Apple’s Iconic Steve Jobs passes on


October 6, 2011

http://edition.cnn.com

Apple’s Iconic Steve Jobs passes on

(CNN) — Steve Jobs, the visionary in the black turtleneck who co-founded Apple in a Silicon Valley garage, built it into the world’s leading tech company and led a mobile-computing revolution with wildly popular devices such as the iPhone, died Wednesday (October 5). He was 56.

The hard-driving executive pioneered the concept of the personal computer and of navigating them by clicking onscreen images with a mouse. In more recent years, he introduced the iPod portable music player, the iPhone and the iPad tablet — all of which changed how we consume content in the digital age.

More than one pundit, praising Jobs’ ability to transform entire industries with his inventions, called him a modern-day Leonardo Da Vinci. “Steve Jobs is one of the great innovators in the history of modern capitalism,” New York Times columnist Joe Nocera said in August. “His intuition has been phenomenal over the years.”

View a time line of Steve Jobs’ work

Jobs’ death, while dreaded by Apple’s legions of fans, was not unexpected. He had battled cancer for years, took a medical leave from Apple in January and stepped down as chief executive in August because he could “no longer meet (his) duties and expectations.”

Born February 24, 1955, and then adopted, Jobs grew up in Cupertino, California — which would become home to Apple’s headquarters — and showed an early interest in electronics. As a teenager, he phoned William Hewlett, president of Hewlett-Packard, to request parts for a school project. He got them, along with an offer of a summer job at HP.

Jobs dropped out of Oregon’s Reed College after one semester, although he returned to audit a class in calligraphy, which he says influenced Apple’s graceful, minimalist aesthetic. He quit one of his first jobs, designing video games for Atari, to backpack across India and take psychedelic drugs. Those experiences, Jobs said later, shaped his creative vision.

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future,” he told Stanford University graduates during a commencement speech in 2005. “You have to trust in something: your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.”

While at HP, Jobs befriended Steve Wozniak, who impressed him with his skill at assembling electronic components. The two later joined a Silicon Valley computer hobbyists club, and when he was 21, Jobs teamed with Wozniak and two other men to launch Apple Computer Inc.

It’s long been Silicon Valley legend: Jobs and Wozniak built their first commercial product, the Apple 1, in Jobs’ parents’ garage in 1976. Jobs sold his Volkswagen van to help finance the venture. The primitive computer, priced at $666.66, had no keyboard or display, and customers had to assemble it themselves.

The following year, Apple unveiled the Apple II computer at the inaugural West Coast Computer Faire. The machine was a hit, and the personal computing revolution was under way.

Jobs was among the first computer engineers to recognize the appeal of the mouse and the graphical interface, which let users operate computers by clicking on images instead of writing text.

Apple’s pioneering Macintosh computer launched in early 1984 with a now-iconic, Orwellian-themed Super Bowl ad. The boxy beige Macintosh sold well, but the demanding Jobs clashed frequently with colleagues, and in 1986, he was ousted from Apple after a power struggle.

Then came a 10-year hiatus during which he founded NeXT Computer, whose pricey, cube-shaped computer workstations never caught on with consumers.

Jobs had more success when he bought Pixar Animation Studios from George Lucas before the company made it big with “Toy Story.” Jobs brought the same marketing skill to Pixar that he became known for at Apple. His brief but emotional pitch for “Finding Nemo,” for example, was a masterful bit of succinct storytelling.

Share your memories and images of Steve Jobs

In 1996, Apple bought NeXT, returning Jobs to the then-struggling company he had co-founded. Within a year, he was running Apple again — older and perhaps wiser but no less of a perfectionist. And in 2001, he took the stage to introduce the original iPod, the little white device that transformed portable music and kick-started Apple’s furious comeback.

Thus began one of the most remarkable second acts in the history of business. Over the next decade, Jobs wowed launch-event audiences, and consumers, with one game-changing hit after another: iTunes (2003), the iPhone (2007), the App Store (2008), and the iPad (2010).

Observers marveled at Jobs’ skills as a pitchman, his ability to inspire godlike devotion among Apple “fanboys” (and scorn from PC fans) and his “one more thing” surprise announcements. Time after time, he sold people on a product they didn’t know they needed until he invented it. And all this on an official annual salary of $1.

He also built a reputation as a hard-driving, mercurial and sometimes difficult boss who oversaw almost every detail of Apple’s products and rejected prototypes that didn’t meet his exacting standards.

By the late 2000s, his once-renegade tech company, the David to Microsoft’s Goliath, was entrenched at the uppermost tier of American business. Apple now operates more than 300 retail stores in 11 countries. The company has sold more than 275 million iPods, 100 million iPhones and 25 million iPads worldwide.

Jobs’ climb to the top was complete in summer 2011, when Apple listed more cash reserves than the U.S. Treasury and even briefly surpassed Exxon Mobil as the world’s most valuable company.

But Jobs’s health problems sometimes cast a shadow over his company’s success. In 2004, he announced to his employees that he was being treated for pancreatic cancer. He lost weight and appeared unusually gaunt at keynote speeches to Apple developers, spurring concerns about his health and fluctuations in the company’s stock price. One wire service accidentally published Jobs’ obituary.

Jobs had a secret liver transplant in 2009 in Tennessee during a six-month medical leave of absence from Apple. He took another medical leave in January this year. Perhaps mindful of his legacy, he cooperated on his first authorized biography, scheduled to be published by Simon & Schuster in November.

Jobs is survived by his wife of 20 years, Laurene, and four children, including one from a prior relationship.He always spoke with immense pride about what he and his engineers accomplished at Apple.

“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do,” he told the Stanford grads in 2005.

“If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.”

CNN’s Augie Martin contributed to this report

Stanford Report, June 14, 2005

‘You’ve got to find what you love,’ Jobs says

This is a prepared text of the Commencement address delivered by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, on June 12, 2005.

I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to a college graduation. Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That’s it. No big deal. Just three stories.

The first story is about connecting the dots.

I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out?

It started before I was born. My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: “We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?” They said: “Of course.” My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college.

And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

It wasn’t all romantic. I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5¢ deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example:

Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.

None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.

Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.

My second story is about love and loss.

I was lucky — I found what I loved to do early in life. Woz (Steve Wozniak) and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20. We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees. We had just released our finest creation — the Macintosh — a year earlier, and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired. How can you get fired from a company you started? Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well. But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out. When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him. So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.

I really didn’t know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down – that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me — I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.

I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife. Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film, Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world. In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s current renaissance. And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.

I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.

My third story is about death.

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I’m fine now.

This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope it’s the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Thank you all very much.

32 thoughts on “Apple’s Iconic Steve Jobs passes on

  1. Steve Job now enters the pantheon of business genuises which include Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, et.al. May he find eternal peace, knowing that he made great contributions to enhancing the quality of our lives. His legacy is immense. –Din Merican

  2. Can someone pls tell me what is it about the mind sof these geniuses that others don’t have? Isn’t it about time some one form the moslem world give something to the world in this spectacular a manner too if not more instead of wasting time on ideologies that may destroy people. We were all made with the same potential, why is it some actualise their potential whilst others destroy it?

    RIP
    ____________
    Steve is a classic American entrepreneur. Please listen to his Commencement Address at his alma mater, Stanford University. Inspiring.–Din Merican

  3. Unfortunately for all, the time has come for Steve to leave. Good bye Steve. May God Bless Your Soul.

    Hussaini Abdul Karim
    Malaysia

  4. kathy
    The Muslim world is the least literate among the major world religion. Secondly Muslims have been told not to delve into sciences and technology as they are works of the devil. There’s also the pantangs amongst Muslim to push the envelope with the statement “Allah knows best” and Allah’s willing. Thus the Muslims won’t go the extra mile and will tawakal.

    The Jews and Christians are always seeking out new ideas and with very few prohibitions, they’ve even studies the Quran for answers. Often times it’s Art imitate Life. Foe the Americans it’s how to make your work easier and more productive.

  5. But how to you explain anti-science conservatives in America? They are in abundance here in the Bible Belt. We have a lot of Muslim PhD engineering students here. Hopefully one day Muslims can repeat their earlier success.

  6. Steve was born a Muslim : smoked lots of dope : became a zen buddhist. Perhaps the path of an apostate isnt such a terrible one to travel. And his biological dad is a now a casino mogul.

  7. Americans are so good at innovation. They promote creativity. You can’t innovate if you are not creative. In Malaysia, kids are being spoon-fed.

  8. “For the Americans it’s how to make your work easier and more productive” – semper.

    For Muslims it’s how to fulfill the 4-wife quota and still qualify for the 79 virgins. For Umnoputras, how to continue stealing after GE 13. And for old geezers like us, how to ride into the sunset without breaking the kerbau’s back….

    Bean, where art thou???

  9. From Buddhist view all of us have been born and died uncountable numbers of time. Each and everyone of us are going through this circle of birth, old, sick and kick the bucket repeatedly until we are able to see this circle of suffering and following the right path to break free from the circle.

    Anyone interested to know about death should try to read “The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpocheget.

    In short the book describe in detail the process of dying and the important of preparing for death.

    May I take this opportunity to introduce readers to the Statement by His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, on the Issue of His Reincarnation (meaning his next life) which was announced recently.

    http://www.dalailama.com/news/post/746-statement-of-his-holiness-the-fourteenth-dalai-lama-tenzin-gyatso-on-the-issue-of-his-reincarnation

    If you don’t have time read this para.

    “How rebirth takes place”

    There are two ways in which someone can take rebirth after death: rebirth under the sway of karma and destructive emotions and rebirth through the power of compassion and prayer. Regarding the first, due to ignorance negative and positive karma are created and their imprints remain on the consciousness. These are reactivated through craving and grasping, propelling us into the next life. We then take rebirth involuntarily in higher or lower realms. This is the way ordinary beings circle incessantly through existence like the turning of a wheel. Even under such circumstances ordinary beings can engage diligently with a positive aspiration in virtuous practices in their day-to-day lives. They familiarise themselves with virtue that at the time of death can be reactivated providing the means for them to take rebirth in a higher realm of existence. On the other hand, superior Bodhisattvas, who have attained the path of seeing, are not reborn through the force of their karma and destructive emotions, but due to the power of their compassion for sentient beings and based on their prayers to benefit others. They are able to choose their place and time of birth as well as their future parents. Such a rebirth, which is solely for the benefit of others, is rebirth through the force of compassion and prayer.

    Bro Din, Must I write for non-Muslims only?

    Mongkut Bean don’t have to read if he think he will surely meet his virgins just like that Tok Guru.

    Tok Cik also cannot read for he already met more than 72 virgins in this life.

    Semper Fi can read as he always use his brain all his life.

    Ken cannot read because he think he is a product of accident.

    Our Blog host can declare this post irrelevant and push his delete button.

    For our brother Steve, may you be reborn in a higher plane of existence.

  10. It is indeed sad that a man with a surname “Jobs” has passed away at a time when the world econmy is in search of jobs for the children and grandchildren of the babyboomers.

    May His Soul Rest In Peace.

  11. Tean,
    ha ha my brains is almost used up just thinking about events in Malaysia. Too many exciting things happening that my brain has used up all its iteration capabilities and the neurons are beginning to short circuit. Soon some doctor is going to say that I’m a candidate for Tanjung Rambutan which I think is not bad. Imagine a peaceful world and nothing to worry about?

  12. Steve Jobs, a great man and the great gift to mankind.

    His biological father is a Syrian born in Syria, Abdul Fattah “John” Jandali .

    Perhaps Steve Jobs was born a muslim before he was given up for adoption by his biological parents

  13. For Muslims it’s how to fulfill the 4-wife quota and still qualify for the 79 virgins. — Tok Cik

    Where did the extra 7 virgins come from?? As it is it is difficult to provide a constant flow of 72 virgins for every brother Muslim who comes knocking at the Gate of Paradise. An extra 7 will break the camel’s back. Yes, there are camels in Paradise.

  14. I would like to go where Steve Jobs had gone. At least there, I can have a chance to look at Ipad-3 and other later models.

    Those who are going to the Nowhere-Land in the Sky… perhaps you all can get better versions of S-pads ( ie sanitary pads)

  15. Yes, Tok Cik, where did the extra 7 Virgins come from?

    And if I am in your shoes now, I would watch out for the knock on your door from those moral policemen from JAIs and Jakim, for possible rehabilitation.

  16. It is a sad day…..rest in peace steve jobs……you will live in our iphones, ipad,macbook pro,mac pro……….our modern day Thomas Edison your charisma and Visionary will always live in my everyday life……

  17. Hi Semper, it is a sad indictment on our “moslem” world that they are the least literate. I am horrified by this. When will it turn around for them?

  18. “Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

    Thanks Dato” . Yes Steve Jobs surely has found the secret of living one’s life to the fullest and giving it your all becasue when you know you are dying you have nothing left to loose . You will then live every minute of the day to the fullest with no regrets. We may die any minute after this as well, so we may as well honour our lives, say what needs to be said , show how we care fully even though we live far away from home, give our all, love everyone love deeply , live simply and unconditionally.

  19. Mr Bean, he didnt. I am thanking Dato’ for his asking me to read Steve Jobs inspiring talk at Stanford. Pls stay with us will you!

  20. steve will be missed. he was the world’s greatest arab leader since rumi, ibn sina, ibn khaldun, al-ghazali and ibn haytham. besides being in the godly pantheon of science and technology that includes newton and edison, jobs fits the mould of the true arab alim ulama of the above ibns. born a muslim, adopted by christian armenians, died a zen buddhist. he lived life to the fullest, and believed in meritocracy and striving for excellence, 90pc perspiration and 10pc inspiration. he has inspired a whole generation of IT lovers, and i’m sure his legacy will live on for generations. the arab world is in mourning, including his native syria, both sides of the divide.

  21. Steve Jobs started up from his Family Garage to World Power, believe or not?

    Steve Jobs’ Legacy To Democracy: “He was a visionary, designer, founder, perfectionist, CEO, entrepreneur. The man who redefined the digital age, the man who understood what politicians didn’t…..”

  22. I think all these bashing with religions are uncalled for.
    We should try to learn the messages from the great man/human, have faith, love and prepare to die anytime.

    God bless all.

  23. dennis – October 7, 2011 at 2:22 pm

    dennis, thank you for that amazing tribute and recognising his ancestry and his accomplishments adn all those other mystic Sufi leaders snet to our world at differnet times.. Yes it is a great loss and we in the moslem world who have looked so long for a leader one whom has served the world , we are happy that we finally have someone to emulate.

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