Turning Malaysia Airlines Around


September 4, 2014

Blogging from Tokyo, Japan

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Story by
Chan Quan Min (09-02-14)
quanmin@kinibiz.com

Make no mistake about it, Malaysia Airlines’ fourth rescue plan in as little as 14 years is more daring than ever. KiniBiz points out the differences, one of which is the severe job cuts, and asks if this is part of a strategy that will lead to a smaller airline with a clear focus on yield management.

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Over a hundred reporters crammed into a library on the 33rd floor of the Petronas Twin Towers last Friday to hear Khazanah Nasional managing director Azman Mokhtar lay out the details of a 12-point restructuring plan that will plough RM6 billion into Malaysia Airlines over the next three years.

As Azman spoke, it was immediately clear Khazanah had taken over the reins. The “complete overhaul” of struggling Malaysia Airlines or MAS, with an end-2017 deadline to return to profitability, would be under the purview of the state investment fund.

In contrast, previous turnaround plans were initiated not by Khazanah but by former MAS CEO Idris Jala in 2006 and 2009, and more recently, by current CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya in 2011.

It turned out that rumours of Jauhari stepping down at the end of his three-year term in September were only half-true. False because Jauhari would stay on as CEO for another year and true because he would be leading what would eventually become just a shell company with up to 6,000 redundant employees.

Khazanah’s restructuring or “recovery” plan is perhaps the most daring yet for being the first to make decisive job cuts.

About 30% of the staff count will lose their jobs and to facilitate this painful process a new company will be set up as the “new MAS.” Just the employees that Khazanah wishes to retain will transfer to this new company in the coming months, an arrangement that eliminates the need for what might be a messy retrenchment process.

“This takes guts, and I give it to them for having the courage,” Mohshin Aziz, an aviation analyst at Maybank IB said in an email to bank clients.Employees left in the old company can elect to join programmes specifically set up for them to learn new skills for employment elsewhere.

Azman MokhtarAccording to the recovery plan, the operations, assets and liabilities of the old company will be migrated to the new company by July 2015. The MAS identity and branding will not be lost in the process, Azman assured.

The new company or new MAS, as Azman puts it, will “critically involve a significantly corrected cost and operational structure” because the airline will unceremoniously terminate any contracts that are deemed unfair during the migration process.

In short, Malaysia Airlines will start on a clean slate. And to make sure that there are no stumbling blocks on the way, the government will seek to pass legislation – a MAS Act – to specifically address any legal issues that might arise.

The likelihood that such a piece of legislation will pass Parliament is without doubt. The highest levels of government have at this early stage shown the conviction to apply the required medicine to nurse MAS back to health.

“Only wholesale change will deliver a genuinely strong and sustainable Malaysia Airlines,” Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak, who in also the Chairman of Khazanah, said in a foreword to the 38-page recovery plan.

“If we seek a different outcome from past experiences, we must have the courage to choose a different method. Piecemeal change will not work,” he insisted.

Global search

Aside from the job cuts, Khazanah’s Azman appears to have also committed himself to another “different method,” that of a “global search” for a new CEO to lead the new MAS. Khazanah found the current CEO, Jauhari, from within its group of related companies. But his replacement, according to Azman, could come from just about anywhere.

“The search has begun,” he said. “And we are looking at both Malaysian leadership talent and global aviation specialists.”

One of the new CEO’s first tasks, Azman told reporters, would be to make the “decision on who stays and who leaves.”

Khazanah’s mention of “aviation specialists” points to a shift in hiring practices. Past CEOs Idris Jala and Tengku Azmil Zahruddin as well as current CEO Jauhari were appointed without any prior aviation experience. Jauhari’s admission that his turnaround plan was not working, made after the last Malaysian Airline System Bhd Annual General meeting in late June could have spurred Khazanah to consider an aviation man (or woman) as his replacement.

READ On:

http://www.kinibiz.com/story/issues/105921/mas-rescue-4.0-what%E2%80%99s-different-this-time.html?utm_source=applet_mkinicom&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=mkinicom

AND This:

http://www.kinibiz.com/story/issues/105921/mas-rescue-4.0-what%E2%80%99s-different-this-time.html

Malaysia Airlines will be fully owned by Malaysian Government


August 9, 2014

MAS Restructuring : Leave no stones unturned

by Din Merican

Azman MokhtarWell done, TS Azman Mokhtar for making this strategic move at this time, when Malaysians of goodwill are with our government following MH370 and MH17 tragedies where lives were lost. We look forward to know the details of your plan to restructure our national flag carrier.

We hope you will be tough with the MAS Staff Union, and not allow it to dictate what Khazanah should do in the national interest. So reduce staffing. Deal with crony contracts. Review the routes and financing of aircraft; and appoint competent professionals to manage the airline, and have a truly independent Board of Directors,  and finally please seek the advice of MAS elders like Tan Sri Rama Iyer, Tan Sri Saw Huat Lye, Tan Sri Aziz Abdul Rahman and Dato’ Kamaruddin Ahmad.

All of us want MAS to succeed but the restructuring must be comprehensive so that the rot that has plagued our national flag carrier in recent years can be eliminated. Let us face the moments of truth with a healthy corporate culture. Therefore, make use of this opportunity to start on a clean slate. Let us hope Prime Minister Najib has the political will to make a new beginning for MAS.

Malaysia Airlines will be fully owned by Malaysian Government’s Khazanah

by Thomas Fuller@www.nytimes.com

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/09/business/international/malaysia-airlines-to-be-taken-over-by-government.html?ref=asia

BANGKOK — Mired in debt and reeling from two aircraft disasters this year, Malaysia Airlines will be fully taken over by the government as a prelude to a restructuring, the Malaysian government said Friday.

MASKhazanah Nasional, the investment arm of the Malaysian government, formally requested the delisting of the airline in a letter to the Malaysian stock exchange on Friday and offered to buy back shares at a price 12.5 percent higher than Thursday’s closing price.

Malaysia Airlines had been losing money for several years when five months ago, a flight bound for China disappeared, and no trace of the aircraft or its 239 passengers has been found. Just over three weeks ago, another Malaysia Airlines plane exploded over Ukraine, killing almost 300 people.

Khazanah was vague about its plans for the airline, saying only that it intended “to undertake a comprehensive review and restructuring” and that the airline had “substantial funding requirements.” Malaysia’s Prime Minister, Najib Razak, said a “holistic restructuring plan” would be announced by the end of the month.

“This process of renewal will involve painful steps and sacrifices from all parties,” he said in a statement that specifically mentioned the need for support from, among others, the airline’s creditors, raising the possibility of a debt write-down.

The share buyback, which would cost Khazanah about 1.4 billion ringgit, or $437 million, still needs approval by private shareholders, who own about 30 percent of the company. Khazanah’s offer price of 27 sen, 0.27 ringgit, a share appears favorable to stockholders: That price was last reached in February, before the company’s two tragedies.

The disappearance in March of Flight 370 from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing remains a mystery, and a search in the southern Indian Ocean is still underway. On July 17, 298 passengers on a Malaysia Airlines flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur were killed when a company Boeing 777 was shot down over Ukraine.

The disasters aggravated what was already poor financial performance by the airline, which has lost money for the past three years and has been squeezed by nimbler rivals, like Air Asia, the privately owned, low-cost airline also based out of Malaysia that has grown exponentially since beginning operations more than a decade ago.

Malaysia Airlines, which began as Malayan Airlines, in 1947 during the British colonial period, has suffered a number of sharp losses in recent decades. It has often been managed by business executives close to the governing party, the United Malays National Organization, and was bailed out by the government at least once. Like many other government-linked companies in Malaysia, the airline is saddled with ties to influential contractors connected to the party, which has governed the country since independence in 1957.

The Malaysian government sees the carrier as a national strategic asset. In a statement Friday, Khazanah said the goal of the restructuring was to make the airline profitable but also for it to “serve its function as a critical national development entity.”

Malaysia can’t afford a botched handling of MH17


July 20, 2014

MY COMMENTWe have been hit by two tragedies, MH 370 and MH 17 a few days ago,Din Merican both within a space of four months. MH370 is still shrouded in secrecy and  it is a public relations disaster; our leaders and public and security officials handled the foreign media poorly. MH17 was brought down by Russian made missiles in the hands of Ukrainian rebels backed by  Prime Minister Putin’s government. Our political leaders and officials are again in the eyes of media. Let them handle the situation better this time.

Those who are behind this dastardly violence must be brought to account. Our diplomats and those of countries which lost their citizens and the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon must act in concert to ascertain the facts about the downing of this ill-fated 777 aircraft. At home, the new Transport Minister has to ensure that there are no cover-ups, blame games, excuses, and conflicting or contradictory statements. Please provide facts as they come to light, and do it well and ensure that there are no fumbles.

I am glad that our Prime Minister has allowed debate in our Parliament on MH37. I hope Parliamentarians on both sides of Dewan Rakyat can be rational and constructive in their deliberations so that we can achieve consensus on what we should do to restore national self confidence and pride in our national flag carrier, Malaysian Airlines.

No shouting matches please. Bung Mokhtar types must not be allowed to disrupt the debate or make fools of themselves. In this time of national crisis, UMNO-BN and Pakatan Rakyat must stand together. The debate should result in a plan of action for the government. To nudge the debate along orderly lines, there should be a White Paper to Parliament on MH17 in which the government can present its views on what it has its mind to deal with the aftermath of MH 17.Din Merican

http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-07-18/malaysia-can-t-botch-another-air-tragedy

Malaysia can’t afford a botched handling of MH17

by William Pesek (07-18-14)

There’s nothing funny about Malaysia Airlines losing two Boeing 777s and more than 500 lives in the space of four months. That hasn’t kept the humor mills from churning out dark humor and lighting up cyberspace.

Liow_Tiong_Lai-MH17_PC

Actor Jason Biggs, for example, got in trouble for tweeting: “Anyone wanna buy my Malaysia Airlines frequent flier miles?” A passenger supposedly among the 298 people aboard Flight 17 that was shot down over eastern Ukraine yesterday uploaded a photo of the doomed plane on Facebook just before takeoff in Amsterdam, captioning it: “Should it disappear, this is what it looks like.”

That reference, by a man reportedly named Cor Pan, was to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, whose disappearance in March continues to provide fodder for satirists, conspiracy theorists and average airplane passengers with a taste for the absurd. On my own Malaysia Air flight last month, I was struck by all the fatalistic quips around me — conversations I overheard and in those with my fellow passengers. One guy deadpanned: “First time I ever bought flight insurance.”

MH17 CrashThere is, of course, no room for humor after this disaster or the prospect that the money-losing airline might not survive — at least not without a government rescue. This company had already become a macabre punch line, something no business can afford in the Internet and social-media age. It’s one thing to have a perception problem; it’s quite another to have folks around the world swearing never to fly Malaysia Air.

Nor is no margin for mistakes by Malaysia or the airline this time, even though all signs indicate that there is no fault on the part of the carrier. The same can’t be said for the bumbling and opacity that surrounded the unexplained loss of Flight 370. Even if there was no negligence on the part of Malaysia Air this week, the credibility of the probe and the willingness of Prime Minister Najib Razak’s government to cooperate with outside investigators — tests it failed with Flight 370 — will be enormously important.

As I have written before, the botched response to Flight 370 was a case study in government incompetence and insularity. After six decades in power, Najib’s party isn’t used to being held accountable by voters, never mind foreign reporters demanding answers. Rather than understand that transparency would enhance its credibility, Malaysia’s government chose to blame the international press for impugning the country’s good name.

The world needs to be patient, of course. If Flight 370′s loss was puzzling, even surreal, Flight 17 is just MH 17plain tragic. It’s doubtful Najib ever expected to be thrown into the middle of Russian-Ukraine-European politics. Although there are still so many unanswered questions — who exactly did the shooting and why? — it’s depressing to feel like we’re revisiting the Cold War of the early 1980s, when Korean Air Flight 007 was shot down by a Soviet fighter jet.

More frightening is how vulnerable civilian aviation has become. Even if this is the work of pro-Russian rebels, yesterday’s attack comes a month after a deadly assault on a commercial jetliner in Pakistan. One passenger was killed and two flight attendants were injured as at least 12 gunshots hit Pakistan International Airlines Flight PK-756 as it landed in the northwestern city of Peshawar. It was the first known attack of its kind and raises the risk of copycats. The low-tech nature of such assaults — available to anyone with a gripe, a high-powered rifle and decent marksmanship — is reason for the entire world to worry.

The days ahead will be filled with post-mortems and assigning blame. That includes aviation experts questioning why Malaysia Air took a route over a war zone being avoided by Qantas, Cathay Pacific and several other carriers. The key is for Malaysian authorities to be open, competent and expeditious as the investigation gains momentum. Anything less probably won’t pass muster.

MH 370 and MH 17 taught us never to take things for granted


July 20, 2014

MH 370 and MH 17 taught us never to take things for granted

by Neil Khor (07-19-14)@http://www.malaysiakini.com

MASPride of Malaysia dented by Tragedy

COMMENT: The loss of 298 lives as MH 17 was shot down over Ukraine has come too soon on the heels of the loss of MH 370. An airline that had a near perfect record for the past 30 years since its inception is now suddenly the most blighted in the aviation industry.

Crying for Loss of Loved OnesThe manner in which we recover, and there is no doubt that we will, shall determine our collective destiny as a nation. Like many Malaysians, I was in shock and disbelief at midnight on Thursday as news of the loss of MH17 filtered through social media. Since the loss of MH 370, I have made it a point to fly MAS whenever possible come what may.

I have grown up with MAS, as a toddler traveling from Penang to Singapore in the 1970s right through my student days at UM, when the airline was kind enough to extend to students with AYTB (Asian Youth Travel Bureau) cards tremendous discounts allowing us to go home on the cheap.

In those days, it was a grueling nine-hour bus ride down Malaysia’s trunk roads from Kuala Lumpur to Penang. A MAS flight not only provided comfort and speed, it assured that students got home safely.

Like the airline, those of us born in the 1970s, have come of age to find a world changed beyond all recognition. It is not that we cannot adapt to change but the changes have come so rapidly and so brutally that nobody has had the time to make sense of it all. We may have been brought up to believe in God and Country (Rukunegara) but globalisation have altered our allegiances.

Similarly, the aviation industry, too. has not fared too well in this globalised world. The pacific period, from the 1960s to 2000, is over.

In those days, emerging nations like Malaysia personified themselves through national airlines. We broke away from Singapore to form MAS, which not only flew the flag but also assumed the burden of unprofitable but necessary domestic routes. The growing up years was characterised by good service, which by the 1980s, was amongst the best in the world.

Flying on MAS was a privileged and entire families would go to the airport to receive or send relatives off. It was definitely not the era of “everybody can fly” but rather “now you have arrived”. Cheap fossil fuels and better-designed plans made flying cheaper and more accessible. By the time the budget airlines appeared in the sky, the entire attitude towards aviation had changed as well.

MH17 Crash Site2 National carriers had to compete like any other in the industry resulting in spectacular bankruptcies, including that of Japan Airlines! With this fundamental change, attitudes towards flying also transformed. Malaysian society changed the most in the last 15 years. The Internet continues to be a great leveler. No single Prime Minister, no matter how powerful, can decide with impunity or set the tone of discussion on national issues like Dr Mahathir Mohamad.In short, MAS like many other “national” organisations has continued to come up short, never meeting the rising tide of expectations. Since September 11, 2002 when two planes slammed into New York’s Twin Towers, air travel has never been the same. I remember traveling from Minneapolis to Louisville in Kentucky with a guide dog as a fellow passenger.

There was hardly any security with checkpoints that were no more stringent than at a bus stop.  That was in 1999 but today the US is imposing full body scans, check-ups on laptops and security scanning of mobile phones. Soon security procedures will take as long as inter-continental flights in all major airports.

From the sad and painful experience of losing MH370, we have learned that the aviation industry itself has not kept up with technological change, with planes entering blind spots and much dependent on 1940s radar technology. There is also very little improvement on how to track planes to ensure better monitoring. Till this day, black box technology still relies on batteries that only last a maximum of 30 days.Now four months onwards, we have lost MH17, which was shot down by a surface-to-air missile over a route that was deemed officially safe by the IATA. Yes, some airlines have avoided this route over the Ukraine but many airlines flying from Europe to Asia were using this prescribed route.

Political maturity in short supply

How high an airplane fly is also dictated by the air traffic controller of the country whose territory one is flying across presumably they know what other flying objects will be flying over their airspace at the same time. As someone who flies on MAS, Emirates and SIA regularly from Malaysia to Europe, this route above the Ukraine is very familiar.

I have also flown frequently to neighbouring Georgia, crossing the Caspian and Black seas. There was really no way to have anticipated that a civilian plane would be shot down. If the European authorities had red-flagged the area as two other Ukrainian military aircraft had been shot down, they should have banned all commercial flights over Ukraine airspace.

Having lost two aircraft involving the loss of more than 500 souls is a very bitter pill for Malaysians to accept. For the longest time we have developed and made giant progressive strides forward. Yes, political maturity is still an on-going battle.

Religious and racial extremism is on the rise but most of us have enough to eat, some even able to share with the less fortunate by supporting soup kitchens.

Never take things for grantedMalaysia is still a great country, blessed with natural resources and a cultural diversity that is the envy ofMH17 Crash site 2 the world. But the loss of our two MAS flights has taught us never to take things for granted. Whilst we can plan and make the best preparations, we cannot foresee how these plans will unfold.

In the case of MAS, some hard decisions may have to be taken to make it viable again. There is no loss of face if we have to start again from scratch. To all those who have lost friends, families and loved ones in MH370 and MH17, my most heartfelt and sincere condolences.

Malaysians the world over are united in grief and sorrow. But I am sure we will emerge stronger and better, at least strive to be better people to ensure a stronger nation going forward.

NEIL KHOR completed his PhD at Cambridge University and now writes occasionally on matters that he thinks require better historical treatment. He is quietly optimistic about Malaysia’s future.
 

 

 

Can Malaysia Airlines survive after MH17?


July 19, 2014

COMMENT: Of course, our national airline can. With a bailout by Khazanah and thedinmerican Malaysian Government. There is too much pride and dignity for Malaysians not to have a national carrier to fly the Jalur Gemilang (our Flag). It will need large amounts of money to save it.

And we have little choice as far as I can see it. But this funding should only be made at the cost of a total revamp of the airline including a corporate culture change, new competent and accountable Board and management, the dismantling of the MAS Employees Union that has been an albatross to MAS management, and renegotiation of all contracts with UMNO crony companies and other parties.

The question is whether the Najib administration has the stomach to proceed with such drastic measures. Tan Sri Azman Mokhtar, CEO of Khazanah Nasional, who I know well, can be very tough this time around.–Din Merican

Can Malaysia Airlines survive after MH17?

by in Beijing @theguardian.com(07-18-14)

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/18/malaysia-airlines-survive-mh17-disaster-mh370-disappearance

MH17 Crash site 2

 Malaysia Airlines was still reeling from the impact of flight MH370′s March disappearance when news of MH17′s crash in Ukraine broke on Thursday. Now many question whether the carrier can survive a second disaster in such a short time.

“It is a tragedy with no comparison. In the history of aviation, no airline has gone through two tragedies of this magnitude in a span of four months,” said Mohsin Aziz, an aviation analyst at Maybank. “Even before the second incident, I have been very sceptical over the company’s ability to survive beyond the second half of 2015. They are making huge losses … This is probably going to hasten that.  It doesn’t matter who is at fault. The perception to the customer is ‘I don’t want to fly Malaysia Airlines any more’, and to battle that is not easy.”

Shares in the carrier fell sharply on Friday, down 11% by the midday break in trading in Kuala Lumpur, as already negative investor sentiment deepened. In all, it has dropped by 35% this year.

Questions were also raised about the airline’s choice of route, after it emerged that some other carriers had avoided the area for months – though many companies were flying in the same area, rerouting only after Thursday’s disaster.

The carrier, and the Malaysian government, came under heavy criticism for its handling of MH370′s disappearance – particularly in China, which lost more than 150 nationals in that disaster. While any airline and any nation would have struggled with the extraordinary twists and turns in a mystery that remains unresolved, relatives complained of confused and contradictory information and insensitivity on the part of the government and company.

At Kuala Lumpur International airport on Thursday night, angry relatives demanded to see the passenger manifest, but could not find a Malaysia Airlines official, Reuters reported.

“We have been waiting for four hours. We found out the news from international media. Facebook is more efficient than MAS. It’s so funny, they are a laughing stock,” one young man told reporters angrily.

While the two Malaysia Airlines flight disasters are clearly very different, the uncanny coincidences are likely to resonate.

“This comes very close [in time]; it was the same airline; the same aeroplane type. It happened outside the more common way of crashing for big airlines; most accidents happen close to landing or just after takeoff. They both have an element of mystery and perhaps unlawful and external interference,” noted Sidney Dekker, an expert on aviation safety at Griffith University.

“If the public is willing to keep them separate and say they really have little to do with each other, and any common link is not Malaysia Airlines, you can probably survive with the brand relatively intact,” he said.

But that is a big if. Five years after Trans World Airlines flight 800 crashed into the ocean near New York in 1996 with the loss of 230 lives, the carrier filed for bankruptcy and was acquired by American Airlines. For an already troubled company, the disaster was the straw that broke the camel’s back, said Dekker. For others, a disaster may well mean “rebranding, rebadging, a new air operator’s certificate”.

The Malaysian Transport Minister, Liow Tiong Lai, declined to comment on the airline’s future at a press conference about the disaster on Friday, describing that as a separate issue.

Prior to MH370′s disappearance, Malaysia Airlines was making losses but seemed to be improving, said Mohsin; it was reducing operating costs and selling more tickets. But while its flights were increasingly full, it had not managed to bump up its fares.

Now the airline’s previously strong safety record has effectively been erased for passengers by two such losses. According to the International Air Transport Association, there were an average of 517 deaths annually in commercial aviation incidents between 2009 and 2013. Now a single airline appears to have surpassed that death toll in a single year.

“People are only willing to fly with Malaysia Airlines if the ticket price is really, really cheap,” said Mohsin. The airline has also faced additional costs, such as supporting the families of victims and increasing its spending on marketing.

Reuters reported earlier this month that Malaysian state investor Khazanah Nasional Bhd planned to take MAS private as the first step towards restructuring the company, citing two unnamed sources.

“For it to completely disappear would be too much of a loss of pride for Malaysia,” said the Maybank analyst. “It is more realistic or probable for the government to intervene directly or via Khazanah.”

One key question is whether the airline should have chosen another course for the Boeing-777, given that two aircraft had been downed in the region that week.

Malaysia Airlines said early on Friday: “The usual flight route was earlier declared safe by the International Civil Aviation Organisation. International Air Transport Association has stated that the airspace the aircraft was traversing was not subject to restrictions.”

Cathay Pacific, Australia’s Qantas and Korea’s two major carriers are among airlines that stopped flying over Ukrainian airspace months ago due to concerns.

“Although the detour adds to flight time and cost, we have been making the detour for safety, and until the Ukrainian situation is over we will continue to take the detour route for our cargo flight out of Brussels,” an Asiana Airlines Inc spokeswoman told Reuters.

But many major players were still flying through the area, though Malaysia Airlines, Singapore Airlines and others, such as China Eastern, have stopped using that airspace in the wake of the disaster.

“‘What’s wrong with Malaysia Airlines?’ is completely the wrong question to ask and will lead us down a rabbit hole of entirely useless thinking,” said aviation expert Dekker. “It is pure chance. I flew through Ukrainian airspace on Monday with my daughter. It could have been us.”

While pilots ultimately have the discretion to refuse to fly along a particular course if they have concerns, they do not make the routes. Those are based on a multitude of factors, including airspace charges and wind speeds that affect journey times, but also, of course, safety.

While the US Federal Aviation Authority had cautioned American carriers not to fly over the Crimean peninsula, there was no such warning for the area where MH17 came down. Ukrainian officials had closed airspace to 32,000ft (9,750 metres), but MH17 was flying 1,000ft above that.

“What I have heard raised in various guises is the broader question: can we come to more efficient international agreements about where to avoid flying and where to fly?” said Dekker.

New Dean for The George Washington School of Business


July 15, 2013

New Dean for The George Washington School of Business, The George Washington University, w.e.f  August 1, 2014

June 01, 2014
Dean Linda LivingstoneDean Dr. Linda Livingstone

The university announced in May that Linda A. Livingstone has been selected as the next dean of the GW School of Business. For the past 12 years Dr. Livingstone has served as dean of the Graziadio School of Business and Management at Pepperdine University, and is the incoming chair of the board of directors of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, the leading international accreditation body for business schools.

She begins her service at GW on August 1, 2014.

“Linda Livingstone has been a highly successful dean, respected not only within her current institution but also by her peers in business schools around the world, who have elected her to lead their accrediting body,” GW President Steven Knapp says. “Her proven skill in managing a complex organization and recognized leadership in business education will make her a tremendous asset to our School of Business and our university as a whole.”

At Pepperdine, in California, Dr. Livingstone led a business school with approximately 1,600 students on six campuses and more than 35,000 alumni worldwide. She oversaw a $200 million expansion of the business school’s regional campuses, increased the school’s international partnerships to 40 business schools around the world, and led the school to membership in the Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative and as a signatory to the Principles for Responsible Management Education.

Under her leadership, the Graziadio School established the Education to Business Live Case Program, which was recognized by U.S. News & World Report as “one of the top 10 college courses in the country that will pay off at work.” She also launched the Dean’s Executive Leadership Series, a high-profile lecture program that brings to campus leading business innovators; introduced a student business plan competition; and added new degree programs in management and leadership, applied finance, and global business.

“I look forward, with enthusiasm, to the opportunity to serve as dean of the School of Business at the George Washington University,” she says. “Working with the faculty and staff to build on a strong foundation of programs and research to continue to enhance the quality and reputation of the school will be a privilege.”

Dr. Livingstone earned a Bachelor of Science in economics and management, a Master of Business Administration, and a PhD in management, with an emphasis in organizational behavior, all from Oklahoma State University.

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