Doc Duvalier, Zine Ben Ali, Teodoro Obiang, Jean Bokassa, Suharto ……… examples of extreme misgovernance in Third World countries.

    But there is still hope. We can see the progress made under the rule of
    Evo Morales in Bolivia, Rafael Correa in Ecuador and Lula da Silva in Brazil. Nearer home – Singapore, and Philippines under Benigno Aquino III.
    Then there are other well-governed and democratic Third World countries such as Mauritius, Cape Verde, Botswana.

  4. The ones who suffer the most happen to be the bedrock of Umno support – the rural Malays. With the ongoing Umno leadership tussle in Kedah and the prevailing uncertainty the poor Malays in Pak Din’s neck of the wood are very much affected. Hopefully, these so-called blind supporters of Umno would come to their senses and realise their folly before it’s too late.

    Jibby, the people don’t want a thief running the country. Remember this – you can fool the rakyat once or twice but you can’t fool them all the time!

  5. The AG is right is saying Najib the PM is innocent and does not know where the funds came from. The funds came from Najib the Finance Minister who is his evil triplet. The approval was given by Najib the Chairman of 1MDB and thus again Najib the PM is not aware of funds hitting his bank account. In all there’s 3 Najibs here and Najib the PM is clean. Go after Najib the Finance Minister and Najib the Chairman of 1MDB.

  6. Sir.
    Just like you, I have lost my respect for the judiciary. About 40 years ago we had brilliant judges all ‘london mari’. I remember the Ong brothers, Eussofe Cadeer, SS Gill and their learned brothers. Now we have what? Now we have judges who cannot differentiate between has and have. Good lawyers shun the bench because they’ll be in the minority. Judges are no longer dedicated to the law. They are more interested in politics. We had well known judges like Tun Azmi, Tun Suffian and Ali Hassan. They were all interested in nothing but dispensing justice. It was educational to read their judgements.

  7. No doubt about it.

    Najib is the most incompetent Prime Minister in Malaysia’s history.

    Najib is also the most corrupt Prime Minister in Malaysia’s history.

  8. It’s hard to digest what AG, the Pandi said in his verdict on this nation’s premier scandal on Najib who has become the laughing stock in the eyes of the world.

    There are laws to guide to decide on any case, be it PM or otherwise. Does the constitution say the AG could charge as he liked to his whims and fancies without even giving reasons for his clearance on very core issues on corruption of the century deemed to be straight forward.

    Soon after clearing Najib, this Pandi left the country to an unknown destination. The same with the CJ soon after Anwar’s Federal Court decision left the country also without any announcement. Well, only God knows of their actions and deeds in the “wonderland of Alladdin” after their task had been performed to their absolute discretion, even calling black is and white is black white using their discretionary powers because they are to show their loyalty to their masters who appointed them. To the greedy, there is moral value in their decisions. Absurdity is at its abyss to make the country rot.

    Faithful dogs seem to run the country when they interpret laws, one to their masters and another to the layman.

  9. Disgrace? Reputation? We have a country run by POWER, not law – that is CHAOS.. Worst that power is not derived not by any sort personal merit, performance BUT by money and abuse of the state. It is not sustainable..It is the start of collapse of the state – lawlessness.

  10. corrigenundum to my earlier posting.

    > ‘even calling black is white and white is black’
    > ‘to the greedy, there is no moral value in their decisions’

  11. Tok Cik, you are very wrong. In Bolehland, you fool the people all the time and till the end of time. Mark my words, Jibro will be around for a long, long time.

  12. We have wronged Jibby. It is indeed donation from a dead king from a faraway kingdom. And indeed, he did return the leftover USD620m. However, he is unable to provide any transaction receipt of the return. He burned the monies as offering. Excerpt from – Hikayat Dongeng Negara.

  13. @Bukit Sentosa Yes, we have wronged 1PM. As per AG, PM Najib does not that even know the money is supposed to be transferred into his account. That is ~0.2% GDP growth in one shot. The late Sultan has left us. Why did our 1PM return so much money, and so quickly! Saudi Kingdom is not even aware of that, and didn’t ask for the money back. Given so many people didn’t know about it, why did PM Najib want to return it? The nation has a lot of use for that money.

  14. Some things I don’t understand:

    > allegations and investigations swirling around the prime minister and his affairs are damaging Malaysia’s international reputation…At stake is whether one of Southeast Asia’s leading nations, and a strategic ally of the US and European powers in the regioncan maintain its equilibrium as a prosperous, free-market democracyKuala Lumpur risks reinforcing an impression that its democracy is being shredded by a self-serving Malay elite. <

    I’ll stop here: despite words such as “deepening” trust deficit and “reinforcing” an impression (only an “impression!) the entire article pretends that the whole thing begins and will end with Najib. It did not: it started several administrations earlier, and has always been partly due to the former British colonial strategy of divide and rule.

  15. My above posting has been badly shortened and mauled. Here’s the entire posting again.

    Some things I don’t understand:

    “allegations and investigations swirling around the prime minister and his affairs are damaging Malaysia’s international reputation…”

    Is the article implying that before Najib Malaysia had a good or better international reputation? Further, is it not the case that “international reputation”, like “the community of civilized nations”, often mean, in particular, the extent of Western approval? Anyway, I seem the remember the dirt thrown at Dr M for his decision to stop capital flight during the Asian Financial Crisis, which probably resulted in saving a number of Malaysian companies from being raided and/or bought cheap by foreign corporate predators. The independence-minded Mahathir had long been called “recalcitrant” by certain parties in the West, so it’s hard to prove that what Najib is doing has “damaged” or is “damaging” an already damaged “international reputation.”

    “At stake is whether one of Southeast Asia’s leading nations, and a strategic ally of the US and European powers in the region”

    Here again, I’m puzzled. Ever since the Tun Razak administration, Malaysia used to pride itself as a neutral country (one reason why it refused to join the former defunct SEATO), and never a strategic ally of the West. Has there been a change of policy? Since when has that policy been changed and by which administration?

    “…can maintain its equilibrium as a prosperous, free-market democracy”

    I wonder what a “free-market democracy” really means. Is there such a thing as a “free market?” If there is (hope lies eternal in the human breast), what’s the relationship between a “free market” and “democracy?” Does the expression imply that there are other forms of “free market” like “free market totalitarianism?” Or perhaps “free market theocracy?” Malaysians are proud of the fact that, for example, most thriving local banks were taken away from their former owners – those people who built up their institutions through sweat and tears – through their country’s “blending of an adherence to moderate Islam with an internationally recognised legal system.”

    “Kuala Lumpur risks reinforcing an impression that its democracy is being shredded by a self-serving Malay elite.”

    I’ll stop here: despite words such as “deepening” trust deficit and “reinforcing” an impression (only an “impression!) the entire article pretends that the whole thing begins and will end with Najib. It did not: it started several administrations earlier, and has always been partly due to the former British colonial strategy of divide and rule.

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