On Ungku Aziz and Raja Petra Kamaruddin (RPK)


January 12, 2016

On Ungku Aziz and Raja Petra Kamaruddin (RPK)

by Dr. M Bakri Musa, Morgan-Hill, California

Hang Jebat and Hang Nadim are but characters in our legends, but the chronicles of their exploits serve as eternal lessons of what a free-mind can achieve. Munshi Abdullah and Datuk Onn were giants in our history, but many especially the young may not have heard of or find them interesting. So I will cite a pair of contemporary figures as exemplars of a free mind.

Ungku Aziz

Many know of Ungku Aziz, a man of many firsts. I will not enumerate them because they are not pertinent to my story. To me, he is a man whose insight on rural (and thus Malay) poverty is unmatched. Equally unmatched is our present leaders’ inability or unwillingness to tap his vast expertise.

I first heard of him as a secondary school student in the late 1950s while visiting the University of Malaya. There was a lull in our schedule and we were let loose in the library. Among the stacks of books there was one that attracted my attention, a thick volume, The Fragmentation of Estates. Below that was the author’s name, “Ungku A. Aziz.”

What drew my attention was of course the author’s name. In those days it was rare to see a Malay name attached to a book, except perhaps a trashy novel on jinns or hookers. (It still seems that way today!) Even though I did not understand a word in the book (it was a classic socio-economic study of the rubber industry in the early years of independence), it nonetheless made a huge impression on me.

Here I was a high school student; I had difficulty even completing reading my much thinner textbooks. Yet in front of me was this thick volume on a substantive topic written by a Malay. It inspired me! I wondered whether someday I too could have my name appended to a book of similar substance.

Unlike others who are content merely with cataloging the ills of Malay society and then dredging up old ugly stereotypes to “explain” our socio-economic backwardness, Ungku Aziz approached the problem systematically. He studied poor rural Malay families, from measuring the heights and weights of their children (indicators of nutritional status and thus economic level) to recording the number of sarongs per household – his famous “sarong index” of rural poverty.

One of his many studies debunked the view widely held (then as well as now, and not just by non-Malays) that we Malays do not save or respond to modern economic incentives. Indeed a casual observer would conclude similarly, seeing the small number of accounts by Malays in financial institutions. And when the British tried to increase the interest rates of postal savings accounts to encourage Malays to save, we did not respond as the colonials had expected.

In his studies Ungku Aziz discovered that the reality was far different. Malays were indeed diligent savers as attested to the ubiquitous bamboo tabongs in Malay homes. We saved for weddings and of course for a trip to Mecca, the aspiration of all Muslims. However, we did not use conventional savings institutions like banks because of our religious prohibitions against ribaa (interest).

It is a tribute to the genius of Ungku Aziz that he not only identified the problem correctly (key towards solving it) but went on to create institutions that would cater to the specific economic needs of Malays. Thus was born Tabung Haji, a mutual fund-like financial institution that takes in Malay savings, especially from rural areas, and invests them in halal enterprises (meaning, no casinos or breweries). The returns on such investments were rightly labeled as fa’edah (dividends) and not bunga (interest), thus satisfying Malay religious sensitivities.

Today Tabung Haji is one of the largest financial institutions in Southeast Asia, a tribute to the brilliance of one man, one whose mind is not trapped by the conventional wisdom and thinking.

There are today many more Malay economists, some sporting impressive doctorates from elite universities. Thus you would expect a quantum leap in the number of innovations like Tabung Haji to cater to the special and specific needs of Malays. Alas this is not the case. Instead what we have are a plethora of government-linked companies and similar entities more adept at sucking precious public funds out of Treasury and then squandering them.

Even Tabung Haji has not demonstrated any innovation since its inception. No one has carried the ball forward. I would have thought those eminently trained economists that Prime Minister Najib brags about being on his team would expand Tabung’s reach, like catering for Muslims in the region, or offering services beyond Hajj and umrah. I would have expected Tabung Haji to have its own fleet of aircrafts and branch offices in every village, not to mention expanding its lending activities beyond. Tabung Haji should have also long ago driven those usurious Chettiars and Ah Longs out of business.

As is evident, impressive academic qualifications or holding an exalted position does not equal or signal a free and innovative mind. Often times the more impressive your title and position are, or the degrees you have accumulated, the more beholden you are to expectations. Your mind is trapped into thinking of only complex solutions while missing out on the simple, inexpensive and less sexy ones.

The Iconic RPK

Raja Petra Kamaruddin- A Free Mind with a passion for Justice

The reverse is probably even more true, that is, those without exalted titles or positions are freer and unafraid to express themselves. Raja Petra Kamarudin best exemplifies this. Many do not know or care who the chief editor of The New Straits Times or any of the other mainstream media is, but almost all have heard of and more importantly pay attention to Raja Petra. A reflection of his fame or notoriety (from the government’s view) is that he is recognized simply by his initials. He is truly transformational, to use Najib’s favorite and over-used word, and a phenomenon.

A scion of the Selangor royal family, RPK could have easily followed in the footsteps of so many of his peers, living it up courtesy of the generous royal civil allowance. Instead he became a successful entrepreneur, a genuine one in contrast to hordes of the ersatz variety that plagues our community. Now retired from his business, he devotes himself to his wildly popular and highly influential website, Malaysia-Today.

His first presence in cyberspace was in 1995, the dawn of the digital age, with his rather unimaginative “Raja Petra’s Homepage.” At that time he was one of the few who dared write uncomplimentary articles on the government. He was also among the first to predict the impending split between Prime Minister Mahathir and his then deputy, Anwar, at a time when the former was “110 percent” behind the latter. RPK sensed the maneuvering of Anwar’s underlings eager to replace Mahathir’s.

Then like so many Malaysians who were deeply offended by the government’s treatment of Anwar, RPK started his “Free Anwar” webpage. When Anwar was finally freed, far from losing a cause and withering away, Pete, as he is known by those who know him well, started Malaysia-Today with the avowed purpose “to teach Malaysians how to think, to dissent, to question, and much more,” as he once told a BBC interviewer. And with that, RPK blossomed and Malaysia is the beneficiary.

There are many other news portals and Internet sites including those of the established media, but none matches Raja Petra’s Malaysia-Today in terms of readership and influence. The government is only too aware of this, hence the frequent attempts at blocking the site. The authorities even resorted to arresting him under the ISA but the man was unfazed. The last time he was held, the government had to quickly release him unconditionally as he threatened a hunger strike. To this day, he remains the only ISA prisoner to be released unconditionally.

The Indonesian writer Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s free-mindedness while being imprisoned blossomed his mind to craft those wonderful Pulau Buru quartet novels; Raja Petra’s led to his unconditional release.

Pramoedya said it best. When asked how he could have managed to craft such wonderful works while being imprisoned under the most inhumane conditions, responded, “I create freedom for myself!” That is the awesome power of a free mind!

24 thoughts on “On Ungku Aziz and Raja Petra Kamaruddin (RPK)

  1. Ungku Aziz’ innovative economic thinking is like Muhammad Yunus’
    (of Grameen Bank fame)

    Hmm… the good doctor does not know that RPK is being heavily criticised by Sarawak Report for his writings today? I would say that RPK’s writings today are sometimes subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle (and even mischevious) pro-regime propaganda.

  2. Some of the best local economic brains being mis(used) to

    1. Find ways to further squeeze the people financially, to support the
    kleptocrats’ lavish lifestyles? GST?

    2. Dream up new schemes to enrich rent-seekers? Foreign trade schemes such as rare earth extraction projects and “red sea” mineral export projects?

    3. Find ways to get 1MDB out of the deep hole it has dug itself?

    4. Come up with new official financial propaganda to make it seem
    as if the country is still “doing very well, thank you, on track towards Vision 2020”?

    5. Dream up new schemes to keep the masses satisfied (or less dissatisfied)? BR1M?

  3. One man’s meat is another man’s poison.

    With all his trials and tribulations of the past and his current cosy comfort in self chosen exile, he is still my poison. How could he be exemplary when he can turn around 180% as and when he chooses. Perhaps he is “seduced” to seduce his readers.

  4. Royal Professor Ungku Aziz was my rural economics lecturer in the 1960’s. He is a public intellectual and an educator par excellence. I admire the man for his fine qualities. He was my referee when I was applying for a position in government service. He recommended me to Pak Laidin at the Ministry of Agriculture before I opted to join the Foreign Service.

    Pak Laidin’s daughter,Zawiah Laidin was my contemporary and classmate at University of Malaysia. The last time I met Zawiah–that was years ago– she was a stockbroker with Dato’ Khatijah Ahmad’s broking firm.

    RPK must have changed his mind about many things. I may not agree with him some of the time. But I think he can be a loyal friend. I interacted with him quite often when he was in Malaysia and found him and his wife Marina to be genuinely concerned about developments in Malaysia. Dr Bakri is paying tribute to a civil society activist who is free in mind and spirit. Rightly so.–Din Merican

  5. RPK is a slimy greedy dude… he mix real ones n talk others like a tukang karut…
    he is no 1 supporter of Najib now…

    whack dap, pkr as you wish, i dont care about any political parties… but by siding with Njib, he has shown that money can buy most ppl including himself…

  6. Quote from Sarawak Report:

    “Because they are desperate to balance the books (which they are notably failing to do, because of their earlier extreme greed) they are selling off central KL at bargain prices to foreign buyers – and then pretending they have got a better deal than they have”.

  7. Inche Din, Thanks for your perspective on RPK. I stopped reading his blog for some 2 years. Perhaps I should re-think. He is articulate and has mastery of language. He should be more accommodative of his critics and stop his bad habit of talking down of people who sometimes badger his “I know all” attitude and high falutin viewpoints. He whacks them but does not want return courtesy in equal vein.
    _________________
    You should not shut someone whose views differ from yours. The key word is engagement.–Din Merican

  8. I don’t know RPK and have not been following his writings, therefore, I have no comments on Dr. Bakri’s observations of him. Ungku Aziz was my senior by a few years at the University of Malaya in Singapore (now NUS) in the early 1950s. I served under him as his Registrar for 18 years from October 1968 to December 1985 when he was the vice-chancellor of Universiti of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur. I was already the Regisitar before his appointment as the vice-chancellor. I note Dr. Bakri’s observations of him..
    ________________
    Happy New Year and Good Luck and Great Health, CTLim.–Din Merican

  9. I remember Prof Ungku Aziz’s famous words in the immediate aftermath of the May 13 1969 race riot when the University of Malaya campus was surrounded by riot, bloodshed and curfew.

    ” The campus was an oasis of peace”.

    He set up a Command Center at the Uni Admin office and got admin staff to coordinate with student bodies in the residential colleges and the campus Territorial Army to ensure safety and well being of students when the racial riot flared up.

    The riot started on the,second day in the first week of the university academic calendar ( University Orientation Week) when new intakes were registering for their courses and faculty and residential student bodies were assisting new intakes to,adjust to the campus surrounding.

    There was NO SINGLE RACIAL INCIDENT in the residential colleges and in campus during the 10 days of the racial rioting outside the campus. Much credit be given to the campus Territorial Army. In factnsome of the colleges acted as refuges for the riot’s victims and their families.

    UNGKU AZIZ AS VC IS RESPONSIBLE FOR HELPING TO KEEP THE CAMPUS SAFE FROM THE BLOODY RIOT OUTSIDE THE GATES…. MANY STUDENTS AND FACULTY STAFF FAILED TO REALISE THAT, EVEN TO THIS TODAY.

  10. Although I never attended MU, I can only remember his name out of the many who went on to be VC there. A nationalist, scholar, educator and most of all the inimitable Renaissance Man—but how was he repaid for the selfless contributions to the development of ANGKASA—Angkatan Koperasi Kebangsaan Malaysia?

    One can only shed silent tears to read about how one man stood up to financial chicanery only to be ejected from the very body that he created. I did not quite follow up with the outcome of what happened to the few key players in the drama—variations of scandalous financial behaviour going unpunished seem to define our public spaces up till now. Immunity from prosecution—read as, the protocol of selective prosecution—negates every attempt by the powers that be to project the image that “everything is above board, transparent and equitable” when it is not.

    Go to:
    a) ANGKASA: Alleged Fraud at Umbrella Co-op: http://www.consumer.org.my/index.php/focus/cooperative-scandals/391-history-of-cooperative-scandals

    b) : Ungku Aziz removed as Angkasa chief: https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/659124/all

    On RPK, I shall only say this: as “A scion of the Selangor royal family” explains everything why, “he remains the only ISA prisoner to be released unconditionally”!

    Much has changed, so much remains the same” – anon

    Although I never attended MU, I can only remember his name out of the many who went on to be VC there. A nationalist, scholar, educator and most of all the inimitable Renaissance Man—but how was he repaid for the selfless contributions to the development of ANGKASA—Angkatan Koperasi Kebangsaan Malaysia?

    One can only shed silent tears to read about how one man stood up to financial chicanery only to be ejected from the very body that he created. I did not quite follow up with the outcome of what happened to the few key players in the drama—variations of scandalous financial behaviour going unpunished seem to define our public spaces up till now. Immunity from prosecution—read as, the protocol of selective prosecution—negates every attempt by the powers that be to project the image that “everything is above board, transparent and equitable” when it is not.

    Go to:
    a) ANGKASA: Alleged Fraud at Umbrella Co-op: http://www.consumer.org.my/index.php/focus/cooperative-scandals/391-history-of-cooperative-scandals

    b) : Ungku Aziz removed as Angkasa chief: https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/659124/all

    On RPK, I shall only say this: as “A scion of the Selangor royal family” explains everything why, “he remains the only ISA prisoner to be released unconditionally”!

    Much has changed, so much remains the same” — anon

  11. Although I never attended MU, I can only remember his name out of the many who went on to be VC there. A nationalist, scholar, educator and most of all the inimitable Renaissance Man—but how was he repaid for the selfless contributions to the development of ANGKASA—Angkatan Koperasi Kebangsaan Malaysia?

    One can only cry silently to read about how one man stood up to financial chicanery only to be ejected from the very body that he created. I did not quite follow up with the outcome of what happened to the few key players in the drama—variations of scandalous financial behaviour going unpunished seem to define our public spaces up till now. Immunity from prosecution—read as, the protocol of selective prosecution—negates every attempt by the powers that be to project the image that “everything is above board, transparent and equitable” when it is not.

    Go to:
    a) ANGKASA: Alleged Fraud at Umbrella Co-op: http://www.consumer.org.my/index.php/focus/cooperative-scandals/391-history-of-cooperative-scandals

    b) : Ungku Aziz removed as Angkasa chief: https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/659124/all

    On RPK, I shall only say this: as “A scion of the Selangor royal family” explains everything why, “he remains the only ISA prisoner to be released unconditionally”!

    Much has changed, so much remains the same” – anon

  12. Indeed Royal Professor Ungku Aziz is a man of free-mind, many ideas and an icon of academic excellence of his time.

    The country had benefited much in terms of his contributions and ideas to the country’s progress, which includes the lifting of countless rural folks to be living above the poverty line.

    He believes strongly the power of education playing a central role in the socio-economic developments of the country. He attached himself firmly to the library (at that time) in search of wider knowledge and information and stop telling his students to do so.

    On one occasion (NST July 20, 1978), when he was speaking at the presentation of certificates to 105 university staff and teachers from around the country, who had undergone a one year intensive BM and English course, he remarked emphatically, the importance …‘’ to read and understand the English Language ’’, in order to acquire knowledge and information because 90 % of the half-million books in the university library was in English.

    I agreed totally with him and asked, in the past 10 years,
    Why then, is the drop in the standard?

    This question essentially was posted, in my letter dated 27 th. July 1978 to the NST, with a copy extended each, to him, numerous cabinet ministers including the education and some other political and institutional leaders, other press as well.
    From all the past and present PMs to every ministers, political and institutional leaders, academicians, and most of the people, had been fully aware of its (English) importance, yet the standard of English was “deliberately’’ allowed to deteriorate to this present sorry state of affair, where vast numbers of graduates had been rendered unemployable, especially in the private sector- many cannot even string a sentence properly.

    Why nothing or little has been done since, and even now, except constant loud and empty rhetoric?
    (Sigh !…., Like many, many, I had lamented with it for the past 40 years.)

    What kind of leaders, particularly the political, are they or do we have?

    What then, is the point of having a free-mind or even a great mind?

  13. A correction: please include Prof Syed Hussein Alatas and Tan Sri Dr. Abdullah Sanusi as prominent ex VC of MU.

  14. I note Frank’s comments on the UM campus situation during the 10 days of racial riots from 13th May 1969. I agree with Frank. Contrary to the claims made by some people, the UM campus was indeed calm and peaceful during the said period although Kampong Kerinchi nearby was a hot spot then (see pages 200 to 204 of my Book ” University of Malaya, 1949 to 1985: Its Establishment, Growth and Development”, UM Press, 2013. However, with due respect to Frank, although Ungku Aziz, as the vice-chancellor then, was responible for ensuring the safety of the campus and its student residents, credit should not be given entirely to him alone, and the UM Territorial Army. Many others too helped then, such as the Masters and staff of the residential colleges and many senior students. Before the racial riots, the Malay students in UM were very much involved in the student demonstrations and protests over various campus issues, such as implementation of Bahasa Malaysia, problems faced by students from Malay-medium schools and from the rural areas, etc., but they did not cause any problem for the UM Administration during the period of the racial riots. Instead, many helped to maintain peace and harmony in the campus. I say this because I was in the nidst of all these as the UM Registrar then.

  15. With reference to my last comment, please amend “nidst” at the end to read “midst”, The late Syed Hussain Al-atas, Ungku Aziz’ cousin, a long-tme friend of mine from the University of Malaya in Singapore days was a great scholar. However, with due respect to him, he remained a scholar more than a university administrator. We had a long chat over dinner in Bandar Seri Begawan soon after he took over as the vice-chancellor of the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur (UM).. He had asked for my suggestions on how the UM Administration should be run. Unfortunately, it was difficult for him to make changes due to the strong resistance of some senior academics of UM. I had met Abdullah Sanusi, a fellow alumnus of UM. He was a talented civil servant in Malaysia and might have felt out of place as the vice-chancellor of UM, an academic institution.

    As for the falling standard of English in UM, as I said in an earlier post somewhere, Tun Mahathir as the former Minister of Education and later Deputy Prime Ministr cum Minister of Education of Malaysia and Ungku A. Aziz as the vice-chanccllor of UM are, perhaps the best perons to clarify the matter. The Ministry of Education and Ungku Aziz tried to do somethng about it in the mid1970s. UM implemented the UMESP (English for Special Purposes) project in conjunction with the British Council, the Inter University Council (IUC) of London [UM gave the late Richard Griffiths, the Director of IUC then, an Honorary LLD degree] and the University of Birmingham in UK. Prof. J.M. Snnclair of Birmngham U and Prof. Dato’ Asmah bte Hj. Omar, the Director of UM’s Language Centre, were the Joint Directors of the project. The aim was for UM to produce graduates proficient in Bahasa Malaysia and English in the various academic disciplines and to produce teaching materials and teachng methods for the said purpose. At the same time, UM, at the request of the Ministry of Education, introduced the one -year Certificate in TESL programme for non-graduate teachers and the Dip.TESL programme for graduate teachers. I wonder what happened to the UMESP project and to these TESL programmes.

  16. In the mid-1970s, while visiting KL as a secondary school student, I remember witnessing (from a bus) some university students demonstrating on Federal Highway. Then the FRU “red helmets” came and stopped the
    demonstration. One student was hit on the head with a club and then arrested and taken way.

    (Not sure what they were demonstrating against).

  17. I read RPK’s blog these days to get an UMNO perspective. He’s the de-facto Unit Media Baru head of UMNO. Nothing wrong in earning a living as there is plenty to go around. Best is he can do all this by pretending to defend Hadi Awang. One day he will turn around say this was “silap mata” in one of his ‘I told you’ so articles. East Highlander

  18. I refer to Phua Khai Lit’s comment of 14th Jan 2016 wherein he referred to a student demonstration in the mid 1970 along the Federal Highway but did not know the reason for the demonstration. The reason was as follows:

    The Malay students in UM had already been staging protests and demonstrations in the late 1968 and in early 1969 over various campus issues. Following the racial riots of 13th May 1969, the Malay student activists staged a series of demonstrations in the campus to demand that the late YTM Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al-Haj step down as the PM of Malaysia.They held Tunku responsible for the emergence of a capitalist system which they claimed was the root cause of rural poverty in the country and which they claimed had resulted in the racial riots. The Police Federal Reserve Unit (FRU), on 29th August 1969, went into the UM campus to break up the anti-Tunku demonstrations and detained several students and a few UM staff. This made the Malay students furious as that was the first time the Police had entered the campus. The students demanded the release of those detained and they protested aganst the police actions. The next day, as the students rallied outside the UM entrance (not the Federal Highway but a side road joining up to the Federal Highway) to march to the PM’s Department in the city to protest, the FRU personnel, who were standing nearby, charged at the students to break up the procession. UKM was then located at the premises of the former Language Institute, at the entrance of UM, and many of its Muslim students had joined up with the students’ procession. The FRU used batons and tear gas to break up the proceession.

    It was during the late 1960s and the early 1970s that student activism in UM and the student movement in the country emerged with great vigour and tenacity, joined by students of the newly established public universities (USM and UKM, and soon after by UPM and UTM) and other institutions of higher learning like the MARA Institute of Technology, Members of other student bodies like the Socialist Club and the Islamic Students Society also joined them. Those were the days of student activists like Syed Hamid Ali, Hishamuddin Rais and Anwar Ibrahim. The student movement had become such a sizeable body by the early 1970s so much so that it was in a position to question and oppose government policies. By then, the movement was already protesting and holding demonstrations on various domestic, regional and international issues, particularly those concerning Malays and Muslims. At home, the movement regarded itself as the watchdog of social injustices against the Malay peasants and the rural poor. This led to the Government enacting the Universities and University Colleges Act of 1971 and its amendments of 1975 (UUCA) which the students regarded as an attempt by the Government to control and weaken the student movement. Despite the introduction of the UCCA, the student movement still continued with its protests and demonstrations until 1974. However, it was already a spent force by 1975, not because of the UUCA but because its active leaders had graduated and there was no new and capable leaders forthcoming. See my Book “University of Malaya, 1949 to 1985: Its Establishment, Growth and Development. UM Press, 2013.

  19. @chungtatlim : would you happen to remember DSAI’s position during those tumultous years of 1969-1970 that you could share with many younger ones?

    >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anwar_Ibrahim#Early_years_.281968.E2.80.931982.29
    From 1968 to 1971, as a student, Anwar was the president of National Union Of Malaysian Muslim Students. Around the same time, he was also the president of University of Malaya Malay Language Society (Malay: Persatuan Bahasa Melayu Universiti Malaya (PBMUM)). In 1971, he was a member of the pro tem committee of Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) or Muslim Youth Movement of Malaysia which he co-founded.
    ____________________
    Anwar is a big disappointment. He is really not what he claims to be. He was a Malay language supremacist as Minister of Education in Mahathir’s Cabinet before he was sent to jail for sodomy. In the 1960s when I was at the University of Malaya,PBMUM was active in promoting Malay language as Medium of instruction. I refused to join the society because I thought PBMUM and Syed Nasir were up to no good for the future of our country and did not support their campaign to replace English. –Din Merican

  20. Katasayang, besides some outside positions in 1969-1970 memtioned above, Anwar Ibrahim was the President of PBMUM or Persatuan Bahasa Melayu Universiti Malaya (Universiti of Malaya Malay Language Society) – a big position in a strong and powerful student society in UM then. The total undergraduate population of UM in the 1970-71 session was 7,777 (not including 285 postgraduate students) of which 3,124 were Malay students (the majority enrolled in the Arts-based Faculties). One third of the Malay students were from Malay-medum schools. All the Malay students were members of PBMUM. In addition, Anwar, although a student, was also the President of the National Union of Malaysian Muslim Students. I never had an apportunity to meet Anwar when he was a student. This was understandable, considering that he was such a busy person although still a student. More so, when he became the Minister of Education and Deputy Prime Minister later on. He seemed to have forgotten then that he had been once a student of UM. Syed Hamid was the President of UMSU or the University of Malaya Students’ Union. We still keep in touch on FaceBook. Hishamuddin was also an office-bearer of UMSU and was then deeply involved in the Students’ Socialist Club. I met him then. I invited him to the launch of my Book by Tan Sri Arshad Ayub at UM in 2013. He did not acknowledge my invitation nor attend the launch. One of his friends informed me via FaceBook before the launch that Hishamuddiin was unlikely to turn up as he was then a busy man, having become a big shot in Malaysian politics.

  21. Ha, there is another matter which I would like to comment on, I think we should refrain from heaping too much high praises on any indivdual we do not know personally. Every human being has some good and some bad qualities. In most cases, some of us make our comments based only on what we read in the media. The media, in most cases, are onlly likely to point out and highlight the good qualities and contributions of an individual. I’d rather keep silent in such circumstances.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s